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    o-18, an isotope of oxygen, has a stable nucleus. o-19, another isotope of oxygen, does not have a stable nucleus. based on this information, which statement is correct? o-19 is radioactive; o-18 is not radioactive. o-19 has a mass defect; o-18 does not have a mass defect. o-19 has a nuclear binding energy; o-18 does not have a nuclear binding energy. o-19 has more neutrons than protons; o-18 has equal numbers of neutrons and protons.

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get o-18, an isotope of oxygen, has a stable nucleus. o-19, another isotope of oxygen, does not have a stable nucleus. based on this information, which statement is correct? o-19 is radioactive; o-18 is not radioactive. o-19 has a mass defect; o-18 does not have a mass defect. o-19 has a nuclear binding energy; o-18 does not have a nuclear binding energy. o-19 has more neutrons than protons; o-18 has equal numbers of neutrons and protons. from EN Bilgi.

    Isotopes of oxygen

    Isotopes of oxygen

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    Main isotopes of oxygen (8O)

    Iso­tope Decay

    abun­dance half-life (1/2) mode pro­duct

    16O [99.738%, 99.776%] stable

    17O [0.0367%, 0.0400%] stable

    18O [0.187%, 0.222%] stable

    Standard atomic weight r°(O)

    [15.99903, 15.99977]

    15.999±0.001 (abridged)[1][2]

    viewtalkedit

    There are three known stable isotopes of oxygen (8O): 16

    O , 17 O , and 18 O .

    Radioactive isotopes ranging from 11

    O to 28 O

    have also been characterized, all short-lived. The longest-lived radioisotope is 15

    O

    with a half-life of 122.266(43) s, while the shortest-lived isotope is 11

    O

    with a half-life of 198(12) yoctoseconds (though the half-lives of the neutron-unbound 27

    O and 28 O are still unknown).

    Contents

    1 List of isotopes 2 Stable isotopes 3 Radioisotopes 3.1 Oxygen-13 3.2 Oxygen-15 4 See also 5 References

    List of isotopes[edit]

    Nuclide[3]

    [n 1] Isotopic mass (Da)[4]

    [n 2] Half-life

    [resonance width] Decay

    mode [n 3] Daughter isotope [n 4] Spin and parity

    [n 5][n 6] Natural abundance (mole fraction)

    Excitation energy Normal proportion Range of variation

    11 O

    [5] 8 3 11.051250(60) 198(12) ys

    [2.31(14) MeV] 2p 9 C (3/2−) 12 O

    8 4 12.034368(13) 8.9(3.3) zs 2p 10

    C 0+ 13 O

    8 5 13.024815(10) 8.58(5) ms β+ (89.1(2)%) 13

    N (3/2−) β+p (10.9(2)%) 12 C 14 O

    8 6 14.008596706(27) 70.621(11) s β+ 14

    0+

    N 15 O

    8 7 15.0030656(5) 122.266(43) s β+ 15

    1/2−

    N 16 O

    [n 7] 8 8 15.994914619257(319) Stable 0+ [0.99738, 0.99776][6]

    17 O

    [n 8] 8 9 16.999131755953(692) Stable 5/2+ [0.000367, 0.000400][6]

    18 O

    [n 7][n 9] 8 10 17.999159612136(690) Stable 0+ [0.00187, 0.00222][6]

    19 O

    8 11 19.0035780(28) 26.470(6) s β− 19

    5/2+

    F 20 O

    8 12 20.0040754(9) 13.51(5) s β− 20

    F 0+ 21 O

    8 13 21.008655(13) 3.42(10) s β− 21

    F (5/2+) β−n ?[n 10] 20 F ? 22 O

    8 14 22.009970(60) 2.25(9) s β− (> 78%) 22

    F 0+ β−n (< 22%) 21 F 23 O

    8 15 23.015700(130) 97(8) ms β− (93(2)%) 23

    F 1/2+ β−n (7(2)%) 22 F 24 O

    8 16 24.019860(180) 77.4(4.5) ms β− (57(4)%) 24

    F 0+ β−n (43(4)%) 23 F 25 O

    8 17 25.029340(180) 5.18(35) zs n 24

    O 3/2+# 26 O

    8 18 26.037210(180) 4.2(3.3) ps 2n 24

    O 0+ 27 O

    8 19 27.047960(540)# < 260 ns n ?[n 10] 26

    O ? 3/2+# 2n ?[n 10] 25 O ? 28 O

    8 20 28.055910(750)# < 100 ns 2n ?[n 10] 26

    O ? 0+ β− (0%) 28 F view

    ^ mO – Excited nuclear isomer.^ ( ) – Uncertainty (1) is given in concise form in parentheses after the corresponding last digits.^ Modes of decay:

    n: Neutron emission p: Proton emission

    ^ Bold symbol as daughter – Daughter product is stable.^ ( ) spin value – Indicates spin with weak assignment arguments.^ # – Values marked # are not purely derived from experimental data, but at least partly from trends of neighboring nuclides (TNN).

    ^ Jump up to:

    The ratio between 16

    O and 18 O

    is used to deduce ancient temperatures.

    ^ Can be used in NMR studies of metabolic pathways.^ Can be used in studying certain metabolic pathways.

    ^ Jump up to:

    Decay mode shown is energetically allowed, but has not been experimentally observed to occur in this nuclide.

    Stable isotopes[edit]

    Late in a massive star's life, 16

    O

    concentrates in the N-shell, 17

    O

    in the H-shell and 18

    O in the He-shell.

