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    “Sorry, But We Accidentally Ended The World In 2012” Admits CERN Scientists – Waterford Whispers News

    SCIENTISTS at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, have admitted today to ending the world as we know it back in 2012, while performing experiments into the Higgs boson particle, WWN can confirm. Speaking at the research …

    “Sorry, But We Accidentally Ended The World In 2012” Admits CERN Scientists

    January 16, 2018 - BREAKING NEWS, WORLD NEWS

    SCIENTISTS at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, have admitted today to ending the world as we know it back in 2012, while performing experiments into the Higgs boson particle, WWN can confirm.

    Speaking at the research facility in Switzerland today, several key scientists apologised for what they’re calling a “terrible accident that has only come to light now”.

    The particle discovery capped decades of theory and was an important triumph for the Large Hadron Collider, however, recent experiments carried out by the LHC team have confirmed that not only did they successfully observe a particle consistent with the Higgs boson, but they inadvertently shifted the entire planet into an alternate reality in doing so, ending the previous model.

    “Um, we’re really, really sorry about this whole mess, but we accidentally ended the world seven years ago,” CERN Director General Rolf-Dieter Heuer began, “yeah, we fucked up and we know it’s probably a lot to take in, but right now, none of us technically exist.

    “I’m not sure any of you noticed the strange goings-on over the past few years, but we’ve shifted into a parallel universe,” he told a now eerily silent media room, “Trump, the rise of the Kardashians, insane wars that don’t make sense, increasing UFO sightings, unpredictable weather patterns; it’s all our fault, and we’re incredibly sorry for the seven and a half billion people now living here”.

    The nervous looking team of scientists then warned off even more “crazy happenings” in the future, urging the planet’s population to remain vigilant in this delicate dimension.

    “Now, we’re not saying an invasion from strange alien beings is on the cards, but if you could prepare for that kind of thing, that would be great,” Heuer concluded, before hastily leaving the press conference under armed security.

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    Source : waterfordwhispersnews.com

    The day the world switched on to particle physics – CERN Courier

    What was it that drove one of the biggest media events science has ever seen, and is the LHC still able to capture the public imagination?

    EDUCATION AND OUTREACH

    FEATURE

    The day the world switched on to particle physics

    31 August 2018

    When the Large Hadron Collider circulated its first protons 10 years ago, it made headlines around the globe. What was it that drove one of the biggest media events science has ever seen, and is the LHC still able to capture the public imagination?

    CERN Control Centre

    When Lyn Evans, project leader of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), turned up for work at the CERN Control Centre (CCC) at 05:30 on 10 September 2008, he was surprised to find the car park full of satellite trucks. Normally a scene of calm, the facility had become the focus of global media attention, with journalists poised to capture the moment when the LHC switched on. Evans knew the media were coming, but not quite to this extent. A few hours later, as he counted down to the moment when the first beam had made its way through the last of the LHC’s eight sectors, the CCC erupted in cheers – and Evans wasn’t even aware that his impromptu commentary was being beamed live to millions of people. “I thought I was commenting to others on the CERN site,” he recalls. The following weekend, he was walking in the nearby ski town of Megève when a stranger recognised him in the street.

    Of all human endeavours that have captured the world’s attention, the events of 10 September 2008 are surely among the most bizarre. After all, this wasn’t something as tangible as sending a person to the Moon. At 10:28 local time on that clear autumn Wednesday, a bunch of subatomic particles made its way around a 27 km-long subterranean tube, and the spectacle was estimated to have reached an audience of more than a billion people. There were record numbers of hits to the CERN homepage, overtaking visits to NASA’s site, in addition to some 2500 television broadcasts and 6000 press articles on the day. The event was dubbed “first-beam day” by CERN and “Big Bang day” by the BBC, which had taken over a room in the CCC and devoted a full day’s coverage on Radio 4. Google turned its logo into a cartoon of a collider – such “doodles” are now commonplace, but it was a coup for CERN back then. It is hard to think of a bigger media event in science in recent times, and it launched particle physics, the LHC and CERN into mainstream culture.

    It is all the more incredible that no collision data, and therefore no physics results, were scheduled that day; it was “simply” part of the commissioning period that all new colliders go through. When CERN’s previous hadron collider, the Super Proton Synchrotron, fired up in the summer of 1981, says Evans, there was just him and Carlo Rubbia in the control room. Even the birth of the Large Electron Positron collider in 1989 was a muted affair. The LHC was a different machine in a different era, and its birth offers a crash course in the communication of big-science projects.

    News values

    Fears that the LHC would create a planet-eating black hole were a key factor behind the enormous media interest, says Roger Highfield, who was science editor of the UK’s newspaper at the time. “I have no doubt that the public loved all the stuff about the hunt for the secrets of the universe, the romance of the Peter Higgs story and the deluge of superlatives about energy, vacuum and all that,” says Highfield. “But the LHC narrative was taken to a whole new level by the potty claim by doomsayers that it could create a black hole to swallow the Earth. When ‘the biggest and most complex experiment ever devised’ was about to be turned on, it made front-page news, with headlines like, ‘Will the world end on Wednesday?’”.

    Journalists on the CERN site on first-beam day. Credit: CERN-HI-0809004-02

    The conspiracies were rooted in attempts by a handful of individuals to prevent the LHC from starting up in case its collisions would produce a microscopic black hole – one of the outlandish models that the LHC was built to test. That the protons injected into the LHC that day had an energy far lower than that of the then-operational Tevatron collider in the US, and that collisions were not scheduled for weeks afterwards, didn’t seem to get in the way of a good story. Nor, for that matter, did CERN’s efforts to issue scientific reassurances. Indeed, when science editor of , Ian Sample, turned up at CERN on first-beam day, he expected to find protestors chained to the fence outside, or at least waving placards asking physicists not to destroy the planet. “I did not see a single protestor – and I looked for them,” he says. “And yet, inside the building, I remember one TV host doing a piece to camera on how the world might end when the machine switched on. It was a circus that the media played a massive part in creating. It was shameful and it made the media who seriously ran with those stories look like fools.”

    The truth is the black-hole hype came long after the LHC had started to capture the public imagination. As the machine and its massive experiments progressed through construction in the early 2000s, the project’s scale and abstract scientific goals offered an appeal to wonder. Though designed to explore a range of phenomena at a new energy frontier, the LHC’s principal quarry, the Higgs boson, had a bite-sized description: the generator of mass. It also had a human angle – a real-life, white-haired Professor Higgs and a handful of other theorists waiting to see if their half-century-old prediction was right, and international teams of thousands working night and day to build the necessary equipment. Nobel laureate Leon Lederman’s 1993 book , detailing the quest for the Higgs boson, added a supernatural dimension to the enterprise.

    Source : cerncourier.com

    There's a conspiracy theory that the world ended in 2012 and it makes sense

    If you told someone in 2012 that property mogul Donald Trump would soon be President of the United States of America and that the United Kingdom would seemingly shoot themselves in the foot over Brexit, they'd probably have a hard time believing it.

    Home > Culture

    SOURCE: TWITTER

    There's a conspiracy theory that the world ended in 2012 and it makes sense

    BY MARK PYGAS

    MAY 29 2020, UPDATED 6:43 A.M. ET

    It's been a crazy few years for the world. If you told someone in 2012 that property mogul Donald Trump would soon be President of the United States of America and that the United Kingdom would seemingly shoot themselves in the foot over Brexit, they'd probably have a hard time believing it.

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    Fast forward seven years, and that's the world we find ourselves in. Unsurprisingly then, some Internet users have become convinced that we're in some sort of parallel universe. How would we find ourselves in this bizarre universe? Well, Twitter user Nick Hinton is convinced that the world ended in 2012, and his ideas seem to have found some backers.

    Back in July, Hinton started a Twitter thread titled "a conspiracy thread: Did the World End in 2012?" It's since gone on to acquire thousands of replies and retweets from fellow social media users who seem to believe in his ideas.

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    The thread starts: "I’ve wanted to talk about this subject for a while now. The other day I had a random urge to look into it again and read some old stuff. You know, just for ‘fun’. Ever since then, I’ve noticed other people talking about it again."

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    Hinton started by explaining that he's known of a few people who think similarly to him, but hasn't been able to find any mention of it online.

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    Hinton believes that the world ended in 2012, when scientists found the Higgs Boson.

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    Why does he believe this? Because nothing has felt the same since.

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    Hinton believes that the Higgs Boson destroyed the universe and shifted our consciousness to another universe.

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    His reasoning? Some people seem to remember things slightly differently from others.

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    Some people remember the Statue of Liberty being on Ellis Islands, while it's actually on Liberty Island.

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    Creepy. SOURCE: TWITTER

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    Some people also seem to remember climbing the torch of the Statue of Liberty, when it's actually been closed to the public since World War I.

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    There's even some photos believed to be taken from inside the torch.

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    It gets even weirder.

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    There are even users who claim to be scientists from CERN who back up the theory.

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    These kind of theories have been around for a while.

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    We could also be on the back of a turtle?

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    Science. SOURCE: TWITTER

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    It gets better. The government can't time travel past 2012.

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    It's even made its way into pop culture.

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    "The ‘end of history’ is a philosophical idea that has been talked about by such notable figures as Hegel, Marx, and most recently Francis Fukuyama," Hinton writes.

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    He concludes: "If you think fourth dimensionally, or beyond linear time, we could say that the universe has already ended. The moment it began, the end was set in stone."

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    We're convinced. SOURCE: TWITTER

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    The thread received plenty of replies, and some people seem convinced. "I don’t even know what i don’t know anymore," one user wrote.

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    Others are less easily convinced, with one user writing:

    "I hope people don’t believe this lol time seems to move faster due to the advancement of technology. The amount of information that would take days or even weeks to reach the user back then is now available at our fingertips in seconds."

    SOURCE: TWITTER

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    Another user joked: "Your FBI man just got fired for letting you post this."

    SOURCE: TWITTER

    Source : megaphone.upworthy.com

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