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    sperm are temporarily stored in the __________ until they are fully mature.

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    Sperm release pathway

    Sperm are produced and released by the male reproductive organs.

    Sperm release pathway

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    Overview

    Sperm are produced and released by the male reproductive organs.

    The testes are where sperm are produced. The testes are linked to the rest of the male reproductive organs by the vas deferens, which extends over the base of the pelvic bone or ilium, and wraps around to the ampulla, seminal vesicle, and prostate. The urethra then runs from the bladder through the penis.

    Sperm production in the testes takes place in coiled structures called seminiferous tubules.

    Along the top of each testicle is the epididymis. This is a cordlike structure where the sperm mature and are stored.

    The release process starts when the penis fills with blood and becomes erect. Continuing to stimulate the penis will cause an ejaculation.

    Mature sperm begin their journey by travelling from the epididymis to the vas deferens, which propels sperm forward with smooth muscle contractions.

    The sperm arrive first at the ampulla just above the prostate gland. Here, secretions from the seminal vesicle located next to the ampulla are added.

    Next, the seminal fluid is propelled forward through the ejaculatory ducts toward the urethra. As it passes the prostate gland, a milky fluid is added to make semen.

    Finally, the semen is ejaculated from the penis through the urethra.

    Review Date 10/3/2021

    Review Date 10/3/2021 Related MedlinePlus Health Topics

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    Source : medlineplus.gov

    Duct System

    Duct System

    Sperm cells pass through a series of ducts to reach the outside of the body. After they leave the testes, the sperm passes through the epididymis, ductus deferens, ejaculatory duct, and urethra.

    Epididymis

    Sperm leave the testes through a series of efferent ducts that enter the epididymis. Each epididymis is a long (about 6 meters) tube that is tightly coiled to form a comma-shaped organ located along the superior and posterior margins of the testes. When the sperm leave the testes, they are immature and incapable of fertilizing ova. They complete their maturation process and become fertile as they move through the epididymis. Mature sperm are stored in the lower portion, or tail, of the epididymis.

    Ductus Deferens

    The ductus deferens, also called vas deferens, is a fibromuscular tube that is continuous ( or contiguous) with the epididymis. It begins at the bottom (tail) of the epididymis then turns sharply upward along the posterior margin of the testes. The ductus deferens enters the abdominopelvic cavity through the inguinal canal and passes along the lateral pelvic wall. It crosses over the ureter and posterior portion of the urinary bladder, and then descends along the posterior wall of the bladder toward the prostate gland. Just before it reaches the prostate gland, each ductus deferens enlarges to form an ampulla. Sperm are stored in the proximal portion of the ductus deferens, near the epididymis, and peristaltic movements propel the sperm through the tube.

    The proximal portion of the ductus deferens is a component of the spermatic cord, which contains vascular and neural structures that supply the testes. The spermatic cord contains the ductus deferens, testicular artery and veins, lymph vessels, testicular nerve, cremaster muscle that elevates the testes for warmth and at times of sexual stimulation, and a connective tissue covering.

    Ejaculatory Duct

    Each ductus deferens, at the ampulla, joins the duct from the adjacent seminal vesicle (one of the accessory glands) to form a short ejaculatory duct. Each ejaculatory duct passes through the prostate gland and empties into the urethra.

    Urethra

    The urethra extends from the urinary bladder to the external urethral orifice at the tip of the penis. It is a passageway for sperm and fluids from the reproductive system and urine from the urinary system. While reproductive fluids are passing through the urethra, sphincters contract tightly to keep urine from entering the urethra.

    The male urethra is divided into three regions. The prostatic urethra is the proximal portion that passes through the prostate gland. It receives the ejaculatory duct, which contains sperm and secretions from the seminal vesicles, and numerous ducts from the prostate glands. The next portion, the membranous urethra, is a short region that passes through the pelvic floor. The longest portion is the penile urethra (also called spongy urethra or cavernous urethra), which extends the length of the penis and opens to the outside at the external urethral orifice. The ducts from the bulbourethral glands open into the penile urethra.

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    Source : training.seer.cancer.gov

    scrotum

    epididyme, either of a pair of elongated crescent-shaped structures attached to each of the two male reproductive organs, the testes (see testis). Sperm cells produced in the testes are transported to the epididymes, where they mature and are stored. Each epididymis has three regions, called, respectively, the head, body, and tail. The head is the uppermost and largest part of the epididymis; it lies on the top surface of the testis. The body is attached to the anal side of the testis and extends the length of the gland. The smallest region is the tail, which begins at the point

    scrotum

    anatomy

    Alternate titles: scrotal sac

    By The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica • Edit History

    male reproductive system

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    Related Topics: testis spermatic cord hydrocele raphe male reproductive system

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    scrotum, in the male reproductive system, a thin external sac of skin that is divided into two compartments; each compartment contains one of the two testes, the glands that produce sperm, and one of the epididymides, where the sperm is stored. The scrotum is a unique anatomical feature of humans and certain other species of land-dwelling mammals. It is continuous with the skin of the lower abdomen and is located directly behind the penis and in front of the anus. The scrotal wall is a thin layer of skin lined with smooth muscle tissue (dartos fascia). The skin contains more pigment than that of surrounding areas and has many sebaceous (oil-producing) glands and sweat glands, as well as some hair. The two compartments of the scrotum are distinguished externally by a middle ridge called the raphe. Internally, the raphe connects to a muscular partition, the septum, which serves to divide the scrotum into its two areas.

    The function of the scrotum is to protect the testes and to keep them at a temperature several degrees below the normal body temperature. The scrotum thus protrudes from the body wall: moreover, it contracts from cold, exercise, or sexual stimulation and expands and relaxes when warm. When contracted, it conserves heat; while relaxed it is smooth and elongated, permitting the circulation of air that effects cooling. The relatively cool temperature of the scrotum is thought to be important for the production of viable sperm.

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    The muscle tone of the scrotum becomes weakened and relaxed in older men. In animals whose scrotum is always tight against the body, as in rats, boars, and stallions, the testes are cooled by the intricate blood system that surrounds them. Failure of the scrotum to cool the testes, which occurs during high fevers or, in some animals, during the hot summer months, causes temporary sterility.

    This article was most recently revised and updated by Kara Rogers.

    Source : www.britannica.com

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