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    some people marry for money but you should marry for love song

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    'Yes, marry for money': A Harvard

    Harvard economist Laurence Kotlikoff shares the money benefits of marrying your long-term partner — and how to make sure you don't fall victim to an expensive divorce settlement.

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    MONEY

    ‘Yes, marry for money’: A top economist shares the surprising financial benefits of marriage

    Published Fri, Feb 11 20222:06 PM ESTUpdated Sat, Feb 12 202210:12 AM EST

    Laurence J. Kotlikoff, Contributor

    @KOTLIKOFF SHARE

    Peter Dazeley | Getty Images

    Valentine’s Day is almost here, and marriage is all the rage. According to the Wedding Report, there will be some 2.5 million weddings this year — the most since 1984.

    As an economist, I’m all for it: Marriage beats partnering long-term. I’m no expert on how to meet the love of your life; my goal is to make sure that you barter for a spouse or partner understanding the economic resources and financial obligations that you each bring to the table.

    Yes, bartering for love sounds heartless, but it’s on full display on America’s 1,500 dating apps and websites.

    Marrying for money isn’t a bad thing

    I’m not claiming that money is the only deciding factor in pairing up. For most of us, love transcends money.

    But we humans have the capacity to fall in love with lots of people. And there’s no shame in targeting your swooning on someone who can provide you with a higher standard of living.

    Put it this way: If two people are the same in most respects, except one earns twice as much as the other, don’t flip a coin. Go for the higher earner, and yes, marry for money. You won’t be the first to play the oldest financial trick in the book.

    Choosing to marry over partnering long-term may mean somewhat higher net taxes, but it comes with an array of valuable implicit insurance arrangements, which the formality and legality of marriage help enforce.

    Marriage can mean important Social Security benefits

    On top of short-term financial benefits of marrying, like the implicit joining of resources, there are long-term benefits, as well.

    First, after just nine months, you’re eligible to collect future widow(er) Social Security benefits. Plus, after one year of marriage, you and your spouse are eligible to collect future spousal benefits. And if you stay married for 10 years, you’re eligible for divorced spousal and divorced widow(er) benefits.

    But, to be clear, with the way Social Security’s benefits formulas work, the spousal benefit will be useful only to spouses who earn very little in absolute terms and also earn a lot less than their marital partner.

    The widow(er) benefit, on the other hand, can be of tremendous value to the lower-earning spouse (or divorced person), provided the higher-earning spouse (or ex-spouse) dies first.

    Get married, but always assume you’ll get divorced

    Marriage can also benefit your long-term standard of living, albeit to a highly imperfect and uncertain extent, if you’re awarded alimony in divorce.

    An estimated 41% of all first marriages will end in divorce or separation, according to data from California-based law firm Wilkinson & Finkbeiner. Some 60% of second marriages go south, while 73% of third marriages will start with “forever” and end with “sayonara.”

    Yet, we all marry convinced we’ll make it. Economists call this phenomenon “irrational expectations” — when people collectively believe in something they know is collectively false.

    But wishful thinking about marriage comes at an awful price. Many marriages end in exorbitantly costly divorce war, with children forced to take sides and family ties shredded forever.

    Maybe it’s time to reset our idea of marriage from a lifetime partnership to a temporary arrangement that should be celebrated for lasting as long as it does, not lamented for coming apart.

    Put a prenup on it

    Take the case of hypothetical Sally, who wants her spouse-to-be, Sam, to stay home with the kids while she pursues her lifetime dream of being a contractor. Sally is a go-getter. Her plan is to borrow $1 million, construct and sell a dream house, and use it to showcase her talents.

    The problem, from Sam’s perspective, is that fulfilling Sally’s dream means giving up his career. Plus, if they split and the house sells for $500,000, Sam will get stuck with $250,000 in “their” debt.

    Moreover, Sally wants to live in Texas, which is far less generous in providing alimony than, say, Massachusetts. So, if Sally’s career takes off, but she takes off with the tile subcontractor, Sam will reap precious little from his investment.

    If Sally and Sam marry without resolving this potential conflict, Sam may get cold feet and file for divorce before he co-signs the construction loan. But what if they sign a prenup that assigns, upon divorce, all construction debts to Sally, but provides Sam half the profits if Sally’s company succeeds for, say, 20 years?

    This lets Sally take her shot while protecting Sam.

    Despite the clear benefit of prenups, not signing one is a huge mistake that many people make. Whatever financial concerns would be addressed in a prenup will inevitably arise once you get married.

    It’s far better to negotiate in advance how things will be settled than have one party feel they have, in getting married, lost bargaining power in making financial decisions that could damage them in the context of divorce.

    Source : www.cnbc.com

    Trace Adkins – Marry for Money Lyrics

    Marry for Money Lyrics: She was pretty, she was smart / She was witty, yeah, she had charm / Cupid shot me, that's what got me down the aisle / But that match made in heaven went straight to hell / Split

    Marry for Money Trace Adkins Track 7 on X (Ten)

    After a first marriage that ended badly, the protagonist says he’s learned his lesson. Next time he’ll marry for the right reason: $MOREMONEY.00 It’s tongue-in-cheek of… Read More

    Produced by Frank Rogers Release Date November 25, 2008 View All Credits 1

    Marry for Money Lyrics

    [Verse 1]

    She was pretty, she was smart

    She was witty, yeah, she had charm

    Cupid shot me, that's what got me down the aisle

    But that match made in heaven went straight to hell

    Split up our possessions, put the house up for sale

    And I learned a lesson I won't be forgetting

    The next time around

    [Chorus]

    I'm gonna marry for money

    I'll be so damn rich, it ain't funny

    I'm gonna have me a trust fund

    Yacht club, hot tub, piece of the pie

    Find me a sweet sugar mama

    With a whole lot of zeros and commas

    Don't really care if she loves me

    She can even be ugly

    I'm gonna marry for money

    Giveon 'Lie Again' Official Lyrics & Meaning | Verified

    [Verse 2]

    I won't have to love her family

    I won't have to like her friends

    And if it works out like I planned it

    I won't ever have to work again

    [Chorus]

    I'm gonna marry for money

    I'll be so damn rich, it ain't funny

    I'm gonna have me a trust fund

    Yacht club, hot tub, piece of the pie

    Find me a sweet sugar mama

    With a whole lot of zeros and commas

    I don't care if she loves me

    She can even be ugly

    I'm gonna marry for money

    [Post-Chorus] Show me the money Cha-ching [Chorus]

    Y'all, I'm gonna fly to Hawaii

    On a Learjet the old lady buys me

    I'll call her sweetheart and honey

    If she's a hundred and twenty

    I'm gonna marry for money

    I don't care if she loves me

    She can be really ugly

    I'm gonna marry for money

    [Post-Chorus] Oh, cha-ching Mucho dinero [Outro]

    Come on over here, you good looking thing you

    There's your walker in the corner

    Over there, over there

    About

    Genius Annotation

    After a first marriage that ended badly, the protagonist says he’s learned his lesson. Next time he’ll marry for the right reason: $MOREMONEY.00

    It’s tongue-in-cheek of course, but it’s good country music and Adkins' performance is perfect for the song.

    If this song brings a smile, go next to listen to and read Ry Cooder’s “Money Honey”.

    Ask us a question about this song

    No questions asked yet

    X (Ten) (2008) Trace Adkins 1. Sweet 2. Happy To Be Here 3.

    All I Ask For Anymore

    4. Let’s Do That Again 5. Hauling One Thing 6.

    Better Than I Thought It’d Be

    7. Marry for Money 8.

    Til The Last Shot’s Fired

    9. I Can’t Outrun You 10. Hillbilly Rich 11.

    Sometimes A Man Takes A Drink

    12. Muddy Water 13. In Color Credits Produced By Frank Rogers Written By

    Dave Turnbull & Jimmy Melton

    Release Date November 25, 2008 Tags Country Satire Comments Add a comment jozef1966 Contributor 3 years ago Funny as heck!!!

    Sign Up And Drop Knowledge 🤓

    Genius is the ultimate source of music knowledge, created by scholars like you who share facts and insight about the songs and artists they love.

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    Should we marry for love or for money?

    Answer (1 of 103): If you're happy with money, marry for money by all means. It only means there's a good chance you'll have to keep up the illusion of loving someone, and putting a dent in your self-respect for the rest of your life. Then again, if you marry on an empty stomach, you'll suffer f...

    Should we marry for love or for money?

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    103 Answers Rahul Ganguly

    , Understands the value of earning and spending.

    Answered 7 years ago · Author has 411 answers and 916K answer views

    If you're happy with money, marry for money by all means. It only means there's a good chance you'll have to keep up the illusion of loving someone, and putting a dent in your self-respect for the rest of your life.

    Then again, if you marry on an empty stomach, you'll suffer from malnutrition.

    The best thing is building a career for yourself and gaining financial freedom and self-respect. Marriage then will become incidental, and then you'll be able to actually afford marrying for love.

    Related questions

    You have two choices. A man whom you love and is very rich, another man whom you love even more but is poor. Who would you choose and why?

    Which is more important, marrying for money or love?

    Which would you prefer to marry, a rich guy but you are not in love with him or a poor guy to whom you really loved but no financially assurance?

    If given just the two choices, would you marry for money or for love?

    Why do some people marry for money, status, success, and not for love?

    David (son of) Elohym

    , former Currently Retired Teacher at Compton Unified School District (1994-2002)

    Answered 1 year ago · Author has 8.6K answers and 3M answer views

    Originally Answered: Should you marry for money or love?

    As a man, my advice for men is to NOT get married. Love is in the mind and doesn’t last. Sex usually stops after a year or two. Money is constantly drained from you and usually you never have enough.

    Women should marry for money because love is a mirage that disappears when you get to the oasis.

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    Glenn Rocess

    , Happily married for 24 years and going strong!

    Answered 5 years ago · Author has 1.8K answers and 11.7M answer views

    When I first went out on a date with her, I had $60 and a car. We fell in love and we're more in love today than when we first married 24 years ago.

    “True love” sounds corny as hell….but it's real, the realist thing I know, and there is no amount of money that could tear me away from her.

    If you are wise, you'll marry for love, because when the years grow long and the days grow short and cold, money might warm your skin, but it can't warm your heart or your soul.

    Marry for love and only for love. I don't want you to find out the hard way what happens when you marry for money.

    Alvika Jaju

    , I believe in love stories! :D

    Answered 6 years ago · Author has 805 answers and 3.1M answer views

    What would I (you) do with a house but with having no one at home what reason would make me come home from work?

    Why would I do dining at a 7 star if I can't share what I feel with the person dining with me?

    Why would I dress up with Gucci and Armani if I can't dress up a smile or share laughter which comes from the heart only with loved ones.

    I will choose to be with my loved ones even if it means staying under a shack, humble meal and simple clothes. I'd suggest you to too. :)

    Even Master card says..."there are some things money can't buy" :P

    Marry the person you love and you'll find all the happ

    Related questions

    Should you marry for love or money if you have to choose? Does money make marriage easier?

    How should I cope with the tough choice between marrying a poor man I love, or an affluent and clever man I am ok with?

    Is it better to marry someone rich for security or marry someone poor for love?

    There are two guys who love me. One is poor and the other one is rich. The poor guy tries to make me smile and happy all the time with little efforts he makes. The rich one also loves me as equally but doesn't show much. Which is perfect for me?

    Is it better to marry for money and hope to fall in love, or to marry for love and hope for money?

    Julie Gurner , Married.

    Answered 6 years ago · Author has 3.7K answers and 44.2M answer views

    Originally Answered: Do you marry for love or for money?

    You marry for love, with someone who has a good sense about money.

    It isn't about how much your potential spouse has, but how they interact with it. Do they overspend? Have a ton of debt because of stupid things? (not medical issues, but going to sports games for ex), do they expect that you will support them financially for life?

    While it's true you should marry for love, your spouse will be the single biggest financial decision you will make.

    You will be joining together legally - their future debts will be yours too, and if you divorce they can have a significant impact on your quality o

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    Michael Baker

    , Happily married 24 years

    Answered 1 year ago · Author has 126 answers and 17.7K answer views

    Source : www.quora.com

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