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    Copyright

    LibGuides: Ethical Use of Information: Copyright

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    Ethical Use of Information: Copyright

    Intro Plagiarism Copyright Fair Use Multimedia Toggle Dropdown Showing DVDs/Videos

    What is copyright?

    Definition: The exclusive legal right, given to an originator or an assignee to print, publish, perform, film, or record literary, artistic, or musical material, and to authorize others to do the same.

    Is copyright a Law?

    Yes. The U.S. Copyright Law is a federal Law in the US Code Title 17.

    It is also a right guaranteed to U.S. citizens by the constitution in Article 1, Section 8, providing protection for the individual while enabling their work to benefit the nation.

    “The congress shall have Power to ….. promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive Right to their respective writings and discoveries.”

    Copyright Basics

    Copyright on Campus Video

    This video from the Copyright Clearance center explains copyright law and its impact on the academic institution’s use of intellectual property.

    Copyright Tutorial

    Copyright Crash Course Online Tutorial

    From the University of Texas, this course will help you learn about how ownership of copyrighted materials works, what is fair use, alternatives to fair use, and when and how to get permission to use someone else's materials.

    Copyright Guidelines @ UP

    Copyright Q & A from the UP Library

    Find answers to your copyright questions here

    What does this mean?

    US Copyright law gives the creator of a work the exclusive right to:

    Reproduce (make copies of ) the work; and

    Modify or prepare derivative works based on the work. (Examples of derivative works include translations, transforming printed works into musicals or films, rearrangements of scores, and any other recast, transformation or adaptation of a work); and

    Distribute the work in any format by sale, publication, license, rental, or for free; and

    Publicly perform or display the work; and

    Authorize others to exercise some or all of those rights

    All the material you create, including for course work, is copyright protected. Before anyone can copy, distribute, display, make a derivative work, or perform your work publicly, they must seek your permission.

    You must consider copyright law when putting information on a public website. This includes course materials provided by your professors, and any of your academic projects that use information, music, or images borrowed from another source. In those cases, you may need to secure permission from the copyright holder or see if the intended use qualifies for an exception such as “Fair Use.”

    Clark Library Books

    Copyright : what everyone needs to know

    Call Number: Available online

    The copyright zone: a legal guide for photographers and artists in the digital age

    Call Number: Book Stacks KF2042.P45 G74 2015

    Music Rights Unveiled: A Filmaker's Guide to Music Rights and Licensing

    Call Number: Available online

    Last Updated: Mar 29, 2022 12:58 PM

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    Chapter 8 Flashcards

    Start studying Chapter 8. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Chapter 8

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    copyright

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    the exclusive legal right, given to an originator or an assignee to print, publish, perform, film, or record literary, artistic, or musical material, and to authorize others to do the same.

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    intellectual property

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    A product of the intellect, such as an expressed idea or concept, that has commercial value.

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    1/21 Created by Joseph_Higgins79

    Terms in this set (21)

    copyright

    the exclusive legal right, given to an originator or an assignee to print, publish, perform, film, or record literary, artistic, or musical material, and to authorize others to do the same.

    intellectual property

    A product of the intellect, such as an expressed idea or concept, that has commercial value.

    license

    A clear way to define the copyright of your creative work so people know how it can be used.

    patent ... trademark

    A brand that has exclusive legal protection for both its brand name and its design

    - can't apply to generic phrases

    -duration: 5-10 yrs then renewal

    trade name

    a commercial, legal name under which a company does business

    trade secret

    A formula, device, idea, process, or other information used in a business that gives the owner a competitive advantage in the marketplace.

    dilution

    lessening the uniqueness of a trademark, and the basis for trademark infringement

    infringement

    the illegal use of someone's intellectual property, such as a copyright, patent, or trademark

    Trademark Infringement

    Unauthorized use of another's mark. The holder may recover damages and other remedies from the infringer.

    patent infringement

    Unauthorized use of another's patent. A patent holder may recover damages and other remedies against a patent infringer.

    copyright infringement

    A violation of the exclusive rights of a copyright holder, such as copying, distributing, or performing the copyright owner's work without permission unless the use is otherwise authorized by law.

    theft of trade secrets

    The Economic Espionage Act of 1996 makes theft of trade secrets, as well as knowingly buying or possessing another's trade secrets without the other's authorization, a federal crime.

    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

    Office of the federal government responsible for issuing, administering, and enforcing U.S. patents and trademarks.

    public domain

    Creative work that's not copyrighted and therefore free for you to use whenever you want.

    design patent

    a patent that offers protection for the way a product looks

    -duration: 14 yrs from issuance

    plant patent

    Patent that protects the invention or discovery of asexually reproduced varieties of plants for 20 years.

