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    read this excerpt from chapter 1 of the scarlet letter. certain it is, that, some fifteen or twenty years after the settlement of the town, the wooden jail was already marked with weather-stains and other indications of age, which gave a yet darker aspect to its beetle-browed and gloomy front. the rust on the ponderous iron-work of its oaken door looked more antique than any thing else in the new world. the author most likely include the words “darker aspect,” “beetle-browed,” “gloomy,” and “ponderous” in order to

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get read this excerpt from chapter 1 of the scarlet letter. certain it is, that, some fifteen or twenty years after the settlement of the town, the wooden jail was already marked with weather-stains and other indications of age, which gave a yet darker aspect to its beetle-browed and gloomy front. the rust on the ponderous iron-work of its oaken door looked more antique than any thing else in the new world. the author most likely include the words “darker aspect,” “beetle-browed,” “gloomy,” and “ponderous” in order to from EN Bilgi.

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    The Scarlet Letter

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    Lastly, in lieu of these shifting scenes, came back the rude market-place of the Puritan settlement, with all the townspeople assembled and levelling their stern regards at Hester Prynne,—yes, at herself,—who stood on the scaffold of the pillory, an infant on her arm, and the letter A, in scarlet, fantastically embroidered with gold thread, upon her bosom!

    What is the effect of the underlined words in this excerpt?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    They impart a mood of distress and shame.

    Click again to see term 👆

    Finding it so directly on the threshold of our narrative, which is now about to issue from that inauspicious portal, we could hardly do otherwise than pluck one of its flowers and present it to the reader.

    What is the meaning of the word "inauspicious"?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    unfavorable, boding ill

    Click again to see term 👆

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    Terms in this set (12)

    Lastly, in lieu of these shifting scenes, came back the rude market-place of the Puritan settlement, with all the townspeople assembled and levelling their stern regards at Hester Prynne,—yes, at herself,—who stood on the scaffold of the pillory, an infant on her arm, and the letter A, in scarlet, fantastically embroidered with gold thread, upon her bosom!

    What is the effect of the underlined words in this excerpt?

    They impart a mood of distress and shame.

    Finding it so directly on the threshold of our narrative, which is now about to issue from that inauspicious portal, we could hardly do otherwise than pluck one of its flowers and present it to the reader.

    What is the meaning of the word "inauspicious"?

    unfavorable, boding ill

    Which event described in chapter 1 of The Scarlet Letter involves the narrator?

    The narrator offers the reader a rose.

    "Goodwives," said a hard-featured dame of fifty, "I'll tell ye a piece of my mind. It would be greatly for the public behoof, if we women, being of mature age and church-members in good repute, should have the handling of such malefactresses as this Hester Prynne. What think ye, gossips? If the hussy stood up for judgment before us five, that are now here in a knot together, would she come off with such a sentence as the worshipful magistrates have awarded?"

    What is the meaning of this excerpt?

    The speaker believes that she and her peers ought to be in charge of assigning sentences in cases like Hester's.

    Which event described in chapter 1 of The Scarlet Letter takes place as the story begins?

    A crowd gathers at the jail.

    "This woman has brought shame upon us all, and ought to die. Is there not law for it? Truly there is, both in the Scripture and the statute-book. Then let the magistrates, who have made it of no effect, thank themselves if their own wives and daughters go astray!"

    What part of the plot does this excerpt reveal?

    It is part of the rising action that reveals public sentiment toward Hester.

    Which event described in chapter 2 of The Scarlet Letter occurs after Hester appears in front of the crowd?

    Onlookers react to Hester's embroidered letter.

    The door of the jail being flung open from within, there appeared, in the first place, like a black shadow emerging into sunshine, the grim and grisly presence of the town-beadle, with a sword by his side and his staff of office in his hand.

    Which best describes the purpose of the words "black shadow," "grim," "grisly," and "sword"?

    to impart a solemn mood

    Certain it is, that, some fifteen or twenty years after the settlement of the town, the wooden jail was already marked with weather-stains and other indications of age, which gave a yet darker aspect to its beetle-browed and gloomy front. The rust on the ponderous iron-work of its oaken door looked more antique than any thing else in the new world.

    The author most likely include the words "darker aspect," "beetle-browed," "gloomy," and "ponderous" in order to

    impart a melancholy mood.

    Before this ugly edifice, and between it and the wheel-track of the street, was a grass-plot, much overgrown with burdock, pig-weed, apple-peru, and such unsightly vegetation, which evidently found something congenial in the soil that had so early borne the black flower of civilized society, a prison.

    Which best describes the effect of the words "ugly," "overgrown," "pig-weed," and "unsightly vegetation"?

    They establish a rough, untamed setting.

    Which event described in chapter 2 of The Scarlet Letter occurs after the women of the crowd are introduced?

    The women discuss Hester's sentence.

    Old women march Hester to the scaffold, voicing their disapproval.

    ...

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    Chapter 1: “The Prison

    Lit2Go

    Lit2Go The Scarlet Letter

    by Nathaniel Hawthorne

    CHAPTER 1: “THE PRISON-DOOR”

    Additional Information

    Year Published: 1850Language: EnglishCountry of Origin: United States of AmericaSource: Hawthorne, N. (1850). The Scarlet Letter. Boston, MA: Ticknor and Fields.Readability:

    Flesch–Kincaid Level: 11.0

    Word Count: 521Genre: TragedyKeywords: 19th century literature, american literature, nathaniel hawthorne

    ✎ Cite This Share |

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    Audio Passage PDF Student Activity

    A throng of bearded men, in sad–coloured garments and grey steeple–crowned hats, inter–mixed with women, some wearing hoods, and others bareheaded, was assembled in front of a wooden edifice, the door of which was heavily timbered with oak, and studded with iron spikes.

