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    the sections of song of myself approach one subject from several different angles. how does this technique reflect the main theme of the poem? it shows the complicated nature of the world. it indicates the need for one to think deeply about one’s flaws. it corresponds to the idea that the self is all-encompassing. it supports the notion of concern for one’s friends and family.

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    get the sections of song of myself approach one subject from several different angles. how does this technique reflect the main theme of the poem? it shows the complicated nature of the world. it indicates the need for one to think deeply about one’s flaws. it corresponds to the idea that the self is all-encompassing. it supports the notion of concern for one’s friends and family. from EN Bilgi.

    The sections of "Song of Myself" approach one subject from s

    Explanation:how does your song go?

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    The sections of "Song of Myself" approach one subject from several different angles. How does this technique reflect the main theme of the poem? It shows the complicated nature of the world.

    It indicates the need for one to think deeply about one’s flaws.

    It corresponds to the idea that the self is all-encompassing.

    It supports the notion of concern for one’s friends and family.

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    Explanation:how does your song go?

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    sorry answered wrong answer

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    particulars about treasure island, from the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, i take up my pen in the year of grace and go back to the time when my father kept th

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    Song of Myself by Walt Whitman

    Explore Walt Whitman's 'Song of Myself'. Study a summary and analysis of the poem to understand its meaning, themes, and structure, and read 'Song...

    English Courses / Course / Chapter

    Song of Myself by Walt Whitman

    Adam De Gree, Sophie Starmack

    Explore Walt Whitman's 'Song of Myself'. Study a summary and analysis of the poem to understand its meaning, themes, and structure, and read 'Song of Myself' quotes. Updated: 04/22/2022

    Table of Contents

    'Song of Myself' by Walt Whitman

    'Song of Myself' Summary

    'Song of Myself' Analysis

    'Song of Myself' Quotes

    Lesson Summary Show Create an account

    'Song of Myself' by Walt Whitman

    Walt Whitman has been deemed perhaps the world's first poet of democracy. His democratic sentiments and self-love is reflected in the 'Song of Myself,' an epic poem first published in his compilation, "Leaves of Grass", in 1855. Whitman had to pay to publish this collection, but later, it became immensely popular and influential in his lifetime.

    What Is 'Song of Myself' About?

    'Song of Myself' is wide-ranging in its content and expansive in scope, but the topic that Whitman keeps returning to is - unsurprisingly - himself. Yet it would be a mistake to read this poem as a narrow self-obsession. The self that can be found in the poem is all-embracing. Whitman writes of finding himself in every person he sees, in every blade of grass, in the tangible and intangible aspects of the universe. The self that he contemplates is both intensely physical and profoundly metaphysical, connecting everything, in existence, in a web of love. Though critics complained that the poem's overt sensuality was obscene, it was immediately recognized as a peculiarly American epic, which Whitman hoped it to be.

    Potrait of Walt Whitman who looks like the consummate poet

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    'Song of Myself' Summary

    The 'Song of Myself' is vast, with 52 separate sections, one for each week in the year. It is fitting as Whitman begins with the universe, observing that all the atoms that form his body will one day make their way back into the world and into other people:

    From there, Whitman surveys the multiplicity of human life, with a focus on the American experience. He invokes the crowds of cities and the powerful chests of construction crews, the empty expanses of the prairie, the moccasined feet of fur traders, the panting lips of slaves, and the perfumed air of salons. Loving them all, the poet declares that he is one with the plurality of peoples. Whitman's incantations lend life and color to the nation's motto, 'E Pluribus Unum,' or 'from many, one.' An intense sensuality pervades the work, which returns again and again to the beating hearts and heaving breasts of men and women alike. Whitman is specific, lauding:

    Here, Whitman's thoughts turn again and again to theological matters. He is somewhat radical, declaring the truth of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Christianity, and all forms of natural religions. Once again, the poet embraces the variety of human experience, declaring all to be equal and unified.

    'Song of Myself' Analysis

    Whitman stood as a bridge between two important artistic schools: transcendentalism and realism. Transcendentalists emphasize personal experience over book learning, which is by seeking to learn from nature, and revel in individuality. Realists focus on daily life as it actually exists, on the social, workplace environment, poverty, and hardship. Of the two schools, 'Song of Myself' represents transcendentalism. Whitman urges the reader to stop thinking of the beginning or the end and to focus on the perfection of the present. He proclaims the identity that subsists between human beings and animals. He then invites people to and let inspiration flow forth.

    Whitman was a champion of individualism. Song of Myself is one of the most famous poems by Walt Whitman that paved a path for people to connect with their inner self.

    'Song of Myself' Meaning

    The 'Song of Myself' is an ode to individuality and originality. As the end of the poem suggests, Whitman is not to be defined or tied down. He is immortal in the sense that even after he dies, his matter will meld into the earth, growing forth so many leaves of grass.

