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    read the excerpt from president reagan’s address at moscow state university. but progress is not foreordained. the key is freedom—freedom of thought, freedom of information, freedom of communication. which is true of these lines? repetition is used to emphasize the importance of freedom. repetition is used to argue that progress is inevitable. allusion is used to emphasize the importance of freedom. allusion is used to argue that progress is inevitable.

    James

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    get read the excerpt from president reagan’s address at moscow state university. but progress is not foreordained. the key is freedom—freedom of thought, freedom of information, freedom of communication. which is true of these lines? repetition is used to emphasize the importance of freedom. repetition is used to argue that progress is inevitable. allusion is used to emphasize the importance of freedom. allusion is used to argue that progress is inevitable. from EN Bilgi.

    Rhetoric in Reagan's Address at Moscow State University Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like Which line from President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University shows that one purpose of the speech was to build connections between the Soviet Union and the US?, Read the excerpt from Ronald Reagan's Address at Moscow State University. Freedom, it has been said, makes people selfish and materialistic, but Americans are one of the most religious peoples on Earth. Because they know that liberty, just as life itself, is not earned but a gift from God, they seek to share that gift with the world. "Reason and experience," said George Washington in his farewell address, "both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle. And it is substantially true, that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government." Check all that apply. The underlined words in this excerpt are, Both Americans and Soviet citizens listened to President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University. Which best describes the different purposes of the speech for American and Soviet audiences? and more.

    Rhetoric in Reagan's Address at Moscow State University

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    Which line from President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University shows that one purpose of the speech was to build connections between the Soviet Union and the US?

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    Our ties to you are more than ones of good feeling; they're ties of kinship.

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    Read the excerpt from Ronald Reagan's Address at Moscow State University.

    Freedom, it has been said, makes people selfish and materialistic, but Americans are one of the most religious peoples on Earth. Because they know that liberty, just as life itself, is not earned but a gift from God, they seek to share that gift with the world. "Reason and experience," said George Washington in his farewell address, "both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle. And it is substantially true, that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government."

    Check all that apply.

    The underlined words in this excerpt are

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    A., C., and E.

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    Terms in this set (17)

    Which line from President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University shows that one purpose of the speech was to build connections between the Soviet Union and the US?

    Our ties to you are more than ones of good feeling; they're ties of kinship.

    Read the excerpt from Ronald Reagan's Address at Moscow State University.

    Freedom, it has been said, makes people selfish and materialistic, but Americans are one of the most religious peoples on Earth. Because they know that liberty, just as life itself, is not earned but a gift from God, they seek to share that gift with the world. "Reason and experience," said George Washington in his farewell address, "both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle. And it is substantially true, that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government."

    Check all that apply.

    The underlined words in this excerpt are

    A., C., and E.

    Both Americans and Soviet citizens listened to President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University. Which best describes the different purposes of the speech for American and Soviet audiences?

    Reagan's purpose was to remind Americans of their freedoms and to encourage Soviets to allow more individual freedom.

    Read the excerpt from President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University.

    But progress is not foreordained. The key is freedom—freedom of thought, freedom of information, freedom of communication.

    Which is true of these lines?

    Repetition is used to emphasize the importance of freedom.

    Making a bandwagon appeal in a persuasive speech is an example of using

    unsubstantiated opinion.

    The audience for President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University included young college students. This is important because one of the purposes of the speech was to

    encourage new ideas, and young people are more likely to accept new ideas.

    Which line from President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University best substantiates his opinion that small businesses are moving the technological revolution?

    One of the largest personal computer firms in the United States was started by two college students, no older than you, in the garage behind their home.

    The recurrence of words or phrases in a rhetorical device is known as

    repetition.

    One purpose of President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University was to

    IT IS NOT persuade listeners to vote President Reagan into office.

    Read the excerpt from President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University.

    Some people, even in my own country, look at the riot of experiment that is the free market and see only waste. What of all the entrepreneurs that fail? Well, many do, particularly the successful ones; often several times. And if you ask them the secret of their success, they'll tell you it's all that they learned in their struggles along the way; yes, it's what they learned from failing.

    President Reagan includes the underlined question to

    raise an objection to his own opinion and counter that argument.

    Read the line from President Reagan's Address at Moscow State University.

    Go into any schoolroom, and there you will see children being taught . . . certain unalienable rights—among them life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

    What is the purpose of this line?

    to persuade listeners of the importance of freedom

    A substantiated opinion is best supported by

    expert opinions.

    Read the excerpt from President Ronald Reagan's Address at Moscow State University.

    The explorers of the modern era are the entrepreneurs, men with vision, with the courage to take risks and faith enough to brave the unknown. These entrepreneurs and their small enterprises are responsible for almost all the economic growth in the United States. They are the prime movers of the technological revolution. In fact, one of the largest personal computer firms in the United States was started by two college students, no older than you, in the garage behind their home. Some people, even in my own country, look at the riot of experiment that is the free market and see only waste. What of all the entrepreneurs that fail? Well, many do, particularly the successful ones; often several times. And if you ask them the secret of their success, they'll tell you it's all that they learned in their struggles along the way; yes, it's what they learned from failing. Like an athlete in competition or a scholar in pursuit of the truth, experience is the greatest teacher.

