if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    two interest groups are competing for influence in congress. one group represents banking institutions, while the other advocates for consumer protections. a critic of the influence of interest groups would make which of the following claims?

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get two interest groups are competing for influence in congress. one group represents banking institutions, while the other advocates for consumer protections. a critic of the influence of interest groups would make which of the following claims? from EN Bilgi.

    Interest Group Competition and Coalition Formation on JSTOR

    Thomas T. Holyoke, Interest Group Competition and Coalition Formation, American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 53, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 360-375

    Skip to Main Content

    JOURNAL ARTICLE Thomas T. Holyoke

    American Journal of Political Science

    Vol. 53, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 360-375 (16 pages)

    Published By: Midwest Political Science Association

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/25548123

    Read and download

    Log in through your school or library

    This article investigates how interest group competition, a state of conflicting policy preferences stemming from how organizational memberships are defined, can resolve into conflict or cooperation. The strategic choices of competing lobbyists are modeled as the results of a trade-off between the need to represent members and please legislators, and the additional advocacy resources they hope to gain by agreeing to form coalitions with their competitors rather than fight them in resource-draining conflicts. Hypotheses derived from the model are tested with data from interviews with lobbyists on six issues taken up by the U.S. Congress from 1999 to 2002. The results suggest that while group members do have some limited power to constrain the policy positions taken on issues by their lobbyists, it is primarily the pressures from legislators and competitor groups that push lobbyists into collectively supporting coalition positions different from those desired by their members.

    The American Journal of Political Science (AJPS), published four times each year, is one of the most widely-read political science journals in the United States. AJPS is a general journal of political science open to all members of the profession and to all areas of the discipline of political science. JSTOR provides a digital archive of the print version of American Journal of Political Science. The electronic version of American Journal of Political Science is available at http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=showIssues&code;=ajps. Authorized users may be able to access the full text articles at this site.

    The Midwest Political Science Association, founded in 1939, is a national organization of more than 2,800 political science professors, researchers, students, and public administrators from throughout the United States and over 50 foreign countries. The association is dedicated to the advancement of scholarly communication in all areas of political science. Each year the association sponsors a three-day conference of political scientists in Chicago for the purpose of presenting and discussing the latest research in political science. More than 2,000 individuals participate in this conference, which features 300 panels and programs on politics. The MPSA is headquartered at Indiana University. For further information, contact William D. Morgan, Executive Director, email: [email protected]

    This item is part of a JSTOR Collection.

    For terms and use, please refer to our Terms and Conditions

    American Journal of Political Science © 2009 Midwest Political Science Association

    Request Permissions

    Source : www.jstor.org

    unit 3 test Flashcards

    Start studying unit 3 test. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    unit 3 test

    40 studiers in the last day

    Two interest groups are competing for influence in Congress. One group represents banking institutions, while the other advocates for consumer protections. A critic of the influence of interest groups would make which of the following claims?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    Selected: c. The banking interest group likely has greater financial resources and access to policy makers than the consumer protection group.

    Click again to see term 👆

    All of the following are examples of a linkage institution influencing the policy process EXCEPT

    Click card to see definition 👆

    the president delivering the State of the Union speech

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/25 Created by kaylamccord

    Terms in this set (25)

    Two interest groups are competing for influence in Congress. One group represents banking institutions, while the other advocates for consumer protections. A critic of the influence of interest groups would make which of the following claims?

    Selected: c. The banking interest group likely has greater financial resources and access to policy makers than the consumer protection group.

    All of the following are examples of a linkage institution influencing the policy process EXCEPT

    the president delivering the State of the Union speech

    The concept of "critical elections" is most closely associated with

    party realignment

    Political parties perform all of the following tasks EXCEPT

    Donating soft money to interest groups

    Long-standing third parties, such as the Socialist, Libertarian, and Green parties, are examples of

    ideological parties

    The primary reason for the current existence of only two major political parties in the United States is that

    a winner-take-all electoral system makes it difficult for new parties to emerge and survive

    Which of the following important functions of democracy would most likely be more difficult without political parties?

    Educating the public about upcoming elections

    Which of the following best illustrates the concept of iron triangles?

    Selected: b. The long-term relationships between agencies, congressional committees, and interest groups in specific policy areas

    Which of the following best describes the fundamental job of a lobbyist

    to convince politicians to support a certain interest

    Which of the following makes a correct comparison between political parties and interest groups in the United States?

    A

    Sign up and see the remaining cards. It’s free!

    Boost your grades with unlimited access to millions of flashcards, games and more.

    Continue with Google

    Continue with Facebook

    Already have an account?

    Related questions

    QUESTION

    Money gathered at state inspection stations becomes the property of the state that collects it.

    3 answers QUESTION

    Who was the leader of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference?

    15 answers QUESTION

    Define gerrymandering. Why does it happen?

    3 answers QUESTION

    In the role of symbolic figurehead representing the United States internationally, the president acts as the...

