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    Peristalsis

    Peristalsis is a series of wave-like muscle contractions that move food through the digestive tract. It starts in the esophagus where strong wave-like motions of the smooth muscle move balls of swallowed

    Peristalsis

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    Overview

    Peristalsis is a series of wave-like muscle contractions that move food through the digestive tract. It starts in the esophagus where strong wave-like motions of the smooth muscle move balls of swallowed food to the stomach. There, the food is churned into a liquid mixture called chyme that moves into the small intestine where peristalsis continues.

    Stretching out a piece of intestine will make it easier to see the wave-like motion. The motion mixes and shifts the chyme back and forth. This lets the bloodstream absorb nutrients through the walls of the small intestine.

    In the large intestine peristalsis helps water from undigested food be absorbed into the blood stream. Then, the remaining waste products are excreted through the rectum and anus.

    Review Date 8/13/2020

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    What are involuntary muscle contractions that move a bolus through the gastrointestinal tract called?

    Answer to: What are involuntary muscle contractions that move a bolus through the gastrointestinal tract called?

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    What are involuntary muscle contractions that move a bolus through the gastrointestinal tract...

    What are involuntary muscle contractions that move a bolus through the gastrointestinal tract... Question:

    What are involuntary muscle contractions that move a bolus through the gastrointestinal tract called?

    The Gastrointestinal Tract:

    The gastrointestinal tract begins at the mouth and ends at the anus, passing through the esophagus, stomach, and intestines in between. This organ system is responsible for digesting food.

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    The involuntary muscle contractions that move a bolus through the gastrointestinal tract are called peristalsis. Peristaltic muscle contractions...

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    Movement Through the Small Intestine: Peristalsis, Segmentation & Pendular Movement

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    Chapter 17 / Lesson 5

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    Understand small intestine segmentation. Explore the secretions, contractions, and movements of small intestines. Discover peristalsis and pendular movements.

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    Propulsion and Peristalsis

    Peristalsis creates propulsion: How food moves through the alimentary canal.

    Peristalsis Creates Propulsion: How Food Moves Through the Alimentary Canal

    © 2022 Visible Body

    Esophagus

    The esophagus is the narrowest part of the alimentary canal.

    The alimentary canal is a single continuous tube that includes the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. After food is chewed, made into a bolus, and swallowed, the action of the epiglottis routes the bolus into the esophagus. From there, peristaltic waves propel ingested foodstuffs through the alimentary canal.

    1. The Epiglottis Directs Swallowed Foodstuffs Down the Esophagus

    The respiratory and digestive systems share structures in the back of the oral cavity that connect with both the trachea (of the respiratory system) and the esophagus (of the digestive system). What prevents swallowed food from “going down the wrong pipe”? With each swallow a structure called the epiglottis closes over respiratory structures. The swallowed bolus stays on course and is directed toward the esophagus. One peristaltic wave can be enough to move a bolus down the esophagus and into the stomach.

    2. Peristalsis Is the Contraction of Muscle Tissue That Helps Move and Break Down Foodstuffs

    The walls of the alimentary canal include layers of smooth muscle controlled by the autonomic nervous system. Alternating contraction and relaxation of these muscles is called peristalsis. Peristaltic waves push the swallowed bolus down the esophagus. In the stomach, peristalsis churns swallowed food, mixing it with gastric juices. These mechanical and chemical actions further break down food into a substance called chyme. It takes about a minute to chew a piece of food into a bolus and a few seconds to swallow it. Once in the stomach foodstuffs take a few hours to become chyme.

    3. Peristaltic Waves Move Nutrients and Waste Through the Intestines

    Most nutrient absorption from the foods we eat occurs in the small intestine. When chyme passes from the stomach into the small intestine, peristaltic waves shift it back and forth and mix it with digestive enzymes and fluids. Nutrients from the chyme are absorbed into the bloodstream through the intestinal walls Peristaltic waves in the small intestine are smaller and more regular, pushing the chyme for 3 to 6 hours before passing it to the large intestine where any final absorption takes place. Peristaltic waves help compact and move waste and indigestible foodstuffs through the large intestine for elimination.

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    External Sources

    An article on the physiology of peristalsis from StatPearls.

    An overview of peristalsis and its role in several digestive system pathologies, from Verywell Health.

    Visible Body Web Suite contains animations detailing normal physiology and common pathologies.

    Source : www.visiblebody.com

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