    -duration: 20 yrs from filing date

    utility patent

    a property right awarded for a new and non-obvious process, machine, or composition of matter that has a useful function

    -duration: 20 yrs from filing date

    first to file rule

    Rule that stipulates that the first person to file a patent on an invention receives the patent even though some other party was the first to invent the invention.

    Uniform Trade Secrets Act

    Protects employers from having former employees take trade secrets to new employer

    Requirements to Patent:

    usefulness, statutory classes, novelty, not obvious, ownership

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    What is copyright? the exclusive legal right, given to an originator or an assignee to print, publish, perform, film, or record literary, artistic, or.

    What works are protected by copyright? Copyrightable works include the following: literary works. musical works, including any accompanying words. dramatic works, including any accompanying music. pantomimes and choreographic works. pictorial, graphic and sculptural works. motion pictures and other audiovisual works. sound recordings. architectural works.

    What is copyright? the exclusive legal right, given to an originator or an assignee to print, publish, perform, film, or record literary, artistic, or.

    Published byCameron Carr

    Modified over 6 years ago

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    Presentation on theme: "What is copyright? the exclusive legal right, given to an originator or an assignee to print, publish, perform, film, or record literary, artistic, or."— Presentation transcript:

    1 What is copyright? the exclusive legal right, given to an originator or an assignee to print, publish, perform, film, or record literary, artistic, or musical material, and to authorize others to do the same.

    2 What works are protected by copyright?

    Copyrightable works include the following: literary works. musical works, including any accompanying words. dramatic works, including any accompanying music. pantomimes and choreographic works. pictorial, graphic and sculptural works. motion pictures and other audiovisual works. sound recordings. architectural works.

    3 What works are not protected by copyright?

    Works that have not been fixed in a tangible form of expression (for example, choreographic works that have not been notated or recorded, or improvisational speeches or performances that have not been written or recorded) Titles, names, short phrases, and slogans; familiar symbols or designs; mere variations of typographic ornamentation, lettering, or coloring; mere listings of ingredients or contents Ideas, procedures, methods, systems, processes, concepts, principles, discoveries, or devices, as distinguished from a description, explanation, or illustration Works consisting entirely of information that is common property and containing no original authorship (for example: standard calendars, height and weight charts, tape measures and rulers, and lists or tables taken from public documents or other common sources)

    4 Who owns a copyright in a work?

    The copyright in a work of authorship immediately becomes the property of the author who created it at the moment it is put into fixed form. No one but the author can claim copyright to the work, unless the author grants rights to others in a written agreement (such as to the author's publisher or record company). Usually, you can tell who the author of a work is -- the person who created it. But sometimes, it is not quite that easy.

    5 fair use? (in US copyright law) the doctrine that brief excerpts of copyright material may, under certain circumstances, be quoted verbatim for purposes such as criticism, news reporting, teaching, and research, without the need for permission from or payment to the copyright holder.

    6 What are “derivative works”?

    A derivative work is a work based on or derived from one or more already exist- ing works. Common derivative works include translations, musical arrange- ments, motion picture versions of literary material or plays, art reproductions, abridgments, and condensations of preexisting works.

    7 What is a “royalty”? a sum of money paid to a patentee for the use of a patent or to an author or composer for each copy of a book sold or for each public performance of a work.

    8 What is copyright infringement and what are the consequences?

    Copyright infringement is the act of violating any of a copyright owner’s exclusive rights granted by the federal Copyright Act. There are three elements that must be in place in order for the infringement to occur. The copyright holder must have a valid copyright. The person who is allegedly infringing must have access to the copyrighted work. The duplication of the copyrighted work must be outside the exceptions. The legal penalties for copyright infringement are: Infringer pays the actual dollar amount of damages and profits. The law provides a range from $200 to $150,000 for each work infringed. Infringer pays for all attorneys fees and court costs. The Court can issue an injunction to stop the infringing acts. The Court can impound the illegal works. The infringer can go to jail.

    9 When do I need permission to use works?

    Obtaining copyright permission is the process of getting consent from a copyright owner to use the owner’s creative material. Obtaining permission is often called “licensing”; when you have permission, you have a license to use the work. Permission is often (but not always) required because of intellectual property laws that protect creative works such as text, artwork, or music. (These laws are explained in more detail in the next section.) If you use a copyrighted work without the appropriate permission, you may be violating — or “infringing” — the owner’s rights to that work. Infringing someone else’s copyright may subject you to legal action. As if going to court weren’t bad enough, you could be forced to stop using the work or pay money damages to the copyright owner.

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