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    review friar laurence’s soliloquy in act ii, scene iii of romeo and juliet. which statements about friar laurence’s soliloquy are true? check all that apply. friar laurence provides advice for cooking with herbs. friar laurence contrasts the good and bad uses of herbs. friar laurence warns romeo against eating certain herbs. friar laurence explains to the audience his use for herbs. friar laurence describes to the audience his role as friar.

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get review friar laurence’s soliloquy in act ii, scene iii of romeo and juliet. which statements about friar laurence’s soliloquy are true? check all that apply. friar laurence provides advice for cooking with herbs. friar laurence contrasts the good and bad uses of herbs. friar laurence warns romeo against eating certain herbs. friar laurence explains to the audience his use for herbs. friar laurence describes to the audience his role as friar. from EN Bilgi.

    Which statements about Friar Laurence’s soliloquy are true?

    Which statements about Friar Laurence’s soliloquy are true? Check all that apply.

    English

    Which statements about Friar Laurence’s soliloquy are true?

    Which statements about Friar Laurence’s soliloquy are true? Check all that apply.

    Answers

    Answer is in the photo. I couldn't attach it here, but uploaded it to a file hosting. link below! Good Luck!

    cutt.ly/4zZs6GM answer:

    i dont know ...sorry...

    Explanation:

    Second Option: Friar Laurence contrasts the good and bad uses of herbs.

    Fourth Option: Friar Laurence explains to the audience his use for herbs.

    Explanation:

    "Romeo and Juliet" is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616).

    Friar Laurence's Soliloquy takes place in scene iii of act ii. Romeo after meeting Juliet in later parts of the night visits friar early in the morning. Before Romeo reaches there Friar Laurence is busy collecting some medicinal and poisonous herbs. He is also talking to himself (soliloquy). Soliloquy ends when Romeo reaches, bids Friar good morning and asks for his help in marrying Juliet.

    In the soliloquy, Friar first mentions weeds which may either be medicinal or poisonous depending on their use. Some medicines smell very nice, but may be poisonous when eaten. The same flower may be good if used one way, and poisonous if used in another way. Friar Laurence is actually foreshadowing the impacts and Romeo and Juliet's love, which may prove deadly for them, but will bring peace to the families who have been fighting seemingly for ever.

    Friar Laurence does not directly mention that he will use these herbs, however there are some references to this fact e.g.

    "I must upfill this osier cage of ours

    With baleful weeds and precious-juicèd flowers"

    However he directly mentions good and bad uses of herbs in lines,

    "For naught so vile that on the earth doth live

    But to the earth some special good doth give.

    Nor aught so good but, strained from that fair use

    Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse.

    Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied,

    And vice sometime by action dignified."

    First and fifth options are not correct because there is no mention of cooking the herbs, or his role as friar.

    Third option is incorrect because it is a soliloquy, and it occurs before Romeo reaches there.

    The answer is B. Explanation: Your welcome. 🙂

    The statements about Friar Laurence’s soliloquy which are true are:

    Friar Laurence provides advice for cooking with herbs.

    Friar Laurence explains to the audience his use for herbs.

    Friar Laurence describes to the audience his role as friar.

    Friar Laurence’s speech in Act II Scene 2 of the play “ Romeo and Juliet” is about the coexistence of good and evil. He takes the reference of the herbs and plants who possess medicinal properties. He says that if these plants are used in an apt quantity, then they are capable of curing the disease but if they are misused, they can harm and can be poisonous. He gives this speech to Romeo who tells him about his love for Juliet.

    The statements about Friar Laurence’s soliloquy which are true are:

    Friar Laurence describes to the audience his role as friar.

    Friar Laurence explains to the audience his use for herbs.

    Friar Laurence provides advice for cooking with herbs.

    Explanation:

    Friar Lawrence's speech in Act II Scene 2 of the tragic drama "Romeo and Juliet" talks about the duality of good and evil while making reference to herns and their medicinal properties, he also added that if the plants are used in the right way, they would cure the disease but if abused, it could be harmful. He says all these to a love-struck Romeo after he confesses his love for Juliet.

    Friar Laurence provides advice for cooking with herbs.

    Friar Laurence explains to the audience his use for herbs.

    Friar Laurence describes to the audience his role as friar.