    Source : quizlet.com

    Read the excerpt from President Reagan’s Address at Moscow State University. But progress is not foreordained. The key is freedom—freedom of – Let's Answer The World!

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    27 APRIL 2021 BY HAKAN TOKMAK

    Read the excerpt from President Reagan’s Address at Moscow State University. But progress is not foreordained. The key is freedom—freedom of

    Read the excerpt from President Reagan’s Address at Moscow State University.

    But progress is not foreordained. The key is freedom—freedom of thought, freedom of information, freedom of communication.

    Which is true of these lines?

    Repetition is used to emphasize the importance of freedom.

    Repetition is used to argue that progress is inevitable.

    Allusion is used to emphasize the importance of freedom.

    Allusion is used to argue that progress is inevitable.

    Source : www.askmathematics.com

    Remarks and a Question

    053188b

    Remarks and a Question-and-Answer Session With the Students and Faculty at Moscow State University

    May 31, 1988

    The President. Thank you, Rector Logunov, and I want to thank all of you very much for a very warm welcome. It's a great pleasure to be here at Moscow State University, and I want to thank you all for turning out. I know you must be very busy this week, studying and taking your final examinations. So, let me just say zhelayu vam uspekha [I wish you success]. Nancy couldn't make it today because she's visiting Leningrad, which she tells me is a very beautiful city, but she, too, says hello and wishes you all good luck.

    Let me say it's also a great pleasure to once again have this opportunity to speak directly to the people of the Soviet Union. Before I left Washington, I received many heartfelt letters and telegrams asking me to carry here a simple message, perhaps, but also some of the most important business of this summit: It is a message of peace and good will and hope for a growing friendship and closeness between our two peoples.

    As you know, I've come to Moscow to meet with one of your most distinguished graduates. In this, our fourth summit, General Secretary Gorbachev and I have spent many hours together, and I feel that we're getting to know each other well. Our discussions, of course, have been focused primarily on many of the important issues of the day, issues I want to touch on with you in a few moments. But first I want to take a little time to talk to you much as I would to any group of university students in the United States. I want to talk not just of the realities of today but of the possibilities of tomorrow.

    Standing here before a mural of your revolution, I want to talk about a very different revolution that is taking place right now, quietly sweeping the globe without bloodshed or conflict. Its effects are peaceful, but they will fundamentally alter our world, shatter old assumptions, and reshape our lives. It's easy to underestimate because it's not accompanied by banners or fanfare. It's been called the technological or information revolution, and as its emblem, one might take the tiny silicon chip, no bigger than a fingerprint. One of these chips has more computing power than a roomful of old-style computers.

    As part of an exchange program, we now have an exhibition touring your country that shows how information technology is transforming our lives -- replacing manual labor with robots, forecasting weather for farmers, or mapping the genetic code of DNA for medical researchers. These microcomputers today aid the design of everything from houses to cars to spacecraft; they even design better and faster computers. They can translate English into Russian or enable the blind to read or help Michael Jackson produce on one synthesizer the sounds of a whole orchestra. Linked by a network of satellites and fiber-optic cables, one individual with a desktop computer and a telephone commands resources unavailable to the largest governments just a few years ago.

    Like a chrysalis, we're emerging from the economy of the Industrial Revolution -- an economy confined to and limited by the Earth's physical resources -- into, as one economist titled his book, "The Economy in Mind,'' in which there are no bounds on human imagination and the freedom to create is the most precious natural resource. Think of that little computer chip. Its value isn't in the sand from which it is made but in the microscopic architecture designed into it by ingenious human minds. Or take the example of the satellite relaying this broadcast around the world, which replaces thousands of tons of copper mined from the Earth and molded into wire. In the new economy, human invention increasingly makes physical resources obsolete. We're breaking through the material conditions of existence to a world where man creates his own destiny. Even as we explore the most advanced reaches of science, we're returning to the age-old wisdom of our culture, a wisdom contained in the book of Genesis in the Bible: In the beginning was the spirit, and it was from this spirit that the material abundance of creation issued forth.

    But progress is not foreordained. The key is freedom -- freedom of thought, freedom of information, freedom of communication. The renowned scientist, scholar, and founding father of this university, Mikhail Lomonosov, knew that. "It is common knowledge,'' he said, "that the achievements of science are considerable and rapid, particularly once the yoke of slavery is cast off and replaced by the freedom of philosophy.'' You know, one of the first contacts between your country and mine took place between Russian and American explorers. The Americans were members of Cook's last voyage on an expedition searching for an Arctic passage; on the island of Unalaska, they came upon the Russians, who took them in, and together with the native inhabitants, held a prayer service on the ice.

    The explorers of the modern era are the entrepreneurs, men with vision, with the courage to take risks and faith enough to brave the unknown. These entrepreneurs and their small enterprises are responsible for almost all the economic growth in the United States. They are the prime movers of the technological revolution. In fact, one of the largest personal computer firms in the United States was started by two college students, no older than you, in the garage behind their home. Some people, even in my own country, look at the riot of experiment that is the free market and see only waste. What of all the entrepreneurs that fail? Well, many do, particularly the successful ones; often several times. And if you ask them the secret of their success, they'll tell you it's all that they learned in their struggles along the way; yes, it's what they learned from failing. Like an athlete in competition or a scholar in pursuit of the truth, experience is the greatest teacher.

    Source : www.reaganlibrary.gov

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