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    the species ursus arctos, ursus maritimus, and ursus americanus are all members of the same genus. the classification of the three species supports which statement about them?

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    5.0 12 Reviews taxonomy

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    Scientists depend on a system of _______ to name and classify species.

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    binomial nomenclature

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    Carolus Linnaeus developed _______, in which species are assigned two-part names.

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    Finding Order in Biodiversity

    Terms in this set (11)

    taxonomy

    Scientists depend on a system of _______ to name and classify species.

    binomial nomenclature

    Carolus Linnaeus developed _______, in which species are assigned two-part names.

    systematics

    The science of naming and grouping organisms is called _______.

    taxa

    The term that describes any of the groups of organisms:

    DKPCOFGS (Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species)

    What is the correct ordering of taxa in the Linnaean classification system?

    The three species share many characteristics and are biologically related.

    The species "Ursus arctos," "Ursus maritimus," & "Ursus americanus" are all members of the same genus. The classification of the three species supports which statement about them?

    Two groups of Monerans--Eubacteria & Archaebacteria--differed significantly from one another.

    In the 1990's, many scientists agreed that the five-kingdom classification system scheme should be expanded to six kingdoms,. Which discovery supported this decision?

    The two organisms are members of the same kingdom.

    Organism A and organism B are both classified in the same phylum. Which additional information about the two species can be concluded?

    1) prokaryotic cells

    2) cell walls w/ peptidoglycan

    3) includes autotrophs & heterotrophs

    What three properties to describe the domain Bacteria:

    1) prokaryotic cells

    2) includes methanogens & halophiles

    3) includes autotrophs & heterotrophs

    What three properties to describe the domain Archaea:

    1) eukaryotic cells

    2) includes plants, animals, protists, & fungi

    3) includes autotrophs & heterotrophs

    What three properties to describe the domain Eukarya:

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    Solved The species Ursus arctos, Ursus maritimus, and Ursus

    Answer to Solved The species Ursus arctos, Ursus maritimus, and Ursus

    © 2003-2022 Chegg Inc. All rights reserved.

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    Ursidae

    Ursidae

    The outgroup (Ursidae, bears) possess a lacrimal bone condition which is the ancestral state.

    From: Encyclopedia of Marine Mammals (Third Edition), 2018

    Related terms:

    CanidaeRed PandaGenusSea LionPinnipedMustelidaeProcyonidaeCarnivoraDolphinsCarnivores

    View all Topics

    Ursidae

    Darin M. Collins, in Fowler's Zoo and Wild Animal Medicine, Volume 8, 2015

    Biology

    Bears are mammals within the order Carnivora of the divergent family Ursidae and are geographically widespread within North and South Americas, Europe, and Asia. Within Ursidae, eight species of bears exist in three different subfamilies: Ursinae, Tremarctinae, Ailuropodinae (Table 50-1). The recognition of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) as an early divergent from the bear family is now accepted. The subsequent phylogenetic divergence of the spectacled bear (Tremarctos ornatus) to the giant panda, and the grouping of the brown bear (Ursus arctos) and the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) have been accepted. Bears occupy a wide range of ecologic niches from the arctic ice to the tropical rainforests. Wild bears are generally diurnal but may be active during the night (nocturnal) or twilight (crepuscular). Bears have an excellent sense of smell and some are very adept climbers and swimmers.

    All bears have been threatened by human encroachment into their habitats and the illegal trade of bears and bear parts, including the Asian bear bile market. One of the greatest threats to bears is human-imposed environmental alterations such as global warming, chemical pollution, and deforestation. Current and future global climate changes are expected to pose greater risks, particularly for the polar bear, because of their reproductive life history traits, including seasonality. Consequently, six of eight species are currently facing the risk of extinction, with the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) classifications ranging from Endangered to Vulnerable. The IUCN lists all bears except the brown bear and the American black bear as vulnerable or endangered, with the brown bear at risk of extirpation in many range countries. The long-term conservation of small, isolated, and increasingly human-impacted bear populations will require innovative, pragmatic, and site-specific approaches.

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    Eimeriidae in the Caniformia Family Ursidae

    Donald W. Duszynski, ... R. Scott Seville, in The Biology and Identification of the Coccidia (Apicomplexa) of Carnivores of the World, 2018

    Eimeriidae in the Ursidae Fischer de Waldheim, 1817

    Introduction

    The Ursidae Fischer de Waldheim, 1817 is a family of carnivores comprising 5 genera and 8 species. All family members, generically referred to as “bears,” are in the subfamily Caniformes and are most closely related to the Otariidae (eared seals), Odobenidae (walruses), and Phocidae (true seals), having diverged from a most recent common ancestor approximately 40 (37–43) million years ago (MYA) in Eurasia. Then, ∼23.4 (17.8–28.9) MYA, the lineage split into two, with one branch leading to the monotypic genus Ailuropoda (giant panda, A. melanoleuca) and the second branch diverging 16.5 (10.4–22.6) MYA. This latter branch also resulted in two lineages: the first split off ∼6.8 (4.4–9.2) MYA into the genera Ursus (4 species, black, brown, polar bears) and Melursus (sloth bear), whereas the second split off 6.49 (5.66–7.05) MYA into the monotypic genus Tremarctos (spectacled bear) (http://timetree.org/; Hedges et al., 2006; Kumar et al., 2017). At one time the inclusion of the giant panda in the family was in debate, but molecular and karyotypic analyses confirmed that the giant panda is a true ursid (O’Brien et al., 1985; Pagès et al., 2008).

    In general, bears are large animals with robust bodies. The Malayan sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) is the smallest species, ranging from 25 to 65 kg, and the polar bear (U. maritimus) is the largest weighing up to 800 kg. Extant species of bears are widely distributed, occurring in a variety of habitats ranging from arctic ice to tropical cloud forests in North America, Europe, Asia, and South America. There are no extant species in Africa, although fossil remains indicate that bears were present there at one time too. American black bears, in addition to occurring in temperate forests across the continent, are found in semidesert habitats in the southwestern United States and Mexico. A remnant population of brown bears is found in the Gobi Desert of southwestern Mongolia where they congregate at scattered, remote oases. Most bear species, with the exception of sows with cubs, lead solitary lives and are active primarily at dusk and dawn (crepuscular) or at night (nocturnal). Some temperate species undergo extended periods of lethargy or torpor during the winter, retreating to dens or caves where they rely on fat reserves accumulated during the summer and fall for metabolic energy. Some physiologists do not consider this true “hibernation” because body temperature does not drop and the bear can be readily roused from lethargy, if startled. Others argue that this is hibernation because the bear’s heart rate slows to almost half of its normal rate. Bear species that undergo torpor or hibernation often give birth during this period (Dewey and Myers, 2005). In general, bears are omnivorous and, depending on the species and season of year, a significant portion of their diet can consist of scavenged carcasses, vegetable matter (berries, roots, fruit), and arthropods, in addition to hunting live prey. Exceptions are the giant panda, with a diet that is 99% bamboo, and the polar bear that is almost exclusively carnivorous (Vaughn et al., 2011).

    Source : www.sciencedirect.com

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