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    president lyndon b. johnson decided not to run in the 1964 election. won the 1964 election by a narrow margin. won the 1964 election by a wide margin. lost the 1964 election by a narrow margin.

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    1964 United States presidential election

    1964 United States presidential election

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    1964 United States presidential election

    ← 1960 November 3, 1964 1968 →

    538 members of the Electoral College

    270 electoral votes needed to win

    Turnout 61.9%[1] 0.1 pp

    Nominee Lyndon B. Johnson Barry Goldwater

    Party Democratic Republican

    Home state Texas Arizona

    Running mate Hubert Humphrey William E. Miller

    Electoral vote 486 52

    States carried 44 + DC 6

    Popular vote 43,129,040 27,175,754

    Percentage 61.1% 38.5%

    Presidential election results map. Blue denotes states won by Johnson/Humphrey and red denotes those won by Goldwater/Miller. Numbers indicate electoral votes cast by each state.

    President before election

    Lyndon B. Johnson Democratic

    Elected President

    Lyndon B. Johnson Democratic

    The 1964 United States presidential election was the 45th quadrennial presidential election. It was held on Tuesday, November 3, 1964. Incumbent Democratic United States President Lyndon B. Johnson defeated Barry Goldwater, the Republican nominee, in a landslide. With 61.1% of the popular vote, Johnson won the largest share of the popular vote of any candidate since the largely uncontested 1820 election.

    Johnson took office on November 22, 1963, following the assassination of his predecessor, John F. Kennedy. He easily defeated a primary challenge by segregationist Governor George Wallace of Alabama, to win the nomination to a full term. At the 1964 Democratic National Convention, Johnson also won the nomination of his preferred running mate, Senator Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota. Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona, a leader of his party's conservative faction, defeated liberal Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York and Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania at the 1964 Republican National Convention.

    Johnson championed his passage of the Civil Rights Act, and advocated a series of anti-poverty programs collectively known as the Great Society. Goldwater espoused a low-tax, small-government philosophy. Although he supported previous attempts to pass civil rights legislation in 1957 and 1960, as well as the 24th Amendment outlawing the poll tax, Goldwater reluctantly opposed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as he felt that Title II violated individual liberty and states' rights. Democrats successfully portrayed Goldwater as a dangerous extremist, most famously in the "Daisy" television advertisement. The Republicans were divided between its moderate and conservative factions, with Rockefeller and other moderate party leaders refusing to campaign for Goldwater. Johnson led by wide margins in all opinion polls conducted during the campaign, although his lead continued to dwindle throughout.

    Johnson carried 44 states and the District of Columbia, which voted for the first time in this election. Goldwater won his home state and swept the states of the Deep South, most of which had not voted for a Republican presidential candidate since the end of Reconstruction in 1877. This was the last time that the Democratic Party won the white vote, although they came close in 1992. This was the first-ever and only election before 1992 in which the Democrats carried Vermont, and the first election since 1912 in which the Democrats carried Maine. Conversely, it was also the first-ever election in which the Republicans carried Georgia.

    This was the last election in which the Democratic nominee carried Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, all of Nebraska,[a] Kansas, or Oklahoma, and the only election ever in which the Democrat carried Alaska. As such, this was the most recent presidential election in which the entire Midwestern region voted Democratic. Iowa and Oregon would not vote Democratic again until 1988, California, Colorado, Illinois, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, and Vermont would not vote Democratic again until 1992, while Indiana and Virginia would not vote Democratic again until 2008. As of 2022, this marks the last time that a Democratic presidential candidate has won more than 400 electoral votes.

    Johnson's landslide victory coincided with the defeat of many conservative Republican congressmen. The subsequent 89th Congress would pass major legislation such as the Social Security Amendments of 1965 and the Voting Rights Act. The 1964 election marked the beginning of a major, long-term re-alignment in American politics, as Goldwater's unsuccessful bid significantly influenced the modern conservative movement. The movement of conservatives to the Republican Party continued, culminating in the 1980 presidential victory of Ronald Reagan.

    Contents

    1 Assassination of President John F. Kennedy

    2 Nominations

    2.1 Democratic Party

    2.1.1 Candidates

    2.2 Republican Party

    2.2.1 Candidates 2.2.2 Primaries 2.2.3 Convention

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

    Electoral Myth and Reality: The 1964 Election on JSTOR

    Philip E. Converse, Aage R. Clausen, Warren E. Miller, Electoral Myth and Reality: The 1964 Election, The American Political Science Review, Vol. 59, No. 2 (Jun., 1965), pp. 321-336

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    JOURNAL ARTICLE

    Philip E. Converse, Aage R. Clausen and Warren E. Miller

    The American Political Science Review

    , pp. 321-336 (16 pages)

    Published By: American Political Science Association

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/1953052

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    The American Political Science Review (APSR) is the longest running publication of the American Political Science Association (APSA). APSR, first published in November 1906 and appearing quarterly, is the preeminent political science journal in the United States and internationally. APSR features research from all fields of political science and contains an extensive book review section of the discipline. In its earlier days, APSR also covered the personal and personnel items of the profession as had its predecessor, the Proceedings of the APSA.

    Founded in 1903, the American Political Science Association is the major professional society for individuals engaged in the study of politics and government. APSA brings together political scientists from all fields of inquiry, regions, and occupational endeavors. While most APSA members are scholars who teach and conduct research in colleges and universities in the U.S. and abroad, one-fourth work outside academe in government, research, organizations, consulting firms, the news media, and private enterprise. For more information about the APSA, its publications and programs, please see the APSA website.

