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    over time, alcohol can make it difficult for the body to soak up bone-building ________ .

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    What People Recovering From Alcoholism Need To Know About Osteoporosis

    Alcoholism and recovery Alcoholism is a disease characterized by a dependency on alcohol. Because alcohol affects almost every organ in the body, chronic heavy drinking is associated with many serious health problems, including osteoporosis. Maintaining sobriety is undoubtedly the most important health goal for individuals recovering from alcoholism. However, attention to other aspects of health, including bone health, can help increase the likelihood of a healthy future, free from the devastating consequences of osteoporosis and fracture.

    What People Recovering From Alcoholism Need To Know About Osteoporosis

    What People Recovering From Alcoholism Need To Know About Osteoporosis Alcoholism and recovery

    Alcoholism is a disease characterized by a dependency on alcohol. Because alcohol affects almost every organ in the body, chronic heavy drinking is associated with many serious health problems, including osteoporosis.

    Maintaining sobriety is undoubtedly the most important health goal for individuals recovering from alcoholism. However, attention to other aspects of health, including bone health, can help increase the likelihood of a healthy future, free from the devastating consequences of osteoporosis and fracture.

    What is osteoporosis?

    The link between alcohol and osteoporosis

    Osteoporosis management strategies

    Resources

    For your information

    What is osteoporosis?

    Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones become less dense and more likely to fracture. Fractures from osteoporosis can result in significant pain and disability. In the United States, more than 53 million people either already have osteoporosis or are at high risk due to low bone mass.

    Risk factors for developing osteoporosis include:

    Thinness or small frame.

    Being postmenopausal and particularly having had early menopause.

    Abnormal absence of menstrual periods (amenorrhea).

    Prolonged use of certain medications, such as those used to treat lupus, asthma, thyroid deficiencies, and seizures.

    Low calcium intake.

    Lack of physical activity.

    Smoking.

    Excessive alcohol intake.

    Osteoporosis often can be prevented. It is known as a silent disease because, if undetected, bone loss can progress for many years without symptoms until a fracture occurs. Osteoporosis has been called a childhood disease with old age consequences because building healthy bones in one’s youth helps prevent osteoporosis and fractures later in life. However, it is never too late to adopt new habits for healthy bones.

    The link between alcohol and osteoporosis

    Alcohol negatively affects bone health for several reasons. To begin with, excessive alcohol interferes with the balance of calcium, an essential nutrient for healthy bones. Calcium balance may be further disrupted by alcohol’s ability to interfere with the production of vitamin D, a vitamin essential for calcium absorption.

    In addition, chronic heavy drinking can cause hormone deficiencies in men and women. Men with alcoholism may produce less testosterone, a hormone linked to the production of osteoblasts (the cells that stimulate bone formation). In women, chronic alcohol exposure can trigger irregular menstrual cycles, a factor that reduces estrogen levels, increasing the risk for osteoporosis. Also, cortisol levels may be elevated in people with alcoholism. Cortisol is known to decrease bone formation and increase bone breakdown.

    Because of the effects of alcohol on balance and gait, people with alcoholism tend to fall more frequently than those without the disorder. Heavy alcohol consumption has been linked to an increase in the risk of fracture, including the most serious kind—hip fracture. Vertebral fractures are also more common in chronic heavy drinkers.

    Osteoporosis management strategies

    The most effective strategy for alcohol-induced bone loss is abstinence. People with alcoholism who abstain from drinking tend to have a rapid recovery of osteoblastic (bone-building) activity. Some studies have even found that lost bone can be partially restored when alcohol abuse ends.

    Nutrition. Because of the negative nutritional effects of chronic alcohol use, people recovering from alcoholism should make healthy nutritional habits a top priority. As far as bone health is concerned, a well-balanced diet rich in calcium and vitamin D is critical. Good sources of calcium include low-fat dairy products; dark green, leafy vegetables; and calcium-fortified foods and beverages. Supplements can help ensure that you get adequate amounts of calcium each day, especially in people with a proven milk allergy. The Institute of Medicine recommends a daily calcium intake of 1,000 mg (milligrams) for men and women up to age 50. Women over age 50 and men over age 70 should increase their intake to 1,200 mg daily.

    Vitamin D plays an important role in calcium absorption and bone health. Food sources of vitamin D include egg yolks, saltwater fish, and liver. Many people, especially those who are older or housebound, may need vitamin D supplements to achieve the recommended intake of 600 to 800 IU (International Units) each day.

    Exercise. Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds to exercise by becoming stronger. The best activities for your bones are weight-bearing and resistance exercises. Weight-bearing exercises force you to work against gravity. They include walking, climbing stairs, and dancing. Resistance exercises – such as lifting weights – can also strengthen bones. Regular exercise, such as walking, may help prevent bone loss and can provide many other health benefits.Healthy lifestyle. Smoking is bad for bones as well as the heart and lungs. Women who smoke tend to go through menopause earlier, resulting in earlier reduction in levels of the bone-preserving hormone estrogen and triggering earlier bone loss. In addition, people who smoke may absorb less calcium from their diets.Bone density test. A bone mineral density (BMD) test measures bone density in various parts of the body. This safe and painless test can detect osteoporosis before a fracture occurs and can predict a person’s chances of fracturing in the future. The BMD test can help determine whether medication should be considered. Individuals in recovery from alcoholism are encouraged to talk to their health care providers about whether they might be candidates for a BMD test.

