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    The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

    The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition, provides information and guidance on the types and amounts of physical activity that provide substantial health benefits. Health professionals and policy makers should facilitate awareness of the guidelines and promote the health benefits …

    . 2018 Nov 20;320(19):2020-2028.

    doi: 10.1001/jama.2018.14854.

    The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

    Katrina L Piercy  1 , Richard P Troiano  2 , Rachel M Ballard  3 , Susan A Carlson  4 , Janet E Fulton  4 , Deborah A Galuska  4 , Stephanie M George  3 , Richard D Olson  1

    Affiliations

    Affiliations

    1 Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, US Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland.

    2 National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland.

    3 Office of Disease Prevention, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland.

    4 National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, Georgia.

    PMID: 30418471

    DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.14854

    The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

    Katrina L Piercy et al. JAMA. 2018.

    . 2018 Nov 20;320(19):2020-2028.

    doi: 10.1001/jama.2018.14854.

    Authors

    Katrina L Piercy  1 , Richard P Troiano  2 , Rachel M Ballard  3 , Susan A Carlson  4 , Janet E Fulton  4 , Deborah A Galuska  4 , Stephanie M George  3 , Richard D Olson  1

    Affiliations

    1 Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, US Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland.

    2 National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland.

    3 Office of Disease Prevention, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland.

    4 National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, Georgia.

    PMID: 30418471

    DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.14854

    Abstract

    Importance: Approximately 80% of US adults and adolescents are insufficiently active. Physical activity fosters normal growth and development and can make people feel, function, and sleep better and reduce risk of many chronic diseases. Objective: To summarize key guidelines in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition (PAG). Process and evidence synthesis: The 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee conducted a systematic review of the science supporting physical activity and health. The committee addressed 38 questions and 104 subquestions and graded the evidence based on consistency and quality of the research. Evidence graded as strong or moderate was the basis of the key guidelines. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) based the PAG on the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Scientific Report. Recommendations: The PAG provides information and guidance on the types and amounts of physical activity to improve a variety of health outcomes for multiple population groups. Preschool-aged children (3 through 5 years) should be physically active throughout the day to enhance growth and development. Children and adolescents aged 6 through 17 years should do 60 minutes or more of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity daily. Adults should do at least 150 minutes to 300 minutes a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes to 150 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity. They should also do muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week. Older adults should do multicomponent physical activity that includes balance training as well as aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities. Pregnant and postpartum women should do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity a week. Adults with chronic conditions or disabilities, who are able, should follow the key guidelines for adults and do both aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities. Recommendations emphasize that moving more and sitting less will benefit nearly everyone. Individuals performing the least physical activity benefit most by even modest increases in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Additional benefits occur with more physical activity. Both aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activity are beneficial. Conclusions and relevance: The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition, provides information and guidance on the types and amounts of physical activity that provide substantial health benefits. Health professionals and policy makers should facilitate awareness of the guidelines and promote the health benefits of physical activity and support efforts to implement programs, practices, and policies to facilitate increased physical activity and to improve the health of the US population.

    Comment in

    Will new physical activity guidelines prevent weight gain?

    Ekelund U, et al. Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2019. PMID: 30617280 No abstract available.

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    Physical activity

    WHO fact sheet on physical activity provides key facts and information on benefits, risks of inactivity, reasons for physical inactivity and how to increase physical activity, WHO response.

    Physical activity

    26 November 2020 العربية 中文 Français Русский Español

    Key facts

    Physical activity has significant health benefits for hearts, bodies and minds

    Physical activity contributes to preventing and managing noncommunicable diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes

    Physical activity reduces symptoms of depression and anxiety

    Physical activity enhances thinking, learning, and judgment skills

    Physical activity ensures healthy growth and development in young people

    Physical activity improves overall well-being

    Globally, 1 in 4 adults do not meet the global recommended levels of physical activity

    Up to 5 million deaths a year could be averted if the global population was more active

    People who are insufficiently active have a 20% to 30% increased risk of death compared to people who are sufficiently active

    More than 80% of the world's adolescent population is insufficiently physically active

    What is physical activity?

    WHO defines physical activity as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that requires energy expenditure. Physical activity refers to all movement including during leisure time, for transport to get to and from places, or as part of a person’s work. Both moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity improve health.

    Popular ways to be active include walking, cycling, wheeling, sports, active recreation and play, and can be done at any level of skill and for enjoyment by everybody.

    Regular physical activity is proven to help prevent and manage noncommunicable diseases such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and several cancers. It also helps prevent hypertension, maintain healthy body weight and can improve mental health, quality of life and well-being.

    How much of physical activity is recommended?

    WHO guidelines and recommendations provide details for different age groups and specific population groups on how much physical activity is needed for good health.