    Hope this helps(:

    He basically talks about the good things he can do with the herbs so I’d say the correct answer is 1

    arachcek all that apply

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    Soliloquy and Figures of Speech in Romeo and Juliet, Part 4 Eng 2 answer keys Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like Read the dialogue found in Act II, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet. Romeo: Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you? Mercutio: The slip, sir, the slip; can you not conceive? Romeo: Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great; and in such a case as mine a man may strain courtesy. Mercutio: That's as much as to say, such a case as yours constrains a man to bow in the hams. Romeo: Meaning—to curtsy. Mercutio: Thou hast most kindly hit it. Romeo: A most courteous exposition. Mercutio: Nay, I am the very pink of courtesy. How does the wordplay in these lines affect the mood?, Read the lines from Act II, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet. Mercutio: Where the devil should this Romeo be? Came he not home to-night? Benvolio: Not to his father's; I spoke with his man. Mercutio: Why that same pale hard-hearted wench, that Rosaline, Torments him so, that he will sure run mad. Benvolio: Tybalt, the kinsman of old Capulet, Hath sent a letter to his father's house. Which plot detail adds to the suspenseful mood?, Read the exchange between Romeo and Nurse in Act II, scene iv of Romeo and Juliet. Romeo: Bid her devise Some means to come to shrift this afternoon; And there she shall at Friar Laurence' cell, Be shriv'd and married. Here is for thy pains. Nurse: No, truly, sir; not a penny. Romeo: Go to; I say, you shall. Nurse: This afternoon, sir? well, she shall be there. Which plot detail adds to the mood of anticipation? Which plot detail adds to the mood of anticipation? and more.

    Soliloquy and Figures of Speech in Romeo and Juliet, Part 4 Eng 2 answer keys

    2.7 46 Reviews

    Read the dialogue found in Act II, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

    Romeo: Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you?

    Mercutio: The slip, sir, the slip; can you not conceive?

    Romeo: Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great; and in such a case as mine a man may strain courtesy.

    Mercutio: That's as much as to say, such a case as yours constrains a man to bow in the hams.

    Romeo: Meaning—to curtsy.

    Mercutio: Thou hast most kindly hit it.

    Romeo: A most courteous exposition.

    Mercutio: Nay, I am the very pink of courtesy.

    How does the wordplay in these lines affect the mood?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    It creates a mischievous mood as Mercutio and Romeo banter about Romeo's disappearance.

    Click again to see term 👆

    Read the lines from Act II, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

    Mercutio: Where the devil should this Romeo be?

    Came he not home to-night?

    Benvolio: Not to his father's; I spoke with his man.

    Mercutio: Why that same pale hard-hearted wench, that Rosaline,

    Torments him so, that he will sure run mad.

    Benvolio: Tybalt, the kinsman of old Capulet,

    Hath sent a letter to his father's house.

    Which plot detail adds to the suspenseful mood?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    Rosaline is the source of Romeo's pain.

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/15 Created by aa3071245

    Terms in this set (15)

    Read the dialogue found in Act II, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

    Romeo: Good morrow to you both. What counterfeit did I give you?

    Mercutio: The slip, sir, the slip; can you not conceive?

    Romeo: Pardon, good Mercutio, my business was great; and in such a case as mine a man may strain courtesy.

    Mercutio: That's as much as to say, such a case as yours constrains a man to bow in the hams.

    Romeo: Meaning—to curtsy.

    Mercutio: Thou hast most kindly hit it.

    Romeo: A most courteous exposition.

    Mercutio: Nay, I am the very pink of courtesy.

    How does the wordplay in these lines affect the mood?

    It creates a mischievous mood as Mercutio and Romeo banter about Romeo's disappearance.

    Read the lines from Act II, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

    Mercutio: Where the devil should this Romeo be?

    Came he not home to-night?

    Benvolio: Not to his father's; I spoke with his man.

    Mercutio: Why that same pale hard-hearted wench, that Rosaline,

    Torments him so, that he will sure run mad.

    Benvolio: Tybalt, the kinsman of old Capulet,

    Hath sent a letter to his father's house.

    Which plot detail adds to the suspenseful mood?

    Rosaline is the source of Romeo's pain.

    Read the exchange between Romeo and Nurse in Act II, scene iv of Romeo and Juliet.

    Romeo: Bid her devise

    Some means to come to shrift this afternoon;

    And there she shall at Friar Laurence' cell,

    Be shriv'd and married. Here is for thy pains.

    Nurse: No, truly, sir; not a penny.

    Romeo: Go to; I say, you shall.

    Nurse: This afternoon, sir? well, she shall be there.

    Which plot detail adds to the mood of anticipation?

    Which plot detail adds to the mood of anticipation?

    Nurse refuses to take money from Romeo.

    Read the lines from Act II, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

    Romeo: Thou wast never with me for anything when thou wast not here for the goose.

    Mercutio: I will bite thee by the ear for that jest.

    Romeo: Nay, good goose, bite not.

    How does the wordplay in these lines affect the mood?

    The play on words creates a light-hearted mood as Romeo teasingly compares Mercutio to a goose.

    Mood is the ________created by a text.

    emotion

    Shakespeare includes speeches by both Romeo and Juliet in Act II, Scene ii to

    show Romeo's and Juliet's true feelings about one another.

    Which are examples of puns? Check all that apply.

    The poor, old cow was udderly exhausted.

    That lightning storm was just shocking.

    Puns were used by Shakespeare to

    add humor or hidden meanings to a scene.

    Review Friar Laurence's soliloquy in Act II, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

    Which statements about Friar Laurence's soliloquy are true? Check all that apply.