    This item is part of a JSTOR Collection.

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    The American Political Science Review © 1965 American Political Science Association

    Source : www.jstor.org

    Lyndon B. Johnson

    In the presidential election of 1964, Johnson was opposed by conservative Republican Barry Goldwater. During the campaign Johnson portrayed himself as level-headed and reliable and suggested that Goldwater was a reckless extremist who might lead the country into a nuclear war. When Republican supporters of Goldwater declared, “In your heart, you know he’s right,” Democrats responded by saying, “In your heart, you know he might.” Goldwater’s remark to a reporter that, if he could, he would “drop a low-yield atomic bomb on Chinese supply lines in Vietnam” did nothing to reassure voters. On election day Johnson defeated Goldwater easily, receiving

    Election and the Vietnam War

    In the presidential election of 1964, Johnson was opposed by conservative Republican Barry Goldwater. During the campaign Johnson portrayed himself as level-headed and reliable and suggested that Goldwater was a reckless extremist who might lead the country into a nuclear war. When Republican supporters of Goldwater declared, “In your heart, you know he’s right,” Democrats responded by saying, “In your heart, you know he might.” Goldwater’s remark to a reporter that, if he could, he would “drop a low-yield atomic bomb on Chinese supply lines in Vietnam” did nothing to reassure voters. On election day Johnson defeated Goldwater easily, receiving more than 61 percent of the popular vote, the largest percentage ever for a presidential election; the vote in the electoral college was 486 to 52. Johnson interpreted his victory as an extraordinary mandate to push forward with his Great Society reforms.

    Lyndon B. Johnson campaign button

    Button from Lyndon B. Johnson's 1964 U.S. presidential campaign.

    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    Lyndon B. Johnson campaign button

    Button from Lyndon B. Johnson's 1964 U.S. presidential campaign.

    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    American presidential election, 1964

    Results of the American presidential election, 1964. Sources: Electoral and popular vote totals based on data from the Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives and Congressional Quarterly's Guide to U.S. Elections, 4th ed. (2001).

    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    Analyze the effects of the Tonkin Gulf Resolution passed under the Johnson administration amid the Vietnam War

    In August 1964, in response to an alleged attack by North Vietnamese patrol boats on U.S. destroyers in the Gulf of Tonkin, the U.S. Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to take any action necessary to deal with threats against U.S. forces and allies in Southeast Asia. From Vietnam Perspective (1985), a documentary by Encyclopædia Britannica Educational Corporation.

    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    See all videos for this article

    In early August 1964, after North Vietnamese gunboats allegedly attacked U.S. destroyers in the Gulf of Tonkin near the coast of North Vietnam without provocation, Johnson ordered retaliatory bombing raids on North Vietnamese naval installations and, in a televised address to the nation, proclaimed, “We still seek no wider war.” Two days later, at Johnson’s request, Congress overwhelmingly passed the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, which authorized the president to take “all necessary measures to repel any armed attack against the forces of the United States and to prevent further aggression.” In effect, the measure granted Johnson the constitutional authority to conduct a war in Vietnam without a formal declaration from Congress. Although there were contradictory reports about the “engagement” in the gulf—about which side did what, if anything, and when—Johnson never discussed them with the public.

    BRITANNICA QUIZ

    U.S. Presidents and Their Years in Office Quiz

    The president of the United States serves a four-year term, and until 1951 a president had no limits on the number of terms. This quiz will show you the years a president served. You’ll need to identify the president.

    Despite his campaign pledges not to widen American military involvement in Vietnam, Johnson soon increased the number of U.S. troops in that country and expanded their mission. In February 1965, after an attack by Viet Cong guerrillas on an U.S. military base in Pleiku, Johnson ordered “Operation Rolling Thunder,” a series of massive bombing raids on North Vietnam intended to cut supply lines to North Vietnamese and Viet Cong fighters in the South; he also dispatched 3,500 Marines to protect the border city of Da Nang. Fifty thousand additional troops were sent in July, and by the end of the year the number of military personnel in the country had reached 180,000. The number increased steadily over the next two years, peaking at about 550,000 in 1968.

    Lyndon B. Johnson: button and ribbon

    Commemorative button and ribbon from Lyndon B. Johnson's inauguration as U.S. president, c. 1965.

    Americana/Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

    Creighton Abrams and Lyndon B. Johnson

    Creighton Abrams, U.S. commander in South Vietnam, speaking as Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson (centre) and his advisers listen, 1968.

    U.S. Department of Defense

    As each new American escalation met with fresh enemy response and as no end to the combat appeared in sight, the president’s public support declined steeply. American casualties gradually mounted, reaching nearly 500 a week by the end of 1967. Moreover, the enormous financial cost of the war, reaching $25 billion in 1967, diverted money from Johnson’s cherished Great Society programs and began to fuel inflation. Beginning in 1965, student demonstrations grew larger and more frequent and helped to stimulate resistance to the draft. From 1967 onward, antiwar sentiment gradually spread among other segments of the population, including liberal Democrats, intellectuals, and civil rights leaders, and by 1968 many prominent political figures, some of them former supporters of the president’s Vietnam policies, were publicly calling for an early negotiated settlement of the war. As his popularity sank to new lows in 1967, Johnson was confronted by demonstrations almost everywhere he went. It pained him to hear protesters, especially students—who he thought would venerate him for his progressive social agenda—chanting, “Hey, hey, LBJ, how many kids did you kill today?” To avoid the demonstrations, he eventually restricted his travels, becoming a virtual “prisoner” in the White House.

    Source : www.britannica.com

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