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    nuclear power plants use fission reactions to produce electric power. nuclear fusion is not yet a practical energy source because it —

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    Nuclear power plants use nuclear fission reaction to produce electricity. What is the advantage of producing electricity by fusion reaction?

    Click here👆to get an answer to your question ✍️ Nuclear power plants use nuclear fission reaction to produce electricity. What is the advantage of producing electricity by fusion reaction?

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    Nuclear power plants use nuclear fission reaction to produce electricity. What is the advantage of producing electricity by fusion reaction?

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    More electricity can be produced by nuclear fusion reaction as compared to fission reaction because nuclear fusion reaction releases more amount of energy per unit mass of fuel than fission reactions.

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    15 3 SIMILAR QUESTIONS

    What is nuclear fission and nuclear fusion?

    Distinguish between nuclear fission and fusion. Show how in both these processes energy is released. Calculate the energy release in MeV in the deuterium-tritium fusion reaction :

    Easy View solution > 1 2 ​ H+ 1 3 ​ H→ 1 4 ​ He+ 0 ​ n 1 Using the data: m( 1 2 ​ H)=2.014102u m( 1 3 ​ H)=3.016049u m( 2 4 ​ He)=4.002603u mn=1.008665u lu=931.5MeV/c2 Medium View solution > View more MORE FROM CHAPTER Nuclei View chapter >

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    Fission and Fusion: What is the Difference?

    Infographic: Learn the difference between fission and fusion - two physical processes that produce massive amounts of energy from atoms.

    Office of Nuclear Energy

    Fission and Fusion: What is the Difference?

    APRIL 1, 2021

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    All of the energy we produce comes from basic chemical and physical processes.

    That’s mostly been accomplished throughout history by burning carbon-based material like wood, coal and gas—or by harnessing power from the sun, wind, and water.

    Fission and fusion are two physical processes that produce massive amounts of energy from atoms.

    They yield millions of times more energy than other sources through nuclear reactions.

    You can check out the difference between the two in this video below.

    Video Url Fission vs. Fusion

    Video courtesy of the Department of Energy

    Fission

    Fission occurs when a neutron slams into a larger atom, forcing it to excite and split into two smaller atoms—also known as fission products. Additional neutrons are also released that can initiate a chain reaction.

    When each atom splits, a tremendous amount of energy is released.

    Uranium and plutonium are most commonly used for fission reactions in nuclear power reactors because they are easy to initiate and control.

    The energy released by fission in these reactors heats water into steam. The steam is used to spin a turbine to produce carbon-free electricity.

    Click above to view our full fission vs fusion infographic.

    Fusion

    Fusion occurs when two atoms slam together to form a heavier atom, like when two hydrogen atoms fuse to form one helium atom.

    This is the same process that powers the sun and creates huge amounts of energy—several times greater than fission. It also doesn’t produce highly radioactive fission products.

    Fusion reactions are being studied by scientists, but are difficult to sustain for long periods of time because of the tremendous amount of pressure and temperature needed to join the nuclei together.

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    Source : www.energy.gov

    Nuclear fusion could be the perfect energy source — so why can't we make it work?

    Fusion is the long shot power source that could solve our energy woes forever, if only they could get it to work. Here's your complete guide.

    Nuclear fusion could be the perfect energy source — so why can't we make it work?

    By Susannah Locke Apr 16, 2014, 1:30pm EDT

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    Our Sun does fusion power just fine. So why can't we? NASA/European Space Agency

    In theory, it's possible to shoot some energy at hydrogen and get even energy back. The process is called thermonuclear fusion, and if we could ever get fusion power to work — a big if — we'd never have to worry about our energy problems again.

    IF WE COULD GET FUSION POWER TO WORK, WE'D NEVER HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT ENERGY AGAIN

    It's not a completely crazy notion. Nuclear fusion already takes place in the sun's core, after all. And the promise of fusion power has led researchers to try their best for decades upon decades. Occasionally, they even make some advances — as happened this past winter, when a group of scientists got closer to fusion power than they ever had before.

