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    the national highway traffic safety administration estimates that some _________ lives could be saved every year if all vehicle occupants used seatbelts.

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    Seat Belt Safety: Buckle Up America

    Seatbelts significantly increases your chance of survival during a crash. Seatbelts are the safest choice drivers & passengers can make while driving.

    Seat Belts

    Language: English

    Overview

    One of the safest choices drivers and passengers can make is to buckle up. Many Americans understand the lifesaving value of the seat belt – the national use rate was at 90.4% in 2021. Seat belt use in passenger vehicles saved an estimated 14,955 lives in 2017. Understand the potentially fatal consequences of not wearing a seat belt and learn what you can do to make sure you and your family are properly buckled up every time.

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    Seat Belts Save Lives

    90.4%

    SEAT BELT USE RATE IN 2021

    Source

    Seat Belts The Issue Consequences Adults Tweens NHTSA In Action Resources THE ISSUE

    Consequences

    51%

    PERCENTAGE OF PASSENGER VEHICLE OCCUPANTS KILLED IN 2020 WHO WERE UNRESTRAINED

    Of the 23,824 passenger vehicle occupants killed in 2020, 51% were not wearing seat belts — a 4% increase from 2019.

    Seat belts saved an estimated 14,955 lives and could have saved an additional 2,549 people if they had been wearing seat belts, in 2017 alone.

    The consequences of not wearing, or improperly wearing, a seat belt are clear:

    TRAFFIC SAFETY FACTS

    SEAT BELT USE

    1. Buckling up helps keep you safe and secure inside your vehicle, whereas not buckling up can result in being totally ejected from the vehicle in a crash, which is almost always deadly.

    2. Air bags are not enough to protect you; in fact, the force of an air bag can seriously injure or even kill you if you’re not buckled up.

    3. Improperly wearing a seat belt, such as putting the strap below your arm, puts you and your children at risk in a crash.

    The benefits of buckling up are equally clear:

    If you buckle up in the front seat of a passenger car, you can reduce your risk of:

    Fatal injury by 45% (Kahane, 2015)

    Moderate to critical injury by 50%

    If you buckle up in a light truck, you can reduce your risk of:

    Fatal injury by 60% (Kahane, 2015)

    Moderate to critical injury by 65% (NHTSA, 1984)

    THE ISSUE

    Seat Belt Safety for Adults

    Follow these seat belt tips and guidelines, including do’s and don’ts when you’re pregnant. Then have some fun quizzing yourself about the myths and facts of buckling up, and test your seat belt IQ.

    The Top 5 Things You Should Know About Buckling Up 

    58%

    OF THOSE KILLED DURING THE NIGHTTIME IN 2020 WERE UNRESTRAINED

    1. Buckling up is the single most effective thing you can do to protect yourself in a crash

    Seat belts are the best defense against impaired, aggressive, and distracted drivers. Being buckled up during a crash helps keep you safe and secure inside your vehicle; being completely ejected from a vehicle is almost always deadly.

    2. Air bags are designed to work with seat belts, not replace them 

    If you don’t wear your seat belt, you could be thrown into a rapidly opening frontal air bag. Such force could injure or even kill you. Learn about air bag safety.

    3. Guidelines to buckle up safely

    The lap belt and shoulder belt are secured across the pelvis and rib cage, which are better able to withstand crash forces than other parts of your body.

    Place the shoulder belt across the middle of your chest and away from your neck.

    The lap belt rests across your hips, not your stomach.

    NEVER put the shoulder belt behind your back or under an arm.

    4. Fit matters

    Before you buy a new car, check to see that its seat belts are a good fit for you.

    Ask your dealer about seat belt adjusters, which can help you get the best fit.

    If you need a roomier belt, contact your vehicle manufacturer to obtain seat belt extenders.

    If you drive an older or classic car with lap belts only, check with your vehicle manufacturer about how to retrofit your car with today’s safer lap/shoulder belts.

    5. Seat belt safety for children and pregnant women

    Find out when your child is ready to use an adult seat belt and learn about seat belt safety when you’re pregnant.

    (PDF of the top 5)

    If You’re Pregnant: Seat Belt Recommendations for Drivers and Passengers 

    If you’re pregnant, make sure you know how to position your seat and wear a seat belt to maximize your safety and the safety of your unborn child. Read our recommendations below or view the instructional diagram version of our seat belt recommendations for pregnant drivers and passengers (PDF 497 KB).

    I’m Pregnant. Should I Wear a Seat Belt?YES—doctors recommend it. Buckling up through all stages of your pregnancy is the single most effective action you can take to protect yourself and your unborn child in a crash.NEVER drive or ride in a car without buckling up first!What’s the Right Way to Wear My Seat Belt?

    The shoulder belt away from your neck (but not off your shoulder) and across your chest (between your breasts), making sure to remove any slack from your seat belt with the lap belt secured below your belly so that it fits snugly across your hips and pelvic bone.