    Source : www.bones.nih.gov

    Alcohol and Osteoporosis: How Does Drinking Affect Your Bone Health?

    Learn more about alcohol plays a role in bone health, bone density, and osteoporosis risk.

    Home Diet & Exercise

    DIET & EXERCISE

    Alcohol and Osteoporosis: How Does Drinking Affect Your Bone Health?

    PUBLISHED 12/18/19 BY Diana Kelly Levey

    Is a little alcohol ever safe if you’re at risk for osteoporosis or low bone density? Find out what science and experts have to say.

    When it comes to how much alcohol is healthy for adults to consume, you may have heard the oft-stated recommendation that it’s generally safe for most women to have one drink of alcohol per day and for most men to have drinks two daily. But if you have osteoporosis or low bone density (osteopenia), is it still safe to drink alcohol?

    Osteoporosis is a degenerative disease that causes bones to be weakened and thinned to the point that they can fracture more easily. Alcohol can play a role in how dense bones are, the speed with which bone cells rebuild, and how your body absorbs important bone-forming nutrients. Alcohol consumption can be an important consideration when it comes to osteoporosis prevention and management.

    You should talk to your physician for their recommendations about alcohol consumption and your specific health conditions, your health history, and use with medications you’ve been prescribed.

    Here, learn more about considerations to keep in mind when it comes to the connection between alcohol and osteoporosis.

    Is Moderate Alcohol Good or Bad for Bone Health?

    Depending on which articles you read, you may come across mixed headlines about whether drinking alcohol in moderation is good or bad for your bone health.

    Some studies point out potential benefits of alcohol for bone health: A 2008 study in the American Journal of Medicine found that people who consume about one alcoholic drink a day had lower risk of hip fractures than abstainers. Earlier British research concluded that women over 65 who consumed more than five drinks per week had lower risks of vertebral deformity than those who had one drink per week.

    However, much of the research on alcohol and osteoporosis risk is observational, which means that it can’t conclude cause and effect. More recently, updated science has challenged the idea that drinking alcohol is “good” for bone health.

    For example, an analysis of six studies found published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence earlier this year found a positive relationship between alcohol consumption and osteoporosis — in other words, that alcohol was linked with greater odds of osteoporosis. The study found that compared with abstainers:

    People who consumed 0.5 to 1 drink per day had 1.38 times the risk of developing osteoporosis.

    People who consumed 1 to 2 drinks per day had 1.34 times the risk of developing osteoporosis.

    People who consumed 2 drinks or more per day had 1.63 times the risk of developing osteoporosis.

    The Challenges of Studying Alcohol Consumption

    “Alcohol is very challenging to study and the variability of the results in these studies is most likely because most of the effects of moderate alcohol consumption on bone are subtle,” says Russell T. Turner, PhD, a researcher at the Skeletal Biology Laboratory at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon who studies how exercise, nutrition, and lifestyle interact to influence skeletal health. “If alcohol has any beneficial or detrimental effect, it’s probably going to be over a really long term.”

    For one thing, alcohol consumption in many of these studies is self-reported. Study participants might have to think back on whether they had one drink a day or two over the past year, explains Dr. Turner. Their memory versus actual occurrence could lead to discrepancies. Then you have to factor in that the size of one person’s alcoholic drink (like wine) may differ significantly from person to person.

    Dr. Turner worked on a review of studies published in the journal Alcoholism, Clinical, and Experimental Research that found that light-to-moderate drinking might have beneficial effects on older adults by slowing bone remodeling, though he says that alcohol’s effect on younger adults’ skeleton and bone remodeling is less certain. “In people who are careful, moderate drinkers, then it’s unlikely that [alcohol] is going to lead to any type of skeletal issue,” he says.

    In another example, a small study in the journal Menopause on postmenopausal women found that when women stopped drinking alcohol for two weeks, they showed increased markers of bone turnover (which increases the risk of osteoporosis). When the women resumed alcohol consumption, they had slower bone turnover.

    “One of the big risk factors for osteoporosis in the aging population is elevated bone turnover,” says Dr. Turner. “That influences the quality of the bone. This study suggested that in this population that some alcohol might be beneficial. Lowering bone turnover in a younger, growing person, however, may not be so good. So age may be an important factor,” he says.

    That said, “until we can do a controlled study and come up with a marker that shows how much alcohol someone has consumed, then one study’s going to show a positive, another study’s going to show a neutral, another study’s going to show negative impact on bone health,” says Dr. Turner. “The likely reason we’re seeing this [variability] is that, in reality, there is likely not much of a positive or negative effect [on bone health] from moderate alcohol consumption.”

