if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    what are the four main components of darwin’s theory of evolution?

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get what are the four main components of darwin’s theory of evolution? from EN Bilgi.

    What Are Darwin's Four Main Ideas on Evolution?

    The four main ideas of Darwin's evolutionary theory are variability in populations, overproduction of offspring, competition for resources and inheritance of traits. Variation provides advantages to some members of a population. The surviving individuals pass their traits to the next generation.

    Home ⋅ Science ⋅ Biology ⋅

    Molecular Genetics (Biology): An Overview

    What Are Darwin's Four Main Ideas on Evolution?

    ••• shalamov/iStock/GettyImages

    RELATED

    Primary & Secondary Sexual Characteristics

    Updated April 16, 2018

    By Ashley Seehorn

    English Naturalist Charles Darwin used his keen observation skills and logic to develop a comprehensive theory that describes the process of evolution. While some controversy surrounds evolution as it applies to human populations, Darwin's theory applies to all organic species. The basic principles of evolution are simple and seem obvious to the modern reader. However, prior to Darwin, no scientist had put all the pieces together.

    TL;DR (Too Long; Didn't Read)

    The four key points of Darwin's Theory of Evolution are: individuals of a species are not identical; traits are passed from generation to generation; more offspring are born than can survive; and only the survivors of the competition for resources will reproduce. The variations of individuals give some members of the species advantages in the competition to survive and reproduce. Those advantageous traits will be passed to the next generation.

    Variation in Populations

    In every species there is variation. This variability occurs even between related individuals. Siblings vary in color, height, weight and other characteristics. Other characteristics rarely vary, such as number of limbs or eyes. The observer must be careful when making generalizations about a population. Some populations show more variation than others, particularly in geographically isolated areas such as Australia, the Galapagos, Madagascar and so forth. Organisms in these areas may be related to those in other parts of the world. However, due to very specific conditions in their surroundings, these species evolve very distinct characteristics.

    Inherited Traits

    Each species has traits determined by inheritance. Inherited traits passed from parents to offspring determine the characteristics of the offspring. Inherited traits that improve the odds of survival are more likely to be passed on to subsequent generations. Of course, some characteristics, like weight and muscle mass, may also be affected by environmental factors such as food availability. But, characteristics developed through environmental influences will not be passed on to future generations. Only traits passed by genes will be inherited. For example, if an organism inherits the genes for a larger skeletal mass but lack of nutrition prevents the individual from growing to that size, and if the individual survives and reproduces, the genes for the larger skeleton will be passed on.

    Offspring Compete

    Most species produce more offspring each year than the environment can support. This high birth rate results in competition among the members of the species for the limited natural resources available. The struggle for resources determines the mortality rate within a species. Only the surviving individuals breed and pass on their genes to the next generation.

    Survival of the Fittest

    Some individuals survive the struggle for resources. These individuals reproduce, adding their genes to the succeeding generations. The traits that helped these organisms to survive will be passed on to their offspring. This process is known as “natural selection.” Conditions in the environment result in the survival of individuals with specific traits which are passed through heredity to the next generation. Today we refer to this process as “survival of the fittest.” Darwin used this phrase, but he credited a fellow biologist, Herbert Spencer as its source.

    Did you find this page helpful?

    👍 👎

    Related Articles

    Primary & Secondary Sexual Characteristics

    The Four Factors of Natural Selection

    What Is the Main Idea of Overproduction in Natural...

    Compare and Contrast Artificial and Natural Selection

    Loss of Individuality Due to Genetic Engineering

    What Are the Different Theories of Evolution?

    What Is the Difference in the Meanings Between Adaptation...

    5 Central Themes of Biology

    How Are Genes on Sex Chromosomes Inherited?

    What are the Causes of Genotype and Phenotype?

    What Is a Homologous Trait?

    Definition of Human Biology

    Relationship Between DNA & Natural Selection

    Examples of Natural Selection in Animal Species

    What Are the Different Variants of a Gene Called?

    The Difference between Craniology & Phrenology

    Life Cycle of Sloths

    List of Genotypes

    What Is the Focus of the Branch of Biology Called Taxonomy?

    References

    University of Michigan: Evolution and Natural Selection

    Phrase Finder: Survival of the Fittest

    North Dakota State University: Darwin's Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection, Population and Evolutionary Genetics

    About the Author

    Ashley Seehorn has been writing professionally since 2009. Her work has been featured on a variety of websites including: eHow, Answerbag and Opposing Views Cultures. She has been a teacher for 20 years and has taught all ages from preschool through college. She is currently working as a Special Education Teacher.

    Source : sciencing.com

    What are the four main points of Darwin's natural selection?

    Variation, inheritance, high rate of population's growth, differential survival and reproduction. Variation : Within a population, some traits can be expressed in various ways and make individuals look and behave differently. It can be hair color, body size, eyes color, reaction while facing a danger, ... Inheritance: Heritable traits are transmitted to the next generation. High rate of population growth: At each generation, the population produces more offspring than what the local environment can support. It leads to substantial mortality. Differential survival and reproduction: Individuals with the best combination of traits to survive in the actual environment will produce more offsprings for the next generation More details: Individuals with the best combination of traits will have a survival and reproductive advantage. As a matter of fact, their traits are more likely to be transmitted to the next generation. This process will change the frequency of traits within the population. This process is called natural selection. Natural selection operate on a trait it it possess heritable variation and confer an advantage in the competition for resources. See this link for more informations about evolution and natural selection

    What are the four main points of Darwin's natural selection?

    Environmental Science The Living World Natural Ecosystem Change

    1 Answer

    Clupeid Jan 8, 2016

    Variation, inheritance, high rate of population's growth, differential survival and reproduction.

