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    jack of all trades, master of none original quote

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    Jack of all trades, master of none

    Jack of all trades, master of none

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    For the Greek film, see Polytehnitis kai erimospitis.

    "Jack of all trades, master of none" is a figure of speech used in reference to a person who has dabbled in many skills, rather than gaining expertise by focusing on one.

    The original version "a jack of all trades" is often a compliment for a person who is good at fixing and has a very good broad knowledge. They may be a master of integration, as such an individual who knows enough from many learned trades and skills to be able to bring the individual's disciplines together in a practical manner. This person is a generalist rather than a specialist.

    Contents

    1 Origins 2 "Master of none" 3 “Full quotation” 4 See also 5 References 6 External links

    Origins[edit]

    Robert Greene used the phrase 'absolute Johannes Factotum' in his 1592 booklet [1] to dismissively refer to actor-turned-playwright William Shakespeare; this is the first published mention of Shakespeare. Some scholars believe Greene was referring to resolute Johannes Florio, known as John Florio. They have pointed out how 'Johannes' was the Latin name of John (Giovanni) and the name by which Florio was known among his contemporaries,[2] the term 'absolute' was an alliteration of the nickname chosen and used by Florio in his signature (precisely the word 'resolute') and the term 'factotum' was a disparaging definition of secretary, John Florio's job.[3][4]

    In 1612, the English-language version of the phrase appeared in the book "Essays and Characters of a Prison" by English writer Geffray Mynshul (Minshull),[5] originally published in 1618,[6] and probably based on the author's experience while held at Gray's Inn, London, when imprisoned for debt.

    "Master of none"[edit]

    The "master of none" element appears to have been added later;[7] it made the statement less flattering to the person receiving. Today, the phrase used in its entirety generally describes a person whose knowledge, while covering a number of areas, is superficial in all of them. When abbreviated as simply "jack of all trades", it is an ambiguous statement; the user's intention is then dependent on context. However, when "master of none" is added this is unflattering and sometimes added in jest.[8] In the United States and Canada, the phrase has been in use since 1721.[9][10]

    “Full quotation”[edit]

    In modern times, the phrase with the "master of none" element is sometimes expanded into a less unflattering couplet by adding a second line: "though oftentimes better than master of one" (or variants thereof), with some writers saying that such a couplet is the "original" version with the second line having been dropped, although there are no known instances of this second line dated to before the twenty-first century.[11][12][13][14][15]

    See also[edit]

    Amateur Competent man Multipotentiality Philomath Polymath

    References[edit]

    ^ "There is an upstart crow, beautified with our feathers, that with his tiger's heart wrapped in a player's hide supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you: and being an absolute Johannes Factotum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country."

    -- cited from Stephen Orgel and A. R. Braunmuller, editors, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 2002, p. xlvii.

    ^ "John or Giovanni Florio? Johannes Florius!". 26 January 2021.^ Gerevini, Saul (2008). . Pilgrim.^ Gerevini, Saul. "Shakespeare and Florio".^ "Geffray Minshull (Mynshul), English miscellaneous writer (1594? - 1668)". Giga-usa.com. Retrieved 2 April 2014.^ Minshull, Geffray (1821). . Retrieved 2 April 2014.^ "'Jack of all trades' – the meaning and origin of this phrase".^ , compiled by William and Mary Morris. HarperCollins, New York, 1977, 1988.^ "Random House Dictionary of Popular Proverbs and Sayings" by Gregory Y. Titelman (Random House, New York, 1996)^ The OED notes appearance in in August 1721 as "Jack of all Trades; and it would seem, Good at none."^ David Epistein (2020). "How Falling Behind Can Get You Ahead". Jack of all trades, master of none," the saying goes. But it is culturally telling that we have chopped off the ending: "…but oftentimes better than master of one.^ Haley Marie Craig, University of North Alabama (3 July 2020). "7 Phrases You've Been Misquoting". This saying got cut short as well and originally said: "A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one."^ Tabitha Wasserman (4 February 2019). "The complete saying was originally..." The complete saying was originally "A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one."^ Charlene Dargay (27 January 2017). "What is the origin of the phrase". The complete saying was originally "A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one."^ Martin, Gary. "'Jack of all trades' – the meaning and origin of this phrase". . Retrieved 24 November 2020.

    External links[edit]

    The dictionary definition of at Wiktionary

    Categories: English-language idiomsJack tales

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

    “The complete saying was originally “A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes…

    “The complete saying was originally “A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one.” Formerly intended as a compliment, the phrase means that a person is a…

    Tabitha Wasserman Feb 4, 2019 · 1 min read ·

    So, ignore the old “jack-of-all-trades, master of none” adage, and feel free to explore multiple fields of study.

    Learn to learn better: four ways to improve your retention

    11.1K 26 Aytekin Tank

    “The complete saying was originally “A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one.” Formerly intended as a compliment, the phrase means that a person is a generalist rather than a specialist, versatile and adept at many things.”