    WHO recommends:

    For children under 5 years of ageIn a 24-hour day, infants (less than 1 year) should:

    be physically active several times a day in a variety of ways, particularly through interactive floor-based play; more is better. For those not yet mobile, this includes at least 30 minutes in prone position (tummy time) spread throughout the day while awake;

    not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers, high chairs, or strapped on a caregiver’s back);

    Screen time is not recommended.

    When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged; and

    have 14-17h (0-3 months of age) or 12-16h (4-11 months of age) of good quality sleep, including naps.

    In a 24-hour day, children 1-2 years of age should:

    spend at least 180 minutes in a variety of types of physical activities at any intensity, including moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, spread throughout the day; more is better;

    not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers, high chairs, or strapped on a caregiver’s back) or sit for extended periods of time.

    For 1 year olds, sedentary screen time (such as watching TV or videos, playing computer games) is not recommended.

    For those aged 2 years, sedentary screen time should be no more than 1 hour; less is better.

    When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged; and

    have 11-14h of good quality sleep, including naps, with regular sleep and wake-up times.

    In a 24-hour day, children 3-4 years of age should:

    spend at least 180 minutes in a variety of types of physical activities at any intensity, of which at least 60 minutes is moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, spread throughout the day; more is better;

    not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers) or sit for extended periods of time.

    Sedentary screen time should be no more than 1 hour; less is better.

    When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is); encourage; and

    have 10-13h of good quality sleep, which may include a nap, with regular sleep and wake-up times.

    For more information World Health Organization. Guidelines on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep for children under 5 years of age.

    Children and adolescents aged 5-17 years

    should do at least an average of 60 minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous intensity, mostly aerobic, physical activity, across the week.

    should incorporate vigorous-intensity aerobic activities, as well as those that strengthen muscle and bone, at least 3 days a week.

    should limit the amount of time spent being sedentary, particularly the amount of recreational screen time.

    Adults aged 18–64 years

    should do at least 150–300 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity;

    or at least 75–150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity; or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity throughout the week

    should also do muscle-strengthening activities at moderate or greater intensity that involve all major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week, as these provide additional health benefits.

    Source : www.who.int

    Physical Activity Prevents Chronic Disease

    Physical Activity Prevents Chronic Disease. Regular physical activity helps improve your overall health, fitness, and quality of life. It also helps reduce your risk of these chronic conditions and manage them better.

    Physical Activity Prevents Chronic Disease

    Physical Activity

    Prevents Chronic Disease

    Regular physical activity helps improve your overall health, fitness, and quality of life. It also helps reduce your risk of chronic conditions like type 2 diabetes, heart disease, many types of cancer, depression and anxiety, and dementia.

    What Is Physical Activity?

    CARDIO OR AEROBIC ACTIVITY

    Moderate or vigorous

    intensity, every minute counts Gets you breathing harder and your

    heart beating faster

    Examples:

    brisk walking, biking,

    dancing, yard work

    MUSCLE STRENGTHENING

    Works best when you

    work all your body’s

    major muscle groups

    Includes legs, hips,

    back, chest, abs, shoulders, arms

    Examples:

    free weights, crunches,

    elastic bands, squats

    Everyone can benefit from physical activity—no matter your age,

    sex, race or ethnicity, health condition, shape or size.

    How Much Physical Activity Do You Need?

    Try walking 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week.

    150

    minutes each week

    ADULTS

    At least 150 minutes

    of moderate-intensity

    aerobic activity every

    week, plus muscle-

    strengthening activities

    at least 2 days a week

    KIDS

    (6-17 years)

    60 minutes (1 hour) or more of physical activity each day

    PRESCHOOL-

    AGED CHILDREN

    (3-5 years)

    should be physically active throughout the day

    with plenty of opportunities

    for active play.

    Fitting regular physical activity into your schedule may seem hard at first, but you can

    reach your goals through different types and amounts of physical activity each week.

    Tips to Get and Stay Active

    Talk to your doctor

    if you have a chronic

    condition like type 2 diabetes or heart disease.

    Get the support of your friends and

    family—and invite them

    to get active with you!

    Start slowly and add

    time, frequency, or

    intensity every week.

    Schedule physical

    activity for times in the

    day or week when

    you’re most energetic.

    Plan ahead. Make physical activity part of your daily or weekly schedule.

    Walk instead of drive to nearby

    destinations or park

    the car farther away

    and fit in a walk

    to your destination.

    Support improvements

    in your neighborhood

    that make it easier to

    walk or bike to where

    you want to go.

    Learn more about physical activity at www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity.

    Physical Activity Prevents Chronic Disease

    pdf icon [PDF – 1 MB]

    Source : www.cdc.gov

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