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    Tissue types: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia Image

    There are 4 basic types of tissue; connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports other tissues and binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues).

    Tissue types

    Overview

    There are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports other tissues and binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the various passages inside the body). Muscle tissue includes striated (also called voluntary) muscles that move the skeleton, and smooth muscle, such as the muscles that surround the stomach. Nerve tissue is made up of nerve cells (neurons) and is used to carry "messages" to and from various parts of the body.

    Review Date 5/25/2021

    Source : medlineplus.gov

    Tissues and Organs

    Tissues and Organs and Fundamentals - Learn about from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version.

    Tissues and Organs

    By

    Alexandra Villa-Forte

    , MD, MPH, Cleveland Clinic

    Last full review/revision Apr 2022

    CLICK HERE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL VERSION

    Tissues are related cells that are joined together. The cells in a tissue are not identical, but they work together to accomplish specific functions. For example, muscle tissue has muscle cells, which contract to make the muscle move. Muscle tissue also has nerve cells, which send signals to tell the muscle when to contract and relax. A sample of tissue removed for examination under a microscope (biopsy) contains many types of cells, even though a doctor may be interested in only one specific type.

    Tissues

    Connective tissue is the tough, often fibrous tissue that binds the body's structures together and provides support and elasticity. It is present in almost every organ, forming a large part of skin, tendons, joints, ligaments, blood vessels, and muscles. The characteristics of connective tissue and the types of cells it contains vary, depending on where it is found in the body.

    Inside the Torso

    Organs are the body's recognizable structures (for example, the heart, lungs, liver, eyes, and stomach) that perform specific functions. An organ is made of several types of tissue and therefore several types of cells. For example, the heart contains muscle tissue that contracts to pump blood, fibrous tissue that makes up the heart valves, and special cells that maintain the rate and rhythm of heartbeats. The eye contains muscle cells that open and close the pupil, clear cells that make up the lens and cornea, cells that produce the fluid within the eye, cells that sense light, and nerve cells that conduct impulses to the brain.

    Even an organ as apparently simple as the gallbladder contains different types of cells, such as those that form a lining resistant to the irritative effects of bile, muscle cells that contract to expel bile, and cells that form the fibrous outer wall holding the sac together.

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    Source : www.msdmanuals.com

    connective tissue

    connective tissue, group of tissues in the body that maintain the form of the body and its organs and provide cohesion and internal support. The connective tissues include several types of fibrous tissue that vary only in their density and cellularity, as well as the more specialized and recognizable variants—bone, ligaments, tendons, cartilage, and adipose (fat) tissue. In the abdominal cavity, most organs are suspended from the abdominal wall by a membranous band known as the mesentery, which is supported by connective tissue; others are embedded in adipose tissue, a form of connective tissue in which the cells are specialized

    connective tissue

    By Don W. Fawcett • Edit History

    Summary

    Read a brief summary of this topic

    connective tissue, group of tissues in the body that maintain the form of the body and its organs and provide cohesion and internal support. The connective tissues include several types of fibrous tissue that vary only in their density and cellularity, as well as the more specialized and recognizable variants—bone, ligaments, tendons, cartilage, and adipose (fat) tissue.

    In the abdominal cavity, most organs are suspended from the abdominal wall by a membranous band known as the mesentery, which is supported by connective tissue; others are embedded in adipose tissue, a form of connective tissue in which the cells are specialized for the synthesis and storage of energy-rich reserves of fat, or lipid. The entire body is supported from within by a skeleton composed of bone, a type of connective tissue endowed with great resistance to stress owing to its highly ordered laminated structure and to its hardness, which results from deposition of mineral salts in its fibres and amorphous matrix. The individual bones of the skeleton are held firmly together by ligaments, and muscles are attached to bone by tendons, both of which are examples of dense connective tissue in which many fibre bundles are associated in parallel array to provide great tensile strength. At joints, the articular surfaces of the bones are covered with cartilage, a connective tissue with an abundant intercellular substance that gives it a firm consistency well adapted to permitting smooth gliding movements between the apposed surfaces. The synovial membrane, which lines the margins of the joint cavity and lubricates and nourishes the joint surfaces, is also a form of connective tissue.

    abdominal organs

    The abdominal organs are supported and protected by the bones of the pelvis and ribcage and are covered by the greater omentum, a fold of peritoneum that consists mainly of fat.

    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    human hip and pelvis

    Anterior view of the hip and pelvis, showing attachment of ligaments to the femur, ilium, ischium, and pubis.

    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    Blood vessels, both large and small, course through connective tissue, which is therefore closely associated with the nourishment of tissues and organs throughout the body. All nutrient materials and waste products exchanged between the organs and the blood must traverse perivascular spaces occupied by connective tissue. One of the important functions of the connective-tissue cells is to maintain conditions in the extracellular spaces that favour this exchange.

    Components of connective tissue

    All forms of connective tissue are composed of (1) extracellular fibres, (2) an amorphous matrix called ground substance, and (3) stationary and migrating cells. The proportions of these components vary from one part of the body to another depending on the local structural requirements. In some areas, the connective tissue is loosely organized and highly cellular; in others, its fibrous components predominate; and in still others, the ground substance may be its most conspicuous feature. The anatomical classification of the various types of connective tissue is based largely upon the relative abundance and arrangement of these components.

    Source : www.britannica.com

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