    This is the problem with our habit of shortening things. We don’t understand their original intention anymore. We shouldn’t ignore the old adage but the new one (in this case, at least).

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    Source : medium.com

    What is the origin of the phrase 'Jack of All Trades Master of None' and what does it mean?

    Answer (1 of 23): The complete saying was originally “A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one.” Formerly intended as a compliment, the phrase means that a person is a generalist rather than a specialist, versatile and adept at many things. In current ...

    What is the origin of the phrase "Jack of All Trades Master of None" and what does it mean?

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    23 Answers Charlene Dargay

    , speechwriter, reader of books

    Answered 5 years ago · Author has 1.6K answers and 7.5M answer views

    The complete saying was originally “A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one.” Formerly intended as a compliment, the phrase means that a person is a generalist rather than a specialist, versatile and adept at many things.

    In current usage, however, the phrase is usually meant sarcastically and most decidedly not a compliment. Calling someone a “jack of all trades” implies that a person isn't very skillful in any of the areas in which he claims expertise. His knowledge or skills are superficial rather than comprehensive. He just dabbles, especially in

    Related questions More answers below

    Is the phrase "Jack of all trades, master of none" true?

    Which is better, to be a jack of all trades or master of one?

    Is “Jack of all trades, master of none” really just a part of a longer proverb?

    Who is the Jack as in "Jack of all trades, master of none"?

    To what extent should someone consider the quote “Jack of all trades, master of none; better than a master of one” in their life?

    Daniel Walker

    , Computer programmer, horse owner, bow-shooter/archer.

    Answered 8 years ago · Author has 1.7K answers and 5.2M answer views

    The first written record of the first part of it, is by an author, Geoffrey Minshull, in a 17th century book about his time spent in a debtors' prison, and the colourful characters he meet there. Jack was a common name meaning simply 'man' (hence, steeplejack, lumberjack et cetera).

    Unlike these - his house-scaling or wood-hewing compatriots - however, a Jack of all trades was not a specialist in any discipline, but dabbled in every thing. The extended version of the phrase, which you cite, implies that you will only get the best job from someone who has studied his trade as a vocation.

    41.8K viewsView upvotes

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    Wei Shen

    , Image Consultant at Wei Consulting (2014-present)

    Answered 2 years ago · Author has 8.7K answers and 7.1M answer views

    It means you know a lot in many topics but you are not specialist about Or you have the skills to be a general contractor but you do not have the skills to be the master electrician or plumber.

    Sometimes this is a compliment or an insult.

    From google:

    The complete saying was originally “A jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one.” Formerly intended as a compliment, the phrase means that a person is a generalist rather than a specialist, versatile and adept at many things.

    9.7K viewsView upvotes

    Curt Weinstein

    , Design and Make WEST Monofilament Esthesiometers

    Updated 3 years ago · Author has 26K answers and 10.6M answer views

    A master of a trade was trained by a master for a long time. A Jack of all trades was someone who knew much about how to do things, but had not mastered any one trade. Masters charged a lot of money. Jacks charged much less. The masters wanted you to know that the Jacks hadn’t mastered their trade.

    Story: I know how to install an electrical outlet. So when my wife wanted an outlet near some switch, I assured her that I could do it — no problem. Then I took the electrical plate off the switch, and I saw the mess of wires all hooked up to the switch. I immediately changed my mind. I closed up sho

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    What is the meaning behind " A jack of all trades is a master of none"?

    If you are a jack of all trades but a master of none, is that supposed to be a bad thing?

    Does "jack of all trades" necessarily mean master of none?

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    How did the phrase, "Jack of all trades" originate?

    Jonathan Lovell

    , Professor of English at San Jose State University (1999-present)

    Answered 3 years ago · Author has 159 answers and 118K answer views

    The phase dates from the 14th c, when the name “Jack” was commonly used as a reference to every man. Like the way “Joe” is used today, as in “Oh he’s just an average Joe.”

    And that last sentence is pretty much how the phrase as a whole is understood today. It’s a reference to a person, male or female, who is passably adept at doing many things, not exclusively “trades,” but not particularly adept at any of them.

    Having just concluded listening to Jonathan Weiner’s The Beak of the Finch, bringing Darwin’s theory of evolution into the modern day, I’d argue that what makes humans unique as a specie

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    David Austin

    , I Am a Solicitor, a Lawyer. (1965-present)

    Answered 3 years ago · Author has 1.9K answers and 707.5K answer views

    the original phrase is “Jack of all trades”. That means someone who can turn his hand to anything in the trades line, so he could do a bit of carpentry, a bit of mechanics work, a bit of metalwork, fiddle with electrical stuff, dig a hole, work a plot of land, put a new pane in a window etc. Most Farmers are really Jacks of all trades. They have to be able to keep a wide variety of resources and assets operating.

    Source : www.quora.com

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