    Natural oxygen is made of three stable isotopes, 16

    O , 17 O , and 18 O , with 16 O

    being the most abundant (99.762% natural abundance). Depending on the terrestrial source, the standard atomic weight varies within the range of [15.99903, 15.99977] (the conventional value is 15.999).

    16 O

    has high relative and absolute abundance because it is a principal product of stellar evolution and because it is a primary isotope, meaning it can be made by stars that were initially hydrogen only.[7] Most 16

    O

    is synthesized at the end of the helium fusion process in stars; the triple-alpha reaction creates 12

    C

    , which captures an additional 4

    He

    nucleus to produce 16

    O

    . The neon burning process creates additional 16

    O .[7] Both 17 O and 18 O

    are secondary isotopes, meaning their synthesis requires seed nuclei. 17

    O

    is primarily made by burning hydrogen into helium in the CNO cycle, making it a common isotope in the hydrogen burning zones of stars.[7] Most 18

    O is produced when 14 N

    (made abundant from CNO burning) captures a 4

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

    Chem Unit 1 test Flashcards

    test help Learn with flashcards, games, and more — for free.

    Chem Unit 1 test

    5.0 2 Reviews

    What type of isotope undergoes radioactive decay?

    one that has a nucleus with the same number of protons and neutrons

    one that has an unstable nucleus

    one that has the same number of protons and electrons

    one that has a stable nucleus

    Click card to see definition 👆

    B. one that has an unstable nucleus

    Click again to see term 👆

    Which element has 32 protons in its nucleus?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    C. germanium

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/25 Created by AlyYev04PLUS test help

    Terms in this set (25)

    What type of isotope undergoes radioactive decay?

    one that has a nucleus with the same number of protons and neutrons

    one that has an unstable nucleus

    one that has the same number of protons and electrons

    one that has a stable nucleus

    B. one that has an unstable nucleus

    Which element has 32 protons in its nucleus?

    C. germanium

    How did Niels Bohr describe electrons in his atomic model?

    D. They orbit the central nucleus in discrete paths.

    Hydrogen has three isotopes 1H, 2H, and 3H. What is the difference between these three isotopes?

    C. the number of neutrons ranges from 0 to 2

    The emission spectrum of hydrogen shows discrete, bright, colored lines. Which characteristic of the Bohr model is best supported by this observation?

    D. Electrons cannot exist in location other than specific orbits

    What did Ernest Rutherford's gold foil experiment demonstrate about an atom?

    D. Positive charge occupies a very small volume in the atom.

    J. J. Thomson's experiment disproved which of Dalton ideas ?

    B. is indivisible.

    O-18, an isotope of oxygen, has a stable nucleus. O-19, another isotope of oxygen, does not have a stable nucleus. Based on this information, which statement is correct?

    A. O-19 is radioactive; O-18 is not radioactive.

    Who was the first to propose the existence of atoms?

    John Dalton Democritus Joseph Proust Ernest Rutherford B. Democritus

    Which quantity can be calculated using the equation E = mc2?

    A. the energy needed to split an atom into separate protons, neutrons, and electrons

    Sign up and see the remaining cards. It’s free!

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    DOE Explains...Isotopes

    DOE Explains...Isotopes

    DOE Explains...Isotopes

    Office of Science

    Hydrogen and its two naturally occurring isotopes, deuterium and tritium. All three have the same number of protons (labeled p+) but different numbers of neutrons (labeled n).

    Image courtesy of Wikimedia commons

    A family of people often consists of related but not identical individuals. Elements have families as well, known as isotopes. Isotopes are members of a family of an element that all have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons.

    The number of protons in a nucleus determines the element’s atomic number on the Periodic Table. For example, carbon has six protons and is atomic number 6. Carbon occurs naturally in three isotopes: carbon 12, which has 6 neutrons (plus 6 protons equals 12), carbon 13, which has 7 neutrons, and carbon 14, which has 8 neutrons. Every element has its own number of isotopes.

    The addition of even one neutron can dramatically change an isotope’s properties. Carbon-12 is stable, meaning it never undergoes radioactive decay. Carbon-14 is unstable and undergoes radioactive decay with a half-life of about 5,730 years (meaning that half of the material will be gone after 5,730 years). This decay means the amount of carbon-14 in an object serves as a clock, showing the object’s age in a process called “carbon dating.”

    Isotopes have unique properties, and these properties make them useful in diagnostics and treatment applications. They are important in nuclear medicine, oil and gas exploration, basic research, and national security.

    DOE Office of Science & Isotopes

    Isotopes are needed for research, commerce, medical diagnostics and treatment, and national security. However, isotopes are not always available in sufficient quantities or at reasonable prices. The DOE Isotope Program addresses this need. The program produces and distributes radioactive and stable isotopes that are in short supply, including byproducts, surplus materials, and related isotope services. The program also maintains the infrastructure required to produce and supply priority isotope products and related services. Finally, it conducts research and development on new and improved isotope production and processing techniques.

    Isotope Facts

    All elements have isotopes.

    There are two main types of isotopes: stable and unstable (radioactive).

    There are 254 known stable isotopes.

    All artificial (lab-made) isotopes are unstable and therefore radioactive; scientists call them radioisotopes.

    Some elements can only exist in an unstable form (for example, uranium).

    Hydrogen is the only element whose isotopes have unique names: deuterium for hydrogen with one neutron and tritium for hydrogen with two neutrons.

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    Scientific terms can be confusing. DOE Explains offers straightforward explanations of key words and concepts in fundamental science. It also describes how these concepts apply to the work that the Department of Energy’s Office of Science conducts as it helps the United States excel in research across the scientific spectrum.

    Source : www.energy.gov

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