    The founders of a new colony, whatever Utopia of human virtue and happiness they might originally project, have invariably recognized it among their earliest practical necessities to allot a portion of the virgin soil as a cemetery, and another portion as the site of a prison. In accordance with this rule it may safely be assumed that the forefathers of Boston had built the first prison–house somewhere in the Vicinity of Cornhill, almost as seasonably as they marked out the first burial–ground, on Isaac Johnson’s lot, and round about his grave, which subsequently became the nucleus of all the congregated sepulchres in the old churchyard of King’s Chapel. Certain it is that, some fifteen or twenty years after the settlement of the town, the wooden jail was already marked with weather–stains and other indications of age, which gave a yet darker aspect to its beetle–browed and gloomy front. The rust on the ponderous iron–work of its oaken door looked more antique than anything else in the New World. Like all that pertains to crime, it seemed never to have known a youthful era. Before this ugly edifice, and between it and the wheel–track of the street, was a grass–plot, much overgrown with burdock, pig–weed, apple–pern, and such unsightly vegetation, which evidently found something congenial in the soil that had so early borne the black flower of civilised society, a prison. But on one side of the portal, and rooted almost at the threshold, was a wild rose–bush, covered, in this month of June, with its delicate gems, which might be imagined to offer their fragrance and fragile beauty to the prisoner as he went in, and to the condemned criminal as he came forth to his doom, in token that the deep heart of Nature could pity and be kind to him.

    This rose–bush, by a strange chance, has been kept alive in history; but whether it had merely survived out of the stern old wilderness, so long after the fall of the gigantic pines and oaks that originally overshadowed it, or whether, as there is far authority for believing, it had sprung up under the footsteps of the sainted Ann Hutchinson as she entered the prison–door, we shall not take upon us to determine. Finding it so directly on the threshold of our narrative, which is now about to issue from that inauspicious portal, we could hardly do otherwise than pluck one of its flowers, and present it to the reader. It may serve, let us hope, to symbolise some sweet moral blossom that may be found along the track, or relieve the darkening close of a tale of human frailty and sorrow.

    Source : etc.usf.edu

    No Fear Literature: The Scarlet Letter: Chapter 1: The Prison Door Page 1

    The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne, scene summary, scene summaries, chapter summary, chapter summaries, short summary, criticism, literary criticism, review, scene synopsis, interpretation, teaching, lesson plan.

    The Scarlet Letter

    The Scarlet Letter Nathaniel Hawthorne

    No Fear Translation No Fear

    Chapter 1: The Prison Door

    No Fear Chapter 1: The Prison Door Page 1

    Page 1

    A throng of bearded men, in sad-colored garments and gray, steeple-crowned hats, intermixed with women, some wearing hoods, and others bareheaded, was assembled in front of a wooden edifice, the door of which was heavily timbered with oak, and studded with iron spikes.

    The founders of a new colony, whatever Utopia of human virtue and happiness they might originally project, have invariably recognized it among their earliest practical necessities to allot a portion of the virgin soil as a cemetery, and another portion as the site of a prison. In accordance with this rule, it may safely be assumed that the forefathers of Boston had built the first prison-house, somewhere in the vicinity of Cornhill, almost as seasonably as they marked out the first burial-ground, on Isaac Johnson’s lot, and round about his grave, which subsequently became the nucleus of all the congregated sepulchres in the old church-yard of King’s Chapel. Certain it is, that, some fifteen or twenty years after the settlement of the town, the wooden jail was already marked with weather-stains and other indications of age, which gave a yet darker aspect to its beetle-browed and gloomy front. The rust on the ponderous iron-work of its oaken door looked more antique than any thing else in the new world. Like all that pertains to crime, it seemed never to have known a youthful era. Before this ugly edifice, and between it and the wheel-track of the street, was a grass-plot, much overgrown with burdock, pig-weed, apple-peru, and such unsightly vegetation, which evidently found something congenial in the soil that had so early borne the black flower of civilized society, a prison. But, on one side of the portal, and rooted almost at the threshold, was a wild rose-bush, covered, in this month of June, with its delicate gems, which might be imagined to offer their fragrance and fragile beauty to the prisoner as he went in, and to the condemned criminal as he came forth to his doom, in token that the deep heart of Nature could pity and be kind to him.

    This rose-bush, by a strange chance, has been kept alive in history; but whether it had merely survived out of the stern old wilderness, so long after the fall of the gigantic pines and oaks that originally overshadowed it,—or whether, as there is fair authority for believing, it had sprung up under the footsteps of the sainted Ann Hutchinson, as she entered the prison-door,—we shall not take upon us to determine. Finding it so directly on the threshold of our narrative, which is now about to issue from that inauspicious portal, we could hardly do otherwise than pluck one of its flowers and present it to the reader. It may serve, let us hope, to symbolize some sweet moral blossom, that may be found along the track, or relieve the darkening close of a tale of human frailty and sorrow.

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    James 8 month ago
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