    NEVER place the shoulder belt under your arm or behind your back.NEVER place lap belt over or on top of your belly.Should I Adjust My Seat?YES—Adjust to a comfortable, upright position

    Source : www.nhtsa.gov

    Facts + Statistics: Highway safety

    Facts + Statistics: Highway safety

    Auto

    IN THIS FACTS + STATISTICS

    Lives saved by safety devices

    Motor vehicle crashes

    Traffic Deaths, 2011-2020

    Motor Vehicle Traffic Deaths By State, 2018-2019

    Drivers In Fatal Motor Vehicle Crashes By Age, 2019

    Sex Of Drivers Involved In Fatal Crashes, 2010-2019 (1)

    Driver Behavior

    Driving Behaviors Reported For Drivers And Motorcycle Operators Involved In Fatal Crashes, 2019

    Seatbelt Laws

    Fatal Crashes By First Harmful Event, Type Of Collision, 2019

    Motor vehicle crashes by time of year

    Holiday Driving, 2015-2019 (1)

    Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths By Month, 2019

    Distracted driving

    Fatal Crashes Involving Distracted Drivers, 2020

    Pedestrian fatalities

    Additional resources

    DOWNLOAD TO PDF

    The cost and crashworthiness of vehicles as well as drivers’ safety habits affect the cost of auto insurance. Out of concern for public safety and to help reduce the cost of crashes, insurers support safe driving initiatives. The insurance industry is a major supporter of anti-drunk driving and seatbelt usage campaigns.

    Lives saved by safety devices

    Airbags: Airbags are designed to inflate in moderate to severe frontal crashes. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the federal government has required auto manufacturers to install driver and passenger airbags for frontal protection in all cars since the 1999 model year. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) says that frontal airbags saved the lives of 2,790 occupants age 13 and older in 2017. Airbags, combined with seatbelts, are the most effective safety protection available for passenger vehicles. Seatbelts alone reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat passenger car occupants by 45 percent. The fatality-reducing effectiveness for frontal airbags is 14 percent when no seatbelt is used and 11 percent when a seatbelt is used in conjunction with airbags.Seatbelts: Among passenger vehicle occupants age five and older, seatbelts saved an estimated 14,955 lives in 2017. In fatal crashes in 2017, about 83 percent of passenger vehicle occupants who were totally ejected from the vehicle were killed. NHTSA says that when used seat belts reduce the risk of fatal injury to front seat passenger car occupants by 45 percent and the risk of moderate-to-critical injury by 50 percent. For light truck occupants, the risk is reduced by 60 percent and 65 percent, respectively.Child safety seats: NHTSA says that in 2017 the lives of an estimated 325 children under the age of five were saved by restraints.Motorcycle helmets: NHTSA estimates that helmets saved the lives of 1,872 motorcyclists in 2017. If all motorcyclists had worn helmets, an additional 749 lives could have been saved.

    Helmets are estimated to be 37 percent effective in preventing fatal injuries to motorcycle riders and 41 percent for motorcycle passengers. In other words, for every 100 motorcycle riders killed in crashes while not wearing a helmet, 37 of them could have been saved had all 100 worn helmets.

    Electronic stability control: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) requires all vehicles manufactured after model year 2012 to have electronic stability control (ESC). All new passenger cars, light trucks, SUVs and vans must comply with the requirement. ESC was designed to help prevent rollovers and other types of crashes by controlling brakes and engine power.

    NHTSA says ESC saved about 1,949 passenger car occupant lives in 2015 including 857 passenger car occupants, and 1,091 lives among light truck and van occupants. The 2015 total for lives compares with 1,575 lives saved in 2014 and 1,380 lives saved in 2013. Over the five years from 2011 to 2015, NHTSA says the ESC has saved a total of more than 7,000 lives.

    Motor vehicle crashes

    2021: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a statistical projection of traffic fatalities for the first half of 2021 that shows an 18.4 percent increase in the number of Americans who died in motor vehicle crashes compared to the same six-month period in 2020. This increase follows the estimated 7.2 percent increase in crash deaths recorded in 2020, see below. The 2021 first half increase was the highest number for the first six months period since 2006 and the highest half-year percentage increase on record. NHTSA also noted that crash deaths in the second quarter of 2021 were the highest for a second quarter since 1990 an the highest quarterly percent change, 23 percent, in history. Early data also show that vehicle miles traveled (VMT) in the first half of 2021 rose about 13.0 percent, compared with the first half of 2020. The fatality rate for the first half of 2021 increased to 1.34 fatalities per 100 million VMT, up from the estimated rate of 1.28 fatalities per 100 million VMT in the first half of 2020. However, the fatality rate in the second quarter of 2021 fell, which represents the first decline in year-to-year quarterly fatality rates the fourth quarter of 2019.2020: A statistical projection of traffic fatalities for 2020 from NHTSA shows that an estimated 38,680 people died in motor vehicle traf­fic crashes, up 7.2 percent from 36,096 fatalities in 2019. The increase in fatalities occurred despite vehicle miles traveled falling about 13.2 percent in 2020 from a year prior as stay-at-home orders due to the COVID-19 pandemic were in effect. As a result the fatality rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled soared to 1.37 from 1.11 in 2019 to the highest level since 2007. According to the Triple-I the increase in traffic fatalities per 100 vehicle miles traveled was likely caused by faster driving.

