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    ten students need to present their reports. five can present each day. how many ways can the teacher choose a group of five students to present their reports on the first day? how many ways can the teacher choose a group of 5 students to present on the first day if marjorie must present on the first day?

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get ten students need to present their reports. five can present each day. how many ways can the teacher choose a group of five students to present their reports on the first day? how many ways can the teacher choose a group of 5 students to present on the first day if marjorie must present on the first day? from EN Bilgi.

    Ten students need to present their reports. Five can present each day. How many ways can the teacher choose a group of five students to present their reports on the first day?

    Ten students need to present their reports. Five can present each day. How many ways can the teacher choose a group of five students to present their reports on the first day? How many ways can the teacher choose a group of 5 students to present on the first day if Marjorie must present on the first day? None

    Asked by jmdavis

    mathematics answered out

    Ten students need to present their reports. Five can present each day. How many ways can the teacher choose a group of five students to present their reports on the first day?

    How many ways can the teacher choose a group of 5 students to present on the first day if Marjorie must present on the first day? None

    7 months ago

    Answers

    Solution:There are a total of 10 student.when Teacher is supposed to choose 5 Students randomly from the group of 10.The selection can be done in when Teacher is supposed to choose 5 Students randomly from the group of 10, if Marjorie must present on the first day.The number of ways

    Answerd by bmgonzales

    7 months ago 192 4.4

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    Finding Outcomes Flashcards

    Start studying Finding Outcomes. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Finding Outcomes

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    Three students, Angie, Bradley, and Carnell, are being selected for three student council offices: president, vice president, and treasurer. In each arrangement below, the first initial of each person's name represents that person's position, with president listed first, vice president second, and treasurer third. Which shows the possible outcomes for the event?

    a- ABC b- ABC, BAC, CBA c- AAA, BBB, CCC

    d- ABC, ACB, BCA, BAC, CAB, CBA

    Click card to see definition 👆

    d- ABC, ACB, BCA, BAC, CAB, CBA

    Click again to see term 👆

    The number of ways six people can be placed in a line for a photo can be determined using the expression 6!. What is the value of 6!?

    Two of the six people are given responsibilities during the photo shoot. One person holds a sign and the other person points to the sign. The expression represents the number of ways the two people can be chosen from the group of six. In how many ways can this happen?

    In the next photo, three of the people are asked to sit in front of the other people. The expression represents the number of ways the group can be chosen. In how many ways can the group be chosen?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    a- 720 b- 30 c- 20

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/9 Created by shyupshyup

    Terms in this set (9)

    Three students, Angie, Bradley, and Carnell, are being selected for three student council offices: president, vice president, and treasurer. In each arrangement below, the first initial of each person's name represents that person's position, with president listed first, vice president second, and treasurer third. Which shows the possible outcomes for the event?

    a- ABC b- ABC, BAC, CBA c- AAA, BBB, CCC

    d- ABC, ACB, BCA, BAC, CAB, CBA

    d- ABC, ACB, BCA, BAC, CAB, CBA

    The number of ways six people can be placed in a line for a photo can be determined using the expression 6!. What is the value of 6!?

    Two of the six people are given responsibilities during the photo shoot. One person holds a sign and the other person points to the sign. The expression represents the number of ways the two people can be chosen from the group of six. In how many ways can this happen?

    In the next photo, three of the people are asked to sit in front of the other people. The expression represents the number of ways the group can be chosen. In how many ways can the group be chosen?

    a- 720 b- 30 c- 20

    Eli chooses two shirts from a group of five to pack for a weekend trip. Let each shirt be represented by A, B, C, D, and E. Which statements about the situation are true? Check all that apply.

    a- The combination of AB and BA are the same.

    b- Each shirt can be paired with any one of other the remaining shirts.

    c- There are twenty possible ways to choose the group of shirts.

    d- He has five choices for the first shirt and five choices for the second shirt.

    e- If he chooses shirt B, there are four possible outcomes for choosing the second shirt.

    a- The combination of AB and BA are the same.

    b- Each shirt can be paired with any one of other the remaining shirts.

    e- If he chooses shirt B, there are four possible outcomes for choosing the second shirt.

    A librarian chooses seven holiday books from a selection of ten to be displayed in the window of the library. In how many different ways can she choose the group of seven books?

    120

    In how many ways can the letters in the word balloon be arranged?

    a- 210 b- 1,260 c- 2,520 d- 5,040 b- 1,260

    Ten students need to present their reports. Five can present each day. How many ways can the teacher choose a group of five students to present their reports on the first day?

    How many ways can the teacher choose a group of 5 students to present on the first day if Marjorie must present on the first day?

    a- 252 b- 126

    At a gymnastics meet, twenty gymnasts compete for first, second, and third place. How many ways can first, second, and third place be assigned?

    Third place has been announced. In how many ways can the remaining two places be assigned?

    Third and second places have been announced. In how many ways can first place be assigned?

    a- 6,840 b- 342 c- 18

    Juan is making a fruit salad. He has grapes, watermelon, apples, pineapple, bananas, mangoes, honeydew, and cantaloupe. He wants his fruit salad to contain five different fruits. How many ways can he make the fruit salad if it must contain watermelon?

    a- 21 b- 35 c- 56 d- 70 b- 35

    Lorelei evaluates the expression to determine how many different groups of ten she can make out of twelve items. Her solution:

    1). Subtract within parentheses and simplify: 6!/(2)!5!