    Friar Laurence provides advice for cooking with herbs.

    Friar Laurence explains to the audience his use for herbs.

    Friar Laurence describes to the audience his role as friar.

    Read the lines from Act II, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

    Mercutio: Well said; follow me this jest now till thou hast worn out the pump, that, when the single sole of it is worn, the jest may remain after the wearing sole singular.

    Romeo: O single-soled jest! solely singular for the singleness.

    Which word is used as a pun in these lines?

    sole

    A soliloquy is used in drama to

    allow the audience direct access to a character's feelings.

    Which lines best set a romantic mood in Act II, scene ii of Romeo and Juliet?

    But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks?

    It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!

    Read Romeo's soliloquy from Act II, scene ii of Romeo and Juliet.

    But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks?

    It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!

    Source : quizlet.com

    Friar Laurence in Romeo and Juliet: Soliloquy & Letter to Romeo

    Friar Laurence is a pivotal character in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet as he is the one to marry the doomed young lovers in secret. Explore Friar...

    English Courses / Course / Chapter

    Friar Laurence in Romeo and Juliet: Soliloquy & Letter to Romeo

    Instructor: Ann Casano

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    Friar Laurence is a pivotal character in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet as he is the one to marry the doomed young lovers in secret. Explore Friar Laurence's character, his foreshadowing soliloquy about the medicinal benefits of plants and herbs, and his fateful, undelivered letter to Romeo. Updated: 09/07/2021

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    Who Is Friar Laurence?

    A Love Not Meant to Be

    is one of William Shakespeare's most famous tragedies. However, if it wasn't for the subject of this lesson, it could have had a happy ending. Friar Laurence is Romeo's mentor and confidante. But the thing about the Friar is that he's not always looking out for the best interests of young Romeo.

    His soliloquy in Act 2, Scene 3 marks his introduction in the play. Every character in serves a distinct purpose in moving the narrative forward. Because Romeo trusts the Friar, he tells him of his love for Juliet, even though she is a Capulet, and he is a Montague. For reasons unknown, the two rival families of Verona are involved in an epic and sometimes violent family feud.

    On the night Romeo meets Juliet, he races from her balcony to Friar Laurence to tell him that he wants to marry Juliet immediately. But the Friar doesn't believe that two people so young who barely know each other should be getting married. He even reminds Romeo that he was just in love with Rosaline a mere few days ago.

    However, the Friar wishes for nothing more than the rivalry between the two prestigious families of Verona to end. He believes that if a Capulet and a Montague get married, then the bitter feud will finally be set aside. The Friar is foremost trying to make peace. He is doing what he thinks is the right thing by marrying Romeo and Juliet.

    Quiz Course 58K views

    Friar Laurence tries to help Romeo and Juliet

    Friar Laurence's Soliloquy

    In Act 2, Scene 3, right before Romeo enters, we find the Friar out and about in the early morning looking for herbs and medicinal plants. Because many of the poor people during this time could not afford doctors, clergymen were known to help out with a holistic-style treatment if called upon.

    Friar Laurence collects medicinal herbs

    The Friar's soliloquy is about the healing power of plants and herbs. However, he also warns that some plants used to heal can also be poisonous. This, of course, foreshadows the tragic events to come by indicating what will happen later on in the play.

    If we can pull one distinct theme from the rhyming soliloquy, it would be that there is both good and bad things in people and in nature. It all depends on how something is used.

    The soliloquy begins:

    'Now, ere the sun advance his burning eye,

    The day to cheer and night's dank dew to dry,

    I must up-fill this osier cage of ours

    With baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers.

    The earth that's nature's mother is her tomb.

    What is her burying grave that is her womb;'

    We can translate these very important last two foreshadowing lines to mean the earth is where things are both born and buried. Romeo and Juliet will soon be dead, but the Montague/Capulet rivalry will end, which will give birth to peace among the families.

    Here's the rest of the soliloquy:

    'And from her womb children of divers kind

    We sucking on her natural bosom find,

    Many for many virtues excellent,

    None but for some and yet all different.

    O, mickle is the powerful grace that lies

    In plants, herbs, stones, and their true qualities:

    For naught so vile that on the earth doth live

    But to the earth some special good doth give;

    Nor aught so good but, strain'd from that fair use,

    Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse.'

    Okay, there are a few important themes and ideas to take away from the Friar's soliloquy. The earth grows many different useful things. All of Earth's creatures have a lot of good qualities and uses, despite the fact that every creature is different and some of the creatures may be ugly. But if Earth's creatures are used inappropriately, then the outcomes could be dangerous. Something like a plant can be used for both poison and medicine.

    The Friar is also saying that plants are a lot like humans. Just as a plant can be both good and bad, each individual human has that dichotomy in them as well. Death is not only a part of life, but death is necessary for life. Therefore, we can even view death as being positive because it breeds life.

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    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 14 day ago
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    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

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