    Source : www.iii.org

    Seat Belts

    Seat belts are estimated to have saved 374,276 lives from 1975 to 2017. NHTSA estimates that seat belts reduce the risk of font seat passenger deaths by 45%.

    Seat Belts

    Brief Data Details

    From 1975 to 2017, seat belts are estimated to have saved 374,276 lives. More recent estimates are unavailable. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimates that using lap and shoulder seat belts reduces the risk of:

    Front seat passenger car occupant deaths by 45%

    Front seat passenger car occupant moderate to critical injuries by 50%

    Front seat light truck occupant deaths by 60%

    Front seat light truck occupant moderate to critical injuries by 65%

    ChartData Table

    Cumulative lives saved by seat belts

    Chart with 2 data series.

    Lives saved from 1975 to 2017: 374,276

    The chart has 1 X axis displaying categories.

    The chart has 1 Y axis displaying Lives saved. Data ranges from 241865 to 374276.

    Lives saved

    Cumulative lives saved by seat belts

    Current year Previous years 1975 to 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 0 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000

    © 2022 National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

    Lives saved from 1975 to 2017: 374,276

    End of interactive chart.

    During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic it appears that seat belt use was negatively impacted. The percent of unrestrained passenger vehicle occupant deaths increased from 46.6% in 2019 to 51% in 2020. However, even with this setback, the data clearly reflects the safety impact of seat belt use. In 2000, only 70.7% of front seat passengers were observed using seat belts, and 60.2% of occupant deaths were unrestrained. The latest 2020 data show that seat belt use is at 90.3%, and unrestrained occupant deaths currently account for 51% of deaths.

    Seat belt use estimates come from the National Occupant Protection Use Survey (NOPUS), conducted annually by NHTSA. NOPUS includes the observation of drivers and right-front passengers of passenger vehicles with no commercial or governmental markings.

    ChartData Table

    National Seat Belt Use Percentage and Percentage of Known Unrestrained Passenger Vehicle Occupant Deaths

    Line chart with 2 lines.

    The chart has 1 X axis displaying values. Data ranges from 2000 to 2021.

    The chart has 1 Y axis displaying values. Data ranges from 46.6 to 90.7.

    Belt use percent

    Daytime percent unrestrained passenger vehicle occupant fatalities

    2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 0% 25% 50% 75% 100%

    © 2022 National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

    National Seat Belt Use Percentage and Percentage of Known Unrestrained Passenger Vehicle Occupant Deaths

    End of interactive chart.

    The youngest and oldest victims experience the smallest percent of unrestrained passenger vehicle occupant deaths; 32% of deaths among children age 0 to 4 are unrestrained, while 29% of deaths among adults 75 and older are unrestrained. This compares sharply with the 25- to 34-age group, which experiences 61% unrestrained deaths.

    ChartData Table

    Percentage of Passenger Vehicle Occupants Who Were Killed and Unrestrained by Age Group, 2020

    Bar chart with 11 bars.

    The chart has 1 X axis displaying Age Group.

    The chart has 1 Y axis displaying values. Data ranges from 29 to 61.

    Age Group 0 to 4 5 to 9 10 to 15 16 to 20 21 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55 to 64 65 to 74 75 and older 0% 20% 40% 60% 80%

    © 2022 National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

    Percentage of Passenger Vehicle Occupants Who Were Killed and Unrestrained by Age Group, 2020

    End of interactive chart.

    The infographic below helps quantify the benefits of using seat belts/restraints, and reveals the higher proportion of unrestrained deaths among males and of unrestrained deaths at night versus daytime.

    ChartData Table

    How to Use Injury Facts® Charts and Tables

    Occupants Who Died Restrained (49.04%)

    Unrestrained (50.96%)

    Occupants Who Survived

    Restrained (84.32%)

    Unrestrained (15.68%)

    Male Occupants Who Died

    Restrained (45.01%)

    Unrestrained (54.99%)

    Female Occupants Who Died

    Restrained (56.96%)

    Unrestrained (43.04%)

    Occupant restraints improvechances of survivalOCCUPANT PROTECTION FACTS - 2020OCCUPANT PROTECTION FACTS - 2020

    Deaths at night Restrained (41.72%)

    Unrestrained (58.28%)

    Deaths in daytime Restrained (56.33%)

    Unrestrained (43.67%)

    Males are more likely to die unrestrainedUnrestrained deaths are more likelyat night(Passenger vehicles)Sources:

    National Center for Statistics and Analysis. (2021, February). Seat belt use in 2020 – Overall results. (Traffic Safety Facts Research Note. Report No. DOT HS 813 072). Washington, DC: NHTSA.

    National Safety Council analysis of NHTSA Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) data.

    National Center for Statistics and Analysis. (2019, 2013, 2010, 2007). Lives saved in (2017, 2012, 2008, 2006) by restraint use and minimum-drinking-age laws (Traffic Safety Facts Crash Stats. Report No. DOT HS 812 683, 811 851, 811 153, 810 869). Washington, DC: NHTSA.

    Source : injuryfacts.nsc.org

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