    Trouble is, the scientific and technical hurdles ahead are still enormous — in fact, we still don't have a full grasp on what all the hurdles might be. Still, the potential pay-off is so massive that countries have sunk billions and billions of dollars into fusion research.

    So here's a guide to how far humanity has come on thermonuclear fusion — and how far we still have to go.

    What is thermonuclear fusion?

    Thermonuclear fusion is the process that occurs when two atoms combine to make a larger atom, creating a whole lot of energy.

    Fusion already happens naturally in stars — including the sun — when intense pressure and heat fuse hydrogen atoms together, generating helium and energy. This process is what powers the sun and makes it so hot and bright. Researchers who work on fusion energy are essentially trying to make tiny stars here on Earth.

    Isn't fusion a violation of physics?

    No. When two atoms fuse, they lose a bit of their mass, which is released as energy. This is perfectly acceptable according to Einstein's famous E = mc2 equation, which says that mass can turn into pure energy and vice versa. (The E here stands for energy. M is for mass. C is a constant number that is the speed of light in a vacuum.)

    An illustration of the ITER machine, which, if all goes well, will be doing fusion by 2027. ITER Organization

    Don't our nuclear power plants already do fusion?

    No. Nuclear reactors perform , which involves splitting atoms apart. Fusion, by contrast, is when atoms merge together. Fusion converts more mass into energy per reaction than fission does.

    How can the sun do fusion so easily?

    The sun weighs about 333,000 times more than Earth does. That mass creates powerful gravitational forces that produce extreme pressures. This pressure, combined with temperatures up to 27 million degrees Fahrenheit, gets atoms to fuse together.

    So how do we do fusion on Earth?

    We don't have the technology to recreate the Sun's massive pressures, so researchers have to make up for that by getting hydrogen atoms even hotter than the sun does — in the range of hundreds of millions of degrees Fahrenheit. They heat up the atoms using various tools, including particle beams, electromagnetic fields such as microwaves and radio waves, and lasers.

    THE REQUIRED TEMPERATURES ARE SO HOT THAT THE HYDROGEN FUEL BECOMES A PLASMA

    The temperatures needed are so hot that the hydrogen fuel becomes a plasma, a state of matter that exists when a gas's atoms split into positively and negatively charged particles. (Stars and lightning are plasma, as is the luminous matter inside neon signs.)

    Researchers have been producing controlled fusion reactions for decades. These days, the big goal that hasn't happened yet is to make a fusion reactor that produces more energy than it takes in.

    Plasma, like lightning, is very difficult to control. Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images

    Is this the same as cold fusion?

    No. Cold fusion is the theoretical fusion of atoms at room temperature. No one has ever done cold fusion — although there have been many false claims over the years. Scientists researching fusion energy are more interested in hot fusion, which they have been doing the 1930s — the challenge now is just how to turn it into useful energy.

    How are we trying to do fusion now?

    There are many approaches. Here are the two most worth watching.

    1) Magnetic Confinement: The basic principle of magnetic confinement is to hold plasma fuel in place with magnets and then heat it up using a combination of microwaves, radio waves, and particles beams. Researchers often do this in a tokamak, a donut-shaped reactor (the weird shape helps keep the plasma in place).

    ONE APPROACH: HOLD PLASMA FUEL WITH MAGNETS AND HEAT IT UP

    In the 1990s, the European tokamak JET achieved 16 million watts of fusion power for less than a second. On the whole, JET was able to produce 65 percent of the energy that went into the experiment.

    More recently, an international group is building the world's largest fusion reactor. This is an even bigger tokamak called ITER. The goal of ITER is to produce 500 million watts of power — in the range of a real power plant — for seconds at a time. The researchers also want to produce ten times more energy than is used by the system.

    Source : www.vox.com

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