    2). Expand: 6∙5∙4∙3∙2∙1/2∙1∙5∙4∙3∙2∙1

    3). Divide out common factors: 6/2∙1

    4). Because 6 divided by 2∙1 is 3, there are 3 ways to choose the groups.

    Which statements describe Lorelei's solution? Check all that apply

    a- Her work is correct.

    b- Her answer is correct.

    c- In step 1, the subtraction cannot be completed before the factorial of each number is calculated.

    d- In step 1, 12! divided by 10! is not equivalent to 6! divided by 5!.

    e- In step 3, the dividing out of common factors was performed incorrectly.

    Source : quizlet.com

    4 Assessing to Support Mathematics Learning

    Read chapter 4 Assessing to Support Mathematics Learning: To achieve national goals for education, we must measure the things that really count. Measuri...

    Measuring What Counts: A Conceptual Guide for Mathematics Assessment (1993)

    Measuring What Counts: A Conceptual Guide for Mathematics Assessment (1993) Chapter:4 Assessing to Support Mathematics Learning

    Get This Book

    « Previous: 3 Assessing Important Mathematical Content

    Page 67

    Suggested Citation:"4 Assessing to Support Mathematics Learning." National Research Council. 1993. Measuring What Counts: A Conceptual Guide for Mathematics Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2235.

    ×

    4ASSESSING TO SUPPORT MATHEMATICS LEARNING

    High-quality mathematics assessment must focus on the interaction of assessment with learning and teaching. This fundamental concept is embodied in the second educational principle of mathematics assessment.

    THE LEARNING PRINCIPLE

    Assessment should enhance mathematics learning and support good instructional practice.

    This principle has important implications for the nature of assessment. Primary among them is that assessment should be seen as an integral part of teaching and learning rather than as the culmination of the process.1 As an integral part, assessment provides an opportunity for teachers and students alike to identify areas of understanding and misunderstanding. With this knowledge, students and teachers can build on the understanding and seek to transform misunderstanding into significant learning. Time spent on assessment will then contribute to the goal of improving the mathematics learning of all students.

    The applicability of the learning principle to assessments created and used by teachers and others directly involved in classrooms is relatively straightforward. Less obvious is the applicability of the principle to assessments created and imposed by parties outside the classroom. Tradition has allowed and even encouraged some assessments to serve accountability or monitoring purposes without sufficient regard for their impact on student learning.

    A portion of assessment in schools today is mandated by external authorities and is for the general purpose of accountability of the schools. In 1990, 46 states had mandated testing programs, as

    Page 68

    Suggested Citation:"4 Assessing to Support Mathematics Learning." National Research Council. 1993. Measuring What Counts: A Conceptual Guide for Mathematics Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2235.

    ×

    compared with 20 in 1980.2 Such assessments have usually been multiple-choice norm-referenced tests. Several researchers have studied these testing programs and judged them to be inconsistent with the current goals of mathematics education.3 Making mandated assessments consonant with the content, learning, and equity principles will require much effort.

    Instruction and assessment—from whatever source and for whatever purpose—must support one another.

    Studies have documented a further complication as teachers are caught between the conflicting demands of mandated testing programs and instructional practices they consider more appropriate. Some have resorted to "double-entry" lessons in which they supplement regular course instruction with efforts to teach the objectives required by the mandated test.4 During a period of change there will undoubtedly be awkward and difficult examples of discontinuities between newer and older directions and procedures. Instructional practices may move ahead of assessment practices in some situations, whereas in other situations assessment practices could outpace instruction. Neither situation is desirable although both will almost surely occur. However, still worse than such periods of conflict would be to continue either old instructional forms or old assessment forms in the name of synchrony, thus stalling movement of either toward improving important mathematics learning.

    From the perspective of the learning principle, the question of who mandated the assessment and for what purpose is not the primary issue. Instruction and assessment—from whatever source and for whatever purpose—must be integrated so that they support one another.

    To satisfy the learning principle, assessment must change in ways consonant with the current changes in teaching, learning, and curriculum. In the past, student learning was often viewed as a passive process whereby students remembered what teachers told them to remember. Consistent with this view, assessment was often thought of as the end of learning. The student was assessed on something taught previously to see if he or she remembered it. Similarly, the mathematics curriculum was seen as a fragmented collection of information given meaning by the teacher.

    This view led to assessment that reinforced memorization as a principal learning strategy. As a result, students had scant oppor-

    Page 69

    Suggested Citation:"4 Assessing to Support Mathematics Learning." National Research Council. 1993. Measuring What Counts: A Conceptual Guide for Mathematics Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2235.

    ×

    tunity to bring their intuitive knowledge to bear on new concepts and tended to memorize rules rather than understand symbols and procedures.5 This passive view of learning is not appropriate for the mathematics students need to master today. To develop mathematical competence, students must be involved in a dynamic process of thinking mathematically, creating and exploring methods of solution, solving problems, communicating their understanding—not simply remembering things. Assessment, therefore, must reflect and reinforce this view of the learning process.

    Source : nap.nationalacademies.org

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