    Explanation:

    Variation :

    Within a population, some traits can be expressed in various ways and make individuals look and behave differently. It can be hair color, body size, eyes color, reaction while facing a danger, ...

    Inheritance:

    Heritable traits are transmitted to the next generation.

    High rate of population growth:

    At each generation, the population produces more offspring than what the local environment can support. It leads to substantial mortality.

    Differential survival and reproduction:

    Individuals with the best combination of traits to survive in the actual environment will produce more offsprings for the next generation

    More details:

    Individuals with the best combination of traits will have a survival and reproductive advantage. As a matter of fact, their traits are more likely to be transmitted to the next generation. This process will change the frequency of traits within the population. This process is called natural selection.

    Natural selection operate on a trait it it possess heritable variation and confer an advantage in the competition for resources.

    See this link for more informations about evolution and natural selection

    Answer link

    Related questions

    What kind of natural disaster can help forests grow by allowing some trees to release their...

    How does evolution work?

    How does evolution start?

    How does evolution occur?

    How does evolution begin?

    How evolution affects our lives?

    How can evolution be measured?

    Can you explain how evolution occurs?

    How is evolution both fact and theory?

    How does evolution produce new species?

    See all questions in Natural Ecosystem Change

    Impact of this question

    40531 views around the world

    You can reuse this answer

    Creative Commons License

    Source : socratic.org

    Evolution and Natural Selection

    Evolution and Natural Selection

    - Ralph Waldo Emerson

    - Charles Darwin,

    10 Oct 2010 Format for printing

    In this lesson, we wish to ask:

    How did observations in nature lead to the formulation of the theory of evolution?

    What are the main points of Darwin's theory of evolution?

    How does the process of natural selection work?

    What evidence do we have for local adaptation?

    How can natural selection affect the frequency of traits over successive generations?

    The (R)Evolution of Theory

    The theory of evolution is one of the great intellectual revolutions of human history, drastically changing our perception of the world and of our place in it. Charles Darwin put forth a coherent theory of evolution and amassed a great body of evidence in support of this theory. In Darwin's time, most scientists fully believed that each organism and each adaptation was the work of the creator. Linneaus established the system of biological classification that we use today, and did so in the spirit of cataloguing God's creations.

    In other words, all of the similarities and dissimilarities among groups of organisms that are the result of the branching process creating the great tree of life (), were viewed by early 19th century philosophers and scientists as a consequence of omnipotent design.

    However, by the 19th Century, a number of natural historians were beginning to think of evolutionary change as an explanation for patterns observed in nature. The following ideas were part of the intellectual climate of Darwin's time.

    No one knew how old the earth was, but geologists were beginning to make estimates that the earth was considerably older than explained by biblical creation. Geologists were learning more about strata, or layers formed by successive periods of the deposition of sediments. This suggested a time sequence, with younger strata overlying older strata.

    A concept called uniformitarianism, due largely to the influential geologist Charles Lyell, undertook to decipher earth history under the working hypothesis that present conditions and processes are the key to the past, by investigating ongoing, observable processes such as erosion and the deposition of sediments.

    Discoveries of fossils were accumulating during the 18th and 19th centuries. At first naturalists thought they were finding remains of unknown but still living species. As fossil finds continued, however, it became apparent that nothing like giant dinosaurs was known from anywhere on the planet. Furthermore, as early as 1800, Cuvier pointed out that the deeper the strata, the less similar fossils were to existing species.

    Similarities among groups of organisms were considered evidence of relatedness, which in turn suggested evolutionary change. Darwin's intellectual predecessors accepted the idea of evolutionary relationships among organisms, but they could not provide a satisfactory explanation for how evolution occurred.

    Lamarck is the most famous of these. In 1801, he proposed organic evolution as the explanation for the physical similarity among groups of organisms, and proposed a mechanism for adaptive change based on the inheritance of acquired characteristics. He wrote of the giraffe:

    "We know that this animal, the tallest of mammals, dwells in the interior of Africa, in places where the soil, almost always arid and without herbage, obliges it to browse on trees and to strain itself continuously to reach them. This habit sustained for long, has had the result in all members of its race that the forelegs have grown longer than the hind legs and that its neck has become so stretched, that the giraffe, without standing on its hind legs, lifts its head to a height of six meters."

    In essence, this says that the necks of Giraffes became long as a result of continually stretching to reach high foliage. Larmarck was incorrect in the hypothesized mechanism, of course, but his example makes clear that naturalists were thinking about the possibility of evolutionary change in the early 1800's.

    Darwin was influenced by observations made during his youthful voyage as naturalist on the survey ship . On the Galapagos Islands he noticed the slight variations that made tortoises from different islands recognizably distinct. He also observed a whole array of unique finches, the famous "Darwin's finches," that exhibited slight differences from island to island. In addition, they all appeared to resemble, but differ from, the common finch on the mainland of Ecuador, 600 miles to the east. Patterns in the distribution and similarity of organisms had an important influence of Darwin's thinking. The picture at the top of this page is of Darwin's own sketches of finches in his Journal of Researches.

    In 1859, Darwin published his famous by Means of Natural Selection, a tome of over 500 pages that marshalled extensive evidence for his theory. Publication of the book caused a furor - every copy of the book was sold the day that it was released. Members of the religious community, as well as some scientific peers, were outraged by Darwin's ideas and protested. Most scientists, however, recognized the power of Darwin's arguments. Today, school boards still debate the validity and suitability of Darwin's theory in science curricula, and a whole body of debate has grown up around the controversy (see the WWW site Talk.Origins for an ongoing dialogue). We do not have time to cover all of Darwin's evidence and arguments, but we can examine the core ideas.

    Source : www.globalchange.umich.edu

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 1 month ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer