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    Sirius is the dominant star in what constellation? (Bing Quiz)

    Microsoft Rewards Bing Homepage Quiz Question: Sirius is the dominant star in what constellation? The given options are: Ursa MajorOrionCanis Major

    MS Bing Quizzes

    Sirius is the dominant star in what constellation? (Bing Quiz)

    ByTUTA_blogger July 2, 2022July 2, 2022

    [7-3-2022] Microsoft Rewards Bing Homepage Quiz Question: Sirius is the dominant star in what constellation?

    The given options are:

    Ursa Major Orion Canis Major

    Correct Answer: Canis Major

    Info: Canis Major is a constellation in the southern celestial hemisphere. It was included in Ptolemy’s 48 constellations in the second century and is counted among the 88 modern constellations. Sirius is in the constellation Canis Major (Greater Dog). In Greek mythology, Canis Major is one of the constellation Orion’s hunting dogs in pursuit of the hare, seen as the constellation Lepus. The Milky Way passes through Canis Major, and several open clusters lie within its borders, most notably M41.

    Today’s “Microsoft Rewards Bing Homepage Quiz” has three questions related to Sirius. Each question has only one correct answer and carries one point. The wrong answer does not earn any points. So, select only the correct answers.

    All three questions from today’s Bing Homepage Quiz are below. You can find their answers by visiting those pages.

    They’re in the dog family, but their babies are called kits, not pups. What are they?

    What is the origin of the phrase ‘dog days of summer’?

    Sirius is the dominant star in what constellation?

    Source : www.tellustheanswer.com

    Sirius

    Sirius, also called Alpha Canis Majoris or the Dog Star, brightest star in the night sky, with apparent visual magnitude −1.46. It is a binary star in the constellation Canis Major. The bright component of the binary is a blue-white star 25.4 times as luminous as the Sun. It has a radius 1.71 times that of the Sun and a surface temperature of 9,940 kelvins (K), which is more than 4,000 K higher than that of the Sun. Its distance from the solar system is 8.6 light-years, only twice the distance of the nearest known star system beyond the Sun,

    Sirius

    star

    Alternate titles: Alpha Canis Majoris, Dog Star, Sirius A, Sothis

    By The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica • Edit History

    Sirius, also called Alpha Canis Majoris or the Dog Star, brightest star in the night sky, with apparent visual magnitude −1.46. It is a binary star in the constellation Canis Major. The bright component of the binary is a blue-white star 25.4 times as luminous as the Sun. It has a radius 1.71 times that of the Sun and a surface temperature of 9,940 kelvins (K), which is more than 4,000 K higher than that of the Sun. Its distance from the solar system is 8.6 light-years, only twice the distance of the nearest known star system beyond the Sun, the Alpha Centauri system. Its name comes from a Greek word meaning “sparkling” or “scorching.”

    Sirius

    Sirius A and B (lower left) photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

    NASA, ESA, H. Bond (STScI), and M. Barstow (University of Leicester)

    Sirius was known as Sothis to the ancient Egyptians, who were aware that it made its first heliacal rising (i.e., rose just before sunrise) of the year at about the time the annual floods were beginning in the Nile River delta. They long believed that Sothis caused the Nile floods, and they discovered that the heliacal rising of the star occurred at intervals of 365.25 days rather than the 365 days of their calendar year, a correction in the length of the year that was later incorporated in the Julian calendar. Among the ancient Romans, the hottest part of the year was associated with the heliacal rising of the Dog Star, a connection that survives in the expression “dog days.”

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    That Sirius is a binary star was first reported by the German astronomer Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel in 1844. He had observed that the bright star was pursuing a slightly wavy course among its neighbours in the sky and concluded that it had a companion star, with which it revolved in a period of about 50 years. The companion was first seen in 1862 by Alvan Clark, an American astronomer and telescope maker.

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    Sirius and its companion revolve together in orbits of considerable eccentricity and with average separation of the stars of about 20 times Earth’s distance from the Sun. Despite the glare of the bright star, the eighth-magnitude companion is readily seen with a large telescope. This companion star, Sirius B, is about as massive as the Sun, though much more condensed, and was the first white dwarf star to be discovered.

    This article was most recently revised and updated by Erik Gregersen.

    Source : www.britannica.com

    Sirius

    Sirius

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    Several terms redirect here. For other uses, see Sirius (disambiguation), Sirius B (disambiguation) and Dog Star (disambiguation).

    Sirius

    The position of Sirius (circled)

    Observation data

    Epoch J2000.0      Equinox ICRS

    Constellation Canis Major

    Pronunciation /ˈsɪriəs/[1]

    SiriusRight ascension 06h 45m 08.91728s[2]Declination −16° 42′ 58.0171″[2]Apparent magnitude (V) −1.46[3]ARight ascension 06h 45m 08.917s[4]Declination −16° 42′ 58.02″[4]Apparent magnitude (V) −1.47[5]BRight ascension 06h 45m 09.0s[6]Declination −16° 43′ 06″[6]Apparent magnitude (V) 8.44[5]

    Characteristics Sirius A

    Evolutionary stage Main sequence

    Spectral type A0mA1 Va[7]

    U−B colour index −0.05[3]

    B−V colour index +0.00[3]

    Sirius B

    Evolutionary stage White dwarf

    Spectral type DA2[5]

    U−B colour index −1.04[8]

    B−V colour index −0.03[8]

    Astrometry

    Radial velocity (Rv) −5.50[9] km/sProper motion (μ) RA: −546.01 mas/yr[2]

    Dec.: −1,223.07 mas/yr[2]

    Parallax (π) 374.4896 ± 0.2313 mas[10]Distance 8.709 ± 0.005 ly

    (2.670 ± 0.002 pc) Sirius A

    Absolute magnitude (MV) +1.42[11]

    Sirius B

    Absolute magnitude (MV) +11.18[8]

    Orbit[12]

    Primary α Canis Majoris ACompanion α Canis Majoris BPeriod (P) 50.1284 ± 0.0043 yrSemi-major axis (a) 7.4957 ± 0.0025″Eccentricity (e) 0.59142 ± 0.00037Inclination (i) 136.336 ± 0.040°Longitude of the node (Ω) 45.400 ± 0.071°Periastron epoch (T) 1,994.5715 ± 0.0058Argument of periastron (ω)

    (secondary) 149.161 ± 0.075°

    Details Sirius A

    Mass 2.063 ± 0.023[12] M☉Radius 1.711[13] R☉Luminosity 25.4[13] L☉Surface gravity (log ) 4.33[14] cgsTemperature 9,940[14] KMetallicity [Fe/H] 0.50[15] dexRotational velocity ( sin ) 16[16] km/sAge 242 ± 5[12] Myr

    Sirius B

    Mass 1.018 ± 0.011[12] M☉Radius 0.0084 ± 3%[17] R☉Luminosity 0.056[18] L☉Surface gravity (log ) 8.57[17] cgsTemperature 25,000 ± 200[13] KAge 228+10

    −8[12] Myr Other designations

    Dog Star, Aschere, Canicula, Al Shira, Sothis,[19] Alhabor,[20] Mrgavyadha, Lubdhaka,[21] Tenrōsei,[22] α Canis Majoris (α CMa), 9 Canis Majoris (9 CMa), HD 48915, HR 2491, BD−16°1591, GJ 244, LHS 219, ADS 5423, LTT 2638, HIP 32349[23]

    Sirius B: EGGR 49, WD 0642-166, GCTP 1577.00[24]

    Database references

    SIMBAD The system

    A B

    Sirius is the brightest star in the night sky. Its name is derived from the Greek word Σείριος, or , meaning lit. 'glowing' or 'scorching'. The star is designated α Canis Majoris, Latinized to Alpha Canis Majoris, and abbreviated Alpha CMa or α CMa. With a visual apparent magnitude of −1.46, Sirius is almost twice as bright as Canopus, the next brightest star. Sirius is a binary star consisting of a main-sequence star of spectral type A0 or A1, termed Sirius A, and a faint white dwarf companion of spectral type DA2, termed Sirius B. The distance between the two varies between 8.2 and 31.5 astronomical units as they orbit every 50 years.[25]

    Sirius appears bright because of its intrinsic luminosity and its proximity to the Solar System. At a distance of 2.64 parsecs (8.6 ly), the Sirius system is one of Earth's nearest neighbours. Sirius is gradually moving closer to the Solar System, so it is expected to increase in brightness slightly over the next 60,000 years, reaching a peak magnitude of -1.68. After that time, its distance will begin to increase, and it will become fainter, but it will continue to be the brightest star in the Earth's night sky for approximately the next 210,000 years, before Vega, another A-type star more luminous than Sirius becomes the brightest star.[26]

    Sirius A is about twice as massive as the Sun (M☉) and has an absolute visual magnitude of +1.42. It is 25 times as luminous as the Sun,[13] but has a significantly lower luminosity than other bright stars such as Canopus or Rigel. The system is between 200 and 300 million years old.[13] It was originally composed of two bright bluish stars. The more massive of these, Sirius B, consumed its hydrogen fuel and became a red giant before shedding its outer layers and collapsing into its current state as a white dwarf around 120 million years ago.[13]

    Sirius is known colloquially as the "Dog Star", reflecting its prominence in its constellation, Canis Major (the Greater Dog).[19] The heliacal rising of Sirius marked the flooding of the Nile in Ancient Egypt and the "dog days" of summer for the ancient Greeks, while to the Polynesians, mostly in the Southern Hemisphere, the star marked winter and was an important reference for their navigation around the Pacific Ocean.

    Contents

    1 Observational history

    1.1 Kinematics 1.2 Distance

    1.3 Discovery of Sirius B

    1.4 Colour controversy

    1.5 Distant star cluster

    2 Observation 3 Stellar system 3.1 Sirius A 3.2 Sirius B

    3.3 Apparent third star

    3.4 Star cluster membership

    4 Etymology and cultural significance

    4.1 Dogon 4.2 Serer religion

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

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