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    Common Core ELA Grade 7 - Literature: Standards

    12 chapters | 108 lessons

    Ch 1. Citing Textual Evidence:...

    Ch 2. Central Theme or Idea:...

    Ch 3. Literary Elements:...

    Ch 4. Literary Devices:...

    Ch 5. Structure in Literature:...

    Ch 6. Poetry Analysis: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.5

    Poems with ABAB Rhyme Scheme: Examples & Definition

    6:55

    Blank Verse: Definition and Examples

    Source : study.com

    Section 1

    Section 1, Song of Myself

    Next

    Engraving by Samuel Hollyer, after a daguerreotype by Gabriel Harrison (original daguerreotype lost)

    Foreword

    Whitman opens his poem with a conventional iambic pentameter line, as if to suggest the formal openings of the classic epics, before abandoning metrics for a free-flowing line with rhythms that shift and respond to the moment. Instead of invoking the muse to allow him to sing the epic song of war, rage, and distant journeys, Whitman becomes his own muse, singing himself and announcing that the subject of his epic will be himself. He “celebrates” that self, and the etymology of the word “celebrate” indicates “to return to” or “to frequent.” The whole poem will be Whitman’s record of the self expanding out into the world, absorbing more and more experience, then contracting back into the self, discovering that he can contain and hold the wild diversity of experience that he keeps encountering on his journeys through the world. He sets out to expand the boundaries of the self to include, first, all fellow Americans, then the entire world, and ultimately the cosmos. When we come to see just how vast the self can be, what can we do but celebrate it by returning to it again and again?

    Throughout the poem, Whitman probes the question of how large the new democratic self can become before it dissipates into contradiction and fragmentation, and each time he seems to reach the limit, he dilates even more. In the first three lines, he abandons the two main things that separate people, that create animosity, jealousy, and war—beliefs and possessions: “what I assume you shall assume, / For every atom belonging to you as good belongs to me.” At every level of our being, we are incessantly transferring and exchanging materials, ideas, emotions, affections. The atoms that yesterday composed a living cow or a growing plant today are part of us, as the eternal atoms of the universe continue their nonstop interaction and rearrangement.

    It is in this way that Whitman introduces us to his two main characters, “I” and “you.” This section begins with “I” and ends with “you,” just as the entire “Song of Myself” does the same: we experience the transfer of energy from Whitman’s “I” to the “you” that we as readers learn to inhabit in this poem. It is possible to hear the “you” in “Song” as addressed to the entire nation or the entire world, and it is also possible to hear it as intimately addressed only to the individual reader in this particular moment of encounter. It is one of the most difficult words in the poem to translate, because the second-person pronoun in English is quite promiscuous: “you” is the word we use to address our most intimate lover as well as a total stranger, a single person alone with us in a room or a vast crowd. Whitman teases out all the implications of this promiscuous English pronoun that signals at once only you, a “simple separate person,” and also you, the “en masse,” the world of potentially intimate strangers who always hover around us. Translators must decide in each case whether the “you” is informal or formal, singular or plural.

    The speaker of the poem “loafes” and observes “a spear of summer grass,” and the entire poem is generated in that act. Thinking of the land he grew up in and of his ancestors, he realizes that every leaf of grass is a sign of transference, like the grass that grows from graves, as the atoms of the dead arise again out of the earth and now give voice to him, forming the very tongue that will sing of his past (his organ of vocalization is literally made up of the atoms of the land he sings on and sings about). So “Song of Myself” starts us out on what the poet will call “a perpetual journey,” one that turns into an escape narrative for all readers of the poem, who need to liberate themselves from all the enslaving beliefs and possessions that prevent individual growth, who need to put “Creeds and schools in abeyance” and risk a journey that will take us beyond preconceived notions of “good” and “bad,” a journey that will allow us to confront the “original energy” of nature unchecked, nature freed of the restraints that we have all been taught to put on it.

    —EF

    I CELEBRATE myself, and sing myself,

    And what I assume you shall assume,

    For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.

    I loafe and invite my soul,

    I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.

    My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,

    Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,

    I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,

    Hoping to cease not till death.

    Creeds and schools in abeyance,

    Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,

    I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,

    Nature without check with original energy.

    play stop mute previous next 00:00 00:00

    Foreword to Section 1

    Song of Myself, Section 1 —read by Eric Forsythe

    Afterword to Section 1

    Afterword

    It is said that a poem is an act of attention—to someone, something, some experience or portion of existence, grasped, imagined, or remembered—and in the first section of “Song of Myself” Whitman offers an image of the poet attending to the world, loafing (marvelous word!), leaning, opening his soul up to the world. What he observes could not be simpler, a spear of grass, and that is the point: a poem seeking nothing less than to tell the story of the universe, within and without, will begin at the atomic level, in the blood, the soil, the air, and circulate everywhere—the testament of a man determined to enlarge our imaginative capacities.

    Source : iwp.uiowa.edu

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