    15 answers

    Sets found in the same folder

    UNIT 5 : AP GOV (college board questions)

    41 terms Kat_Lae

    Gov Unit 5 Exam

    55 terms xoSabrinaxo

    🙌

    17 terms Vansh17

    Gov Unit 4

    28 terms Fulwild

    Other sets by this creator

    Drawing Midterm

    10 terms kaylamccord

    Gov Chapter 5

    32 terms kaylamccord

    AP Gov Unit 2 Test Study

    50 terms kaylamccord

    Anatomy Ch 1

    25 terms kaylamccord

    Other Quizlet sets

    Property - Lectures + MS

    114 terms mikeson28

    gov ch 8

    59 terms teresa_wilcox2

    Lifespan unit 4 test

    32 terms graceheater

    P140 Exam 2

    30 terms MACKLCARON 1/4

    Source : quizlet.com

    Interest groups influencing policymaking: lesson overview (article)

    A high-level overview of interest groups and their influence on public policy.

    Groups influencing policymaking and policy outcomes

    Interest groups influencing policymaking: lesson overview

    A high-level overview of interest groups and their influence on public policy.

    Google ClassroomFacebookTwitter

    Email

    Interest groups facilitate citizen participation in government, organizing individuals to take collective action through voting, fundraising, and disseminating information about their issues to elected officials and the public.

    Key terms

    Term Definition

    "free rider" problem A problem of group behavior that occurs when an individual can receive a public benefit without making a personal contribution of money or effort. For example, a person might listen to public radio but never contribute to the station, assuming that other donors will pay to keep it operating.interest group A formal or informal association of people seeking to influence governmental policy in favor of their interests; interest groups may represent social causes, economic and corporate interests, or religious and ideological interests.iron triangle A longstanding, mutually-beneficial relationship between an interest group, congressional committee, and bureaucratic agency devoted to similar issues; for example, the American Association of Retired Persons, the Congressional Subcommittee on Aging, and the Social Security Administration all work closely together on issues related to senior citizens.issue network A group of individuals, public officials, and interest groups that form around a particular issue, usually a proposed public policy that they wish to support or defeat.lobbying Seeking to influence a public official on an issue; an interest group with a particular agenda may be known as its "lobby," for example "the tobacco lobby."

    Photograph of a sign in the Maryland State House reading "No lobbyists beyond this point."

    A sign in the Maryland State House prevents lobbyists from nearing the debate chamber. Image source: Daniel Huizinga

    Key takeaways

    Competing policymaking interests: There are many competing interest groups, and they can take a variety of forms, but all seek to influence public policy in favor of the needs of their constituents. Not all interest groups have an equal impact on policy, however, as some have more funds, greater access to decision-makers, and more committed members.

    Review questions

    Explain the free rider problem in your own words. Can you think of another example of the free rider problem in society?

    Pundits often complain about the influence of “special interest groups” on politics. Name one positive effect of interest group participation in the political process and one problem associated with interest group participation.

    [Notes and attributions]

    Groups influencing policymaking and policy outcomes

    Interest groups and lobbying

    Interest groups influencing policymaking: lesson overview

    This is the currently selected item.

    Practice: Groups influencing policy outcomes

    Next lesson

    Electing a president

    Sort by:

    Want to join the conversation?

    Log in gabriela nava 3 years ago

    Posted 3 years ago. Direct link to gabriela nava's post “If the majority vote agai...”

    If the majority vote against a policy but an interest group pays a representative to vote against the people, what happens to that majority vote?

    • Davin V Jones 3 years ago

    Posted 3 years ago. Direct link to Davin V Jones's post “If the majority does not ...”

    If the majority does not approve of their record or conduct while in office, they get to vote that representative out of office.

    Dhanashree Kathare 2 years ago

    Posted 2 years ago. Direct link to Dhanashree Kathare's post “what are pundits?”

    what are pundits? • Hecretary Bird 2 years ago

    Posted 2 years ago. Direct link to Hecretary Bird's post “A pundit is an expert in ...”

    A pundit is an expert in his/her field. The way the article uses it, a pundit is someone who is scholarly in the field of political analysis, and frequently gives his/her opinion about political analysis. The word was taken from Hindi, where it also is used for teachers and scholars.

    Julissa Garcia 2 years ago

    Posted 2 years ago. Direct link to Julissa Garcia's post “If the majority vote agai...”

    If the majority vote against a policy but an interest group pays a representative to vote against the people, what happens to that majority vote?

    • Emily2931 2 years ago

    Posted 2 years ago. Direct link to Emily2931's post “Yep, the United States is...”

    Yep, the United States is not always run by majority rule (and interestingly enough, the Founders tried to create protections against "tyranny of the majority," so in some instances the majority is not supposed to get their way). But in the scenario you described, if enough people were frustrated by that behavior, they could vote the representative out of office.

    irijah.a.wright 2 years ago

    Posted 2 years ago. Direct link to irijah.a.wright's post “why was there a plcae whe...”

    why was there a plcae where you cant lobby no more

    Source : www.khanacademy.org

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 11 month ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer