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    sweden and finland were invited to join nato after which nation agreed to drop its objections?

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    NATO Formally Invites Finland and Sweden to Join the Alliance

    The historic deal underscores how the war in Ukraine has backfired for President Vladimir V. Putin.

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    Source : www.nytimes.com

    Finland and Sweden set for invite to join NATO after Turkey drops opposition

    A new "memorandum of understanding" between the three countries seeks to allay Turkish fears over security.

    EUROPE NEWS

    Finland and Sweden set for invite to join NATO after Turkey drops opposition

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    By David Mac Dougall  & Euronews  with AP, AFP  •   29/06/2022

    Turkish President Erdogan shakes hands with Swedish PM and Finnish President in Madrid, 28 June 2022   -   Copyright  AP Photo

    Finland and Sweden have struck a deal with Turkey that sees Ankara drop its objections to the two Nordic countries joining NATO.

    In a statement, Turkish President Erdogan said he had obtained “full cooperation” from Finland and Sweden against Kurdish PKK fighters and their allies, after more than three hours of discussions on Tuesday in Madrid, on the sidelines of the NATO summit.

    After the talks, NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said “we now have an agreement that paves the way for Finland and Sweden to join NATO.”

    Russian President Vladimir Putin "is getting more NATO on his borders", the alliance chief said.

    "So what he gets is the opposite of what he actually demanded, and that was to NATO to close its doors. We are demonstrating that NATO's doors are open. NATO's door is open."

    "As a result of that meeting, our foreign ministers signed a trilateral memorandum which confirms that Turkey will at the Madrid Summit this week support the invitation of Finland and Sweden to become members of NATO," Finland's President Sauli Niinistö said in a statement released by his office.

    "One step forward," Niinistö later wrote on his personal Twitter account.

    Finnish Minister of Defence Antti Kaikkonen said: "Today saw the power of diplomacy and negotiation."

    "There is still a long way to go, but we are going there," he added.

    What were the issues Turkey raised?

    Turkey had raised a laundry list of grievances with Finland and Sweden which they wanted to be cleared up before agreeing to lift their block on NATO membership.

    And it seems the two Nordic nations have given in to Turkish demands, which included preventing recruitment, fundraising, and propaganda activities of the Kurdish PKK group.

    Turkey also wanted the extradition of more than 30 people by Finnish and Swedish authorities -- some are alleged PKK activists, while others are alleged members of the so-called Gülenist movement which Erdogan believes was behind a 2016 attempt to overthrow him.

    Turkey said it had “got what it wanted” including “full cooperation [...] in the fight against” the rebel groups.

    "Finland and Sweden, of course, are ready to work with Turkey on the pending deportations or extradition requests of terror suspected individuals," NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said.

    "But at the same time that this extradition process will take place in accordance with the European Convention on Extradition, I mean, this is, of course, in respect of the rule of law, the legal systems in these countries."

    The latest opinion polling in Finland, released on Monday, showed little appetite to give in to Turkish demands ahead of the NATO summit.

    A survey for Helsingin Sanomat newspaper found a clear 70% of Finns don't think there should be any change in legislation, or a change in principles, to appease Turkey.

    Only 14% thought Finland should accede to the Turkish demands.

    Turkey's president warns of 'security risks' if Finland and Sweden join NATO

    NATO expansion: Moves to admit Finland and Sweden 'will likely drag on' amid objections from Turkey

    The toughest position on Turkey was taken by supporters of the Greens and Left Alliance political parties, while far-right Finns Party supporters were the most willing to make concessions.

    The same poll found that 79% of Finns are now in favour of NATO membership -- a record high since polling first began on this subject more than two decades ago -- with 10% against joining NATO, and 11% unsure.

    Source : www.euronews.com

    Turkey has dropped its objections to Finland and Sweden joining NATO : NPR

    NATO leades say Turkey has dropped its objection to Finland and Sweden being invited into the alliance — one of the most significant reactions by the West so far to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

    World

    Turkey has dropped its objections to Finland and Sweden joining NATO

    June 28, 20226:09 PM ET

    Heard on All Things Considered

    FRANK LANGFITT Twitter Facebook Instagram 3-Minute Listen

    NATO leades say Turkey has dropped its objection to Finland and Sweden being invited into the alliance — one of the most significant reactions by the West so far to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

    ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

    A proverbial cloud had been hanging over a pivotal NATO summit this week in Madrid, and at the last moment, it lifted. Turkey has dropped its objections to Finland and Sweden joining the alliance. This comes as NATO plans to announce major troop deployments to Eastern Europe to deter Russia. NPR's Frank Langfitt is in Madrid. Hi, Frank.

    FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: Hey, Ari.

    SHAPIRO: Tell us about the significance of this deal.

    LANGFITT: Yeah, a lot of it's the timing. You know, this is the biggest NATO summit in at least a couple of decades, and there's big political symbolism. I mean, this is basically a rebuke to President Vladimir Putin, the Russian president. You know, he said one of the reasons he invaded Ukraine, Ari, of course, was to stop it from joining NATO. And at a news conference this evening, the secretary general of NATO, Jens Stoltenberg, had this to say.

    (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

    JENS STOLTENBERG: One of the most important messages from President Putin there was that he was against any further NATO enlargement. He wanted less NATO. Now President Putin is getting more NATO on these borders. So what he gets is the opposite of what he actually demanded.

    SHAPIRO: Frank, why did Turkey object to the expansion, and why did Turkey change its mind?

    LANGFITT: Yeah. Turkey said it had nothing to do with NATO. It had been complaining for some time about - basically from its perspective - Sweden and Finland weren't doing enough to combat people that Turkey views as terrorists. Now, this relates to supporters of the Kurdistan Workers' Party, which is recognized as a terrorist organization by Turkey, the U.S. and the EU. And it's been very active in southeastern Turkey, northern Iraq and Syria.

    Now, in their memorandum today, the Nordic countries agreed to prevent activities by the party, which is also known as the PKK, and entered into an extradition agreement with Turkey to turn over potential suspects that it says has links to the - that Turkey thinks has links to the PKK and who they say have been finding refuge in Sweden and Finland. And Stoltenberg was very interesting. He went out of his way to acknowledge Turkey's concerns.

    (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

    STOLTENBERG: No ally has suffered more brutal terrorist attacks than Turkey, including from the terrorist group PKK.

    SHAPIRO: And that was all that was required for Turkey to drop its objections?

    LANGFITT: Well, officially, Ari, yes. But there were a lot of - just a lot of smiles in the press conference today - people kind of looking around because people think there's something else going on here. Many people have thought that Turkey was really holding this up - Sweden and Finland - in hopes of getting the U.S. to agree to sell it fighter jets, which Turkey has wanted for a long time. Now, President Biden did talk to Turkey's President Erdogan today, but senior administration officials said that the U.S. made no direct offer to get Turkey on board. Biden is expected to meet Erdogan tomorrow here at the summit.

    SHAPIRO: This deal gives the impression of a unified, growing NATO alliance. Is that image entirely accurate?

    LANGFITT: No, it's a lot more complicated. Remember, this is 30 allies. It's hard for them always to agree. And each, you know, each country in Europe has a slightly different point of view. There are disagreements, and have been for a number of months, over the types of weapons NATO should be sending to Ukraine, concerns - some allies think that, you know, if you send them very heavy weapons, long-range missiles, it could escalate and widen the war. Another question is whether to back Ukraine indefinitely or push for a negotiated settlement in which Ukraine gives up land to Russia, which, of course, Ukraine absolutely does not want. And this is one reason I think, Ari, that a deal like this coming right now is very helpful to the alliance because it does present this image of strength and unity.

    SHAPIRO: That is NPR's Frank Langfitt covering the NATO summit in Madrid. Thanks, Frank.

    LANGFITT: Hey, great to talk, Ari.

    (SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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