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    read the statement. when a government fails to protect the unalienable rights of its citizens, it is the duty and right of citizens to create another form of government. this statement is the declaration of independence’s text structure. minor premise. conclusion. major premise.

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    get read the statement. when a government fails to protect the unalienable rights of its citizens, it is the duty and right of citizens to create another form of government. this statement is the declaration of independence’s text structure. minor premise. conclusion. major premise. from EN Bilgi.

    The Stylistic Artistry of the Declaration of Independence

    by Stephen E. Lucas The Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is perhaps the most masterfully written state paper of Western civilization. As Moses Coit Tyler noted almost a century ago, no assessment of it can be complete without taking into account its extraordinary merits as a work of political prose style.

    The Stylistic Artistry of the Declaration of Independence

    The Stylistic Artistry of the Declaration of Independence On This Page

    The Declaration of Independence

    by Stephen E. Lucas

    The Declaration of Independence

    The Declaration of Independence is perhaps the most masterfully written state paper of Western civilization. As Moses Coit Tyler noted almost a century ago, no assessment of it can be complete without taking into account its extraordinary merits as a work of political prose style. Although many scholars have recognized those merits, there are surprisingly few sustained studies of the stylistic artistry of the Declaration.1 This essay seeks to illuminate that artistry by probing the discourse microscopically--at the level of the sentence, phrase, word, and syllable. By approaching the Declaration in this way, we can shed light both on its literary qualities and on its rhetorical power as a work designed to convince a "candid world" that the American colonies were justified in seeking to establish themselves as an independent nation.2

    The text of the Declaration can be divided into five sections--the introduction, the preamble, the indictment of George III, the denunciation of the British people, and the conclusion. Because space does not permit us to explicate each section in full detail, we shall select features from each that illustrate the stylistic artistry of the Declaration as a whole.3

    The introduction consists of the first paragraph--a single, lengthy, periodic sentence:

    When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.4

    Taken out of context, this sentence is so general it could be used as the introduction to a declaration by any "oppressed" people. Seen within its original context, however, it is a model of subtlety, nuance, and implication that works on several levels of meaning and allusion to orient readers toward a favorable view of America and to prepare them for the rest of the Declaration. From its magisterial opening phrase, which sets the American Revolution within the whole "course of human events," to its assertion that "the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God" entitle America to a "separate and equal station among the powers of the earth," to its quest for sanction from "the opinions of mankind," the introduction elevates the quarrel with England from a petty political dispute to a major event in the grand sweep of history. It dignifies the Revolution as a contest of principle and implies that the American cause has a special claim to moral legitimacy--all without mentioning England or America by name.

    Rather than defining the Declaration's task as one of persuasion, which would doubtless raise the defenses of readers as well as imply that there was more than one publicly credible view of the British-American conflict, the introduction identifies the purpose of the Declaration as simply to "declare"--to announce publicly in explicit terms--the "causes" impelling America to leave the British empire. This gives the Declaration, at the outset, an aura of philosophical (in the eighteenth-century sense of the term) objectivity that it will seek to maintain throughout. Rather than presenting one side in a public controversy on which good and decent people could differ, the Declaration purports to do no more than a natural philosopher would do in reporting the causes of any physical event. The issue, it implies, is not one of interpretation but of observation.

    The most important word in the introduction is "necessary," which in the eighteenth century carried strongly deterministic overtones. To say an act was necessary implied that it was impelled by fate or determined by the operation of inextricable natural laws and was beyond the control of human agents. Thus Chambers's Cyclopedia defined "necessary" as "that which cannot but be, or cannot be otherwise." "The common notion of necessity and impossibility," Jonathan Edwards wrote in Freedom of the Will, "implies something that frustrates endeavor or desire. . . . That is necessary in the original and proper sense of the word, which is, or will be, notwithstanding all supposable opposition." Characterizing the Revolution as necessary suggested that it resulted from constraints that operated with lawlike force throughout the material universe and within the sphere of human action. The Revolution was not merely preferable, defensible, or justifiable. It was as inescapable, as inevitable, as unavoidable within the course of human events as the motions of the tides or the changing of the seasons within the course of natural events.5

    Investing the Revolution with connotations of necessity was particularly important because, according to the law of nations, recourse to war was lawful only when it became "necessary"--only when amicable negotiation had failed and all other alternatives for settling the differences between two states had been exhausted. Nor was the burden of necessity limited to monarchs and established nations. At the start of the English Civil War in 1642, Parliament defended its recourse to military action against Charles I in a lengthy declaration demonstrating the "Necessity to take up Arms." Following this tradition, in July 1775 the Continental Congress issued its own Declaration Setting Forth the Causes and Necessity of Their Taking Up Arms. When, a year later, Congress decided the colonies could no longer retain their liberty within the British empire, it adhered to long-established rhetorical convention by describing independence as a matter of absolute and inescapable necessity.6 Indeed, the notion of necessity was so important that in addition to appearing in the introduction of the Declaration, it was invoked twice more at crucial junctures in the rest of the text and appeared frequently in other congressional papers after July 4, 1776.7

    Source : www.archives.gov

    [Answered] When a government fails to protect the unalienable rights of its citizens, it is the duty

    When a government fails to protect the unalienable rights of its citizens, it is the duty and right of citizens to create another form of government. - 1413382

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    Based on the choices provided the answer is major premise. This diagrams a subject's unalienable rights and enables the general population to supplant the legislature when it winds up noticeably ruinous. The Declaration of Independence is sorted out into five unmistakable portions with each fragment

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    The Declaration of Independence Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like How does Jefferson support his major premise in the body of the Declaration of Independence?, Which best describes the structure of the Declaration of Independence?, Which of the following is a central idea in the conclusion of the Declaration of Independence? and more.

    The Declaration of Independence

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    How does Jefferson support his major premise in the body of the Declaration of Independence?

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    He lists the abuses the colonies have suffered under British rule.

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    Which best describes the structure of the Declaration of Independence?

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    introduction and thesis › list of reasons why the British government is oppressive › conclusion that the colonies must separate

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    1/10 Created by Katie_Shrock

    Terms in this set (10)

    How does Jefferson support his major premise in the body of the Declaration of Independence?

    He lists the abuses the colonies have suffered under British rule.

    Which best describes the structure of the Declaration of Independence?

    introduction and thesis › list of reasons why the British government is oppressive › conclusion that the colonies must separate

    Which of the following is a central idea in the conclusion of the Declaration of Independence?

    The colonists have the right to separate from Britain's oppressive rule.

    Which best describes how Jefferson organizes his argument in the body of the Declaration of Independence?

    by listing the ways in which the King of England has oppressed the colonists

    Jefferson aimed to unite the colonists in writing the Declaration of Independence. How does the structure of the document support his purpose?

    He concludes by stating that representatives from all thirteen colonies support the document.

    In the introduction of the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson explains the way a government should function. In the body of the document,

    he illustrates how the king of England is not living up to these expectations.

    Jefferson begins the introduction to the Declaration of Independence by stating his major premise and giving examples, and then explains

    the relationship between the colonies and Britain.

    Read the statement.When a government fails to protect the unalienable rights of its citizens, it is the duty and right of citizens to create another form of government.This statement is the Declaration of Independence's

    major premise

    Which of the following best describes Thomas Jefferson's purpose in writing the Declaration of Independence?

    to unite the colonists against the British government

    Read the quotation from the Declaration of Independence."[The king] has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions."Which best describes the colonists' attitude toward American Indians?

    fearful and mistrusting

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