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    mr. anderson is a very organized individual and has filled out and brought to you an enrollment form on october 10 for a new plan available january 1 next year. he is currently enrolled in original medicare. what should you do?

    James

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    get mr. anderson is a very organized individual and has filled out and brought to you an enrollment form on october 10 for a new plan available january 1 next year. he is currently enrolled in original medicare. what should you do? from EN Bilgi.

    AHIP TRAINING MODULE 5 Flashcards

    Start studying AHIP TRAINING MODULE 5. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    AHIP TRAINING MODULE 5

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    You are meeting with Mrs. BERLIN and she has completed an enrollment form for a MA-PD plan you represent. You notice that her handwriting is illegible and as a result, the spelling of her street looks incorrect. She asks you to fill in the corrected street name. What should you do?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    You MAY correct this information as long as you add your initials and date next to the correction.

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    BLOCK is currently enrolled in a MA plan that includes drug coverage. He found a stand-alone Medicare Rx plan in his area that offers better coverage than that available through his MA-PD plan and in addition has a low premium. It won't cost him much more and, because he has the means to do so, he wishes to enroll in the stand-alone Rx plan in addition to his MA-PD plan.

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    If Mr. Block enrolls in the stand-alone Medicare Rx plan, he will be dis-enrolled from the MA plan.

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    Terms in this set (35)

    You are meeting with Mrs. BERLIN and she has completed an enrollment form for a MA-PD plan you represent. You notice that her handwriting is illegible and as a result, the spelling of her street looks incorrect. She asks you to fill in the corrected street name. What should you do?

    You MAY correct this information as long as you add your initials and date next to the correction.

    BLOCK is currently enrolled in a MA plan that includes drug coverage. He found a stand-alone Medicare Rx plan in his area that offers better coverage than that available through his MA-PD plan and in addition has a low premium. It won't cost him much more and, because he has the means to do so, he wishes to enroll in the stand-alone Rx plan in addition to his MA-PD plan.

    If Mr. Block enrolls in the stand-alone Medicare Rx plan, he will be dis-enrolled from the MA plan.

    You are doing a sales presentation for Mrs. PECK. You know that the Medicare marketing guidelines prohibit certain types of statements. Apply those guidelines to the following statements and identify which would be prohibited.

    "If you're not in very good health, you will probably do better with a different product."

    PROHIBITED STATEMENT

    You have come to Mrs. BROWN's home for a sales presentation. At the beginning of the presentation, Mrs. Brown tells you that she has a copy of her medical record available because she thinks this will help you understand her needs. She suggests that you will know which questions to ask her about her health status in order to best assist her in selecting a plan.

    You can only ask Mrs. Brown questions about conditions that affect eligibility, specifically, whether she has end stage renal disease or one of the conditions that would qualify her for a special needs plan.

    GRANT has just entered his MA ICEP. What action could you help him take during this time?

    He will have one opportunity to enroll in a MA plan.

    KENNY is six months away from turning 65. She wants to know what she will have to do to enroll in a MA plan as soon as possible. What could you tell her?

    She may enroll in an MA plan beginning three months immediately before her first entitlement to both Medicare Part A and B.

    ZIEGLER is turning 65 next month and has asked you what he can do, and when he must do it, with respect to enrolling in Part D.

    He is currently in the Part D IEP and, during this time, he may make one Part D enrollment choice, including enrollment in a stand-alone Part D plan or a MA-PD plan.

    CLAGGETT is 66 years old. She has been covered under both Parts A and B of Original Medicare for the last six years due to her disability, has never been enrolled in a MA or Part D plan before. She wants to enroll in a Part D plan. She knows that there is such a thing as the Part D IEP and has concluded that, since she has never enrolled in such a plan before, she should be eligible to enroll under this period. What should you tell her about how the Part D IEP applies to her situation?

    It occurs three months before and three months after the month when a beneficiary meets the eligibility requirements for Part B, so she will NOT be able to use it as a justification for enrolling in a Part D plan now.

    FORD enrolled in a MA only plan in mid November. On December 1, he calls you up and says that he has changed his mind and would like to enroll into a MA-PD plan. What enrollment rules would apply in this case?

    He can make as many enrollment changes as he likes during the AEP and the last choice made prior to the end of the period will be the effective one as of January 1.

    ANDERSON is a very organized individual and has filled out and brought to you an enrollment form on October 10 for a new plan available January 1 next year. What should you do?

    Tell Mr. Anderson that you CAN'T accept any enrollment forms until the AEP begins.

    A client wants to give you an enrollment application prior to the beginning of the AEP because he is leaving on vacation for two weeks and does not want to forget about turning it in. What should you tell him?

    You must tell him you are NOT permitted to take the form. If he sends the form directly to the plan, the plan will process the enrollment on the day the AEP begins.

    Source : quizlet.com

    A Political History of Medicare and Prescription Drug Coverage

    This article examines the history of efforts to add prescription drug coverage to the Medicare program. It identifies several important patterns in policymaking over four decades. First, prescription drug coverage has usually been tied to the fate of ...