    Source : creakyjoints.org

    Alcohol Effects on Bones, Risk for Osteoporosis

    Heavy drinking and alcohol use has been linked with osteoporosis and risk of serious fractures.

    Osteoporosis Feature Stories

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    Drink Less for Strong Bones

    Tips to avoid getting tipsy.

    By Jeanie Lerche Davis

    Medically Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on June 21, 2010

    FROM THE WEBMD ARCHIVES

    Heavy drinking is a health risk for many reasons, including the effects on bones.

    Research shows that chronic heavy alcohol use, especially during adolescence and young adult years, can dramatically affect bone health and increase the risk of osteoporosis later in life.

    What do doctors advise? Drink less for strong bones.

    Calcium is an essential nutrient for healthy bones, and alcohol is its enemy. "Alcohol has multiple effects on calcium," says Primal Kaur, MD, an osteoporosis specialist at Temple University Health System in Philadelphia. "The bones deteriorate because not enough calcium is getting into bones -- and the body is leaching it away from bones."

    How Does Alcohol Harm Your Bones?

    When you imbibe too much -- 2 to 3 ounces of alcohol every day -- the stomach does not absorb calcium adequately, Kaur explains. "Alcohol interferes with the pancreas and its absorption of calcium and vitamin D. Alcohol also affects the liver, which is important for activating vitamin D -- which is also important for calcium absorption."

    The hormones important to bone health also go awry. Some studies suggest that alcohol decreases estrogen and can lead to irregular periods. As estrogen declines, bone remodeling slows and leads to bone loss. If you're in the menopausal years, this adds to the bone loss that's naturally occurring, says Kaur.

    There's an increase in two potentially bone-damaging hormones, cortisol and parathyroid hormone. High levels of cortisol seen in people with alcoholism can decrease bone formation and increase bone breakdown. Chronic alcohol consumption also increases parathyroid hormone, which leaches calcium from the bone, she says.

    Also, excess alcohol kills osteoblasts, the bone-making cells, Kaur adds. To compound the problem, nutritional deficiencies from heavy drinking can lead to peripheral neuropathy -- nerve damage to hands and feet. And chronic alcohol abuse can affect balance, which can lead to falls, she explains.

    Drinking and Your Risk of Fracture

    Heavy drinkers are more likely to suffer frequent fractures due to brittle bones and nerve damage, especially hip and spine fractures, Kaur says. Those fractures will likely heal slowly because of malnutrition.

    When you quit drinking, your bones may recover fairly rapidly. Some studies have found that lost bone can be partially restored when alcohol abuse ends.

    If you're a smoker, it's important that you quit that habit, too. "If you are a heavy drinker who also smokes, it makes your bone problems even worse," Kaur tells WebMD. "You need to quit both habits, or osteoporosis treatment is not going to work." In fact, studies suggest that quitting smoking helps people recover from alcoholism.

    Drink Less for Strong Bones

    Summer barbecues, family get-togethers, after-work happy hours -- they're full of temptations. Everyone's drinking, having a good time. If you're used to imbibing, it's hard to say no. But if you're goal is strong bones, these tips will help you drink less.

    "It's difficult to deny yourself," says Murray Dabby, LCSW, director of the Atlanta Center for Social Therapy. "Therefore, you have to find something to say 'yes' to. ... That's the more winning strategy."

    Saying 'yes' to healthy living is a good first step, Dabby tells WebMD. "Take the focus off 'not drinking' or 'not smoking.'"

    As a coach and therapist, he asks people to understand their relationship to alcohol. "That relationship says a lot about how you see yourself -- 'I'm socially awkward, I'm shy, I'm anxious, I'm insecure, and alcohol makes me feel more comfortable.'"

    To overcome shyness alcohol, here's his suggestion: "As Shakespeare would say, 'Life is a stage. Create a new performance for yourself. Act like the person you want to be," Dabby says.

    If parties make you self-conscious, here's a positive approach: Act like you're the co-host. "Focus on making people comfortable rather than worrying about yourself," he explains. "Go around greeting everyone, asking how they know the host. Perform as if you're the friendliest person at the party. You won't need alcohol to cover up your nervousness."

    Another tactic: Pretend that you're tipsy. If you love going to karaoke bars but can't enjoy it without alcohol, simply pretend, Dabby suggests. "Order ginger ale, but act like you're tipsy." That's the approach that one person took, he tells WebMD. "It was very successful for him. He found he could ham it up without alcohol."

    If after-work happy hours are a problem, don't focus on drinking: "Focus on getting to know your co-workers. Be curious, ask questions. Focus on relationship-building, because that's a positive thing,” Dabby says. “Order ginger ale or another nonalcoholic drink. You don't have to tell anyone you have trouble with alcohol."

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    further reading

    The Basics of Bone Health and Disease

    Super Foods for Your Bones

    Boning Up on Bones

    Low-Cost Ways to Protect Your Bones

    The Effects of Smoking on Bone Health

    Osteoporosis Tips for the Tipsy

    Osteoporosis, Bone Loss and Posture: 6 Tips to Look Your Best

    Source : www.webmd.com

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