    Milbank Q. 2004 Jun; 82(2): 283–354.

    doi: 10.1111/j.0887-378X.2004.00311.x

    PMCID: PMC2690175 PMID: 15225331

    A Political History of Medicare and Prescription Drug Coverage

    Thomas R Oliver, Philip R Lee, and Helene L Lipton

    Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer

    This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

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    Abstract

    This article examines the history of efforts to add prescription drug coverage to the Medicare program. It identifies several important patterns in policymaking over four decades. First, prescription drug coverage has usually been tied to the fate of broader proposals for Medicare reform. Second, action has been hampered by divided government, federal budget deficits, and ideological conflict between those seeking to expand the traditional Medicare program and those preferring a greater role for private health care companies. Third, the provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 reflect earlier missed opportunities. Policymakers concluded from past episodes that participation in the new program should be voluntary, with Medicare beneficiaries and taxpayers sharing the costs. They ignored lessons from past episodes, however, about the need to match expanded benefits with adequate mechanisms for cost containment. Based on several new circumstances in 2003, the article demonstrates why there was a historic opportunity to add a Medicare prescription drug benefit and identify challenges to implementing an effective policy.

    On December 8, 2003, President George W. Bush (R) signed the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (P.L. 108–173), which authorizes Medicare coverage of outpatient prescription drugs as well as a host of other changes to the program. The new drug assistance represents a major new federal entitlement for Medicare beneficiaries, who now spend an average of $2,322 per year on prescription drugs (Kaiser Family Foundation 2003c). The drug assistance and other provisions of the law are projected to cost taxpayers at least $395 billion, and possibly as much as $534 billion, over the next decade (CBO 2004a, 13; CBO 2004b; Pear 2004a). Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.), one of the initiative's chief negotiators and political investors, hailed its passage: “Today is a historic day and a momentous day. Seniors have waited 38 years for this prescription drug benefit to be added to the Medicare program. Today they are just moments away from the drug coverage they desperately need and deserve” (Pear and Hulse 2003).

    In fact, for many Medicare beneficiaries, the benefits of the new law are not so immediate or valuable. By mid-2004, the federal government will authorize cards that can be used to obtain price discounts on prescription drug purchases and will offer a $600 credit to about 4.7 million low-income beneficiaries. In 2006 the full-fledged program is scheduled to begin. At that time, more than 40 million beneficiaries will have the following options: (1) they may keep any private prescription drug coverage they currently have; (2) they may enroll in a new, freestanding prescription drug plan; or (3) they may obtain drug coverage by enrolling in a Medicare managed care plan. Medicare will subsidize the cost of coverage for about 14 million low-income beneficiaries. Other beneficiaries will face significant gaps in coverage and, as a result, will still be liable for up to $3,600 or more in annual expenses.

    In the wake of this political breakthrough, public opinion on the final product was remarkably negative:

    After years of fierce campaigning, lobbying, and legislating over the issue, a landmark agreement finally emerged in Congress this week to provide Medicare prescription drug benefits. Among the key stakeholders in the legislation, there were definite winners and losers. But the group that should have come out on top—America's seniors—was reeling and confused at the prospect of limited help, while watching industry groups count their booty. In fact, members of Congress from both parties contended that some seniors struggling to pay for prescription drugs may actually end up worse off than they are now.

    (Serafini 2003)

    In a poll taken in the week that President Bush signed the new Medicare law, 47 percent of senior citizens opposed the changes, and only 26 percent voiced their approval. Among people of all ages who said they were closely following the Medicare debate, 56 percent said they disapproved of the legislation, and 39 percent supported it (ABC News/Washington Post Poll 2003). Their disappointment reflected high expectations as well as the upside-down politics that produced the new reforms:

    Even before Bush's ink on the bill was dry, the two political parties prepared to make the issue a focus of the 2004 elections. Bush, who defied conservatives in the Republican Party by backing a massive increase in a federal program long championed by Democrats, heralded the act as a strengthening of “compassionate government.” And Democrats, calling the legislation inadequate and harmful to many seniors, drafted substantially more generous prescription drug coverage and vowed to “take back our Medicare.”

    (Milbank and Deane 2003)

    When observers look back at 2003, they will wonder why it took 38 years to authorize Medicare coverage for such a critical component of modern medicine. Why did political leaders finally agree to address this gap in coverage at this time, and why was that agreement so fraught with controversy? Why did the new outpatient drug benefits under Medicare take the form they did? What issues remain for policymakers to confront in the future? This article attempts to answer each of these questions, as well as to provide a concise history and analysis of the role of prescription drugs in the evolution of Medicare policy. Our intent is to clarify both the contemporary debate over ways to “modernize” Medicare and the factors leading to or inhibiting changes in the program.

    Source : www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

    The Advocate

    The Advocate is a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) monthly newsmagazine. Established in 1967, it is the oldest continuing LGBT publication in the United States.

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    The Advocate

    14 Ağu 2001 96 sayfa 843-844. no.lar ISSN 0001-8996

    Yayınlayan: Here Publishing

    The Advocate is a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) monthly newsmagazine. Established in 1967, it is the oldest continuing LGBT publication in the United States.

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    1990 2000

    18 Oca 2000

    1 Şub 2000

    15 Şub 2000

    29 Şub 2000

    14 Mar 2000

    28 Mar 2000

    11 Nis 2000

    25 Nis 2000

    9 May 2000

    23 May 2000

    6 Haz 2000

    20 Haz 2000

    4 Tem 2000

    18 Tem 2000

    15 Ağu 2000

    29 Ağu 2000

    12 Eyl 2000

    26 Eyl 2000

    10 Eki 2000

    24 Eki 2000

    7 Kas 2000

    21 Kas 2000

    5 Ara 2000

    19 Ara 2000

    16 Oca 2001

    30 Oca 2001

    13 Şub 2001

    27 Şub 2001

    13 Mar 2001

    Source : books.google.com.tr

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