if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    in what u.s. state would you find the resort area of lowell point, were geologists were called to assess ground stability after a landslide buried part of a road?

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get in what u.s. state would you find the resort area of lowell point, were geologists were called to assess ground stability after a landslide buried part of a road? from EN Bilgi.

    Landslide buries primary road connecting Alaska resort community to city of Seward

    An area outside the Lowell Point community near Seward, Alaska, was still unstable Sunday, following a Saturday landslide.

    ABC7 Los Angeles | Eyewitness News

    WATCH NOW WATCH LOG IN 85° U.S. & WORLD

    Landslide buries primary road connecting Alaska resort community to nearby city

    Many people are taking water taxis or their own boats to get to the other side of the slide.

    CNNWire

    Monday, May 9, 2022 9:35PM

    SHARE TWEET EMAIL EMBED <>MORE VIDEOS

    An area outside the Lowell Point community near Seward, Alaska, was still unstable Sunday, following a Saturday landslide which blocked access to the primary road connecting the resort area and the city of Seward.

    SEWARD, Ak. -- An area outside the Lowell Point community near Seward, Alaska, was still unstable Sunday, following a Saturday landslide which blocked access to the primary road connecting the resort area and the city of Seward.

    Brenda Ballou, a spokesperson for the city, told CNN a few hundred people live in Lowell Point, an unincorporated, heavily-visited tourist area on the Kenai Peninsula south of Anchorage.

    Marissa Beck, who owns a rental property in Seward, told CNN there are many cabins and rental houses in the area, and guests are now stuck in town or cannot get to their rentals. Many people are taking water taxis or their own boats to get to the other side of the slide.

    No one was hurt when the slide occurred, Seward City Manager Janette Bower said in a Facebook post Saturday, and Ballou confirmed.

    Nathaniel Caole was headed to walk his dogs on Saturday evening when he noticed a commotion on Lowell Road and pulled off to the side of the road to see what was happening. He noticed a boulder was blocking a part of the road, and cops were stopping traffic from passing by.

    "Rocks would fall continuously and once in a while some bigger rubble would come down, but there were no signs that the slide was going to be that extensive." Caole said.

    "When the slide first started I noticed the first tree came down and then quickly after that I could see all the trees upwards falling in unison," Caole said.

    The slide is about 300 feet wide, CNN affiliate KTUU reported, citing Ballou.

    It's unclear what triggered the landslide, but Lowell Road frequently has falling rocks and avalanches, according to Beck.

    Last month, an avalanche 60 to 80 feet deep and 300 to 400 feet wide cut off nearly 100 houses in Anchorage, about 2.5 hours north of Seward.

    A local company is mobilizing to begin recovery efforts once geologists deem the area to be stable. The state is sending geologists with drone equipment to assist in assessment efforts, Ballou said.

    According to Ballou, no utility functions were damaged in the landslide and communication remains open with Lowell Point.

    CNN has reached out to the Seward police and fire departments for more information.

    Report a correction or typo

    RELATED TOPICS:

    alaskalandslidecaught on tapenationalcaught on videou.s. & worldcaught on camera

    SHARE TWEET EMAIL MORE VIDEOS

    From CNN Newsource affiliates

    TOP STORIES

    Newsom announces record-setting $97.5 billion budget surplus

    Updated an hour ago

    New study may have identified cause of sudden infant death syndrome

    Panel unanimously rejects desalination plant in Huntington Beach

    Updated an hour ago

    Fred Ward, 'The Right Stuff' and 'Short Cuts' actor, dies at 79

    SF woman choked unconscious in attack, saved by neighbors

    Updated 2 hours ago

    Video: Tesla jumps curb and crashes straight into convention center

    Updated an hour ago

    Hundreds of Laguna Niguel residents remain evacuated after brush fire

    SHOW MORE

    Couple longing for grandchild sues son, his wife

    Updated 2 hours ago

    Inflation triggers California minimum wage increase in 2023

    Settlement: LA to spend up to $3 billion on beds, units for homeless

    Updated an hour ago

    San Bernardino County Fire introduces newest K-9 arson investigator

    Updated 2 hours ago

    LASD cover-up allegations: New claim says sheriff misled public

    Updated 2 hours ago

    MORE TOP STORIES NEWS

    Source : abc7.com

    Seward, Alaska: Landslide buries primary road connecting Lowell Point community to city

    An area outside the Lowell Point community near Seward, Alaska, was still unstable Sunday, following a Saturday landslide which blocked access to the primary road connecting the resort area and the city of Seward.

    Landslide buries primary road connecting Alaska resort community to city of Seward

    By Hannah Sarisohn and Sara Smart, CNN

    Updated 0605 GMT (1405 HKT) May 9, 2022

    Bystander video captures the moment a landslide occurs in Alaska 01:11

    (CNN)An area outside the Lowell Point community near Seward, Alaska, was still unstable Sunday, following a Saturday landslide which blocked access to the primary road connecting the resort area and the city of Seward.

    Brenda Ballou, a spokesperson for the city, told CNN a few hundred people live in Lowell Point, an unincorporated, heavily-visited tourist area on the Kenai Peninsula south of Anchorage.

    Marissa Beck, who owns a rental property in Seward, told CNN there are many cabins and rental houses in the area, and guests are now stuck in town or cannot get to their rentals. Many people are taking water taxis or their own boats to get to the other side of the slide.

    No one was hurt when the slide occurred, Seward City Manager Janette Bower said in a Facebook post Saturday, and Ballou confirmed.

    Nathaniel Caole was headed to walk his dogs on Saturday evening when he noticed a commotion on Lowell Road and pulled off to the side of the road to see what was happening. He noticed a boulder was blocking a part of the road, and cops were stopping traffic from passing by.

    "Rocks would fall continuously and once in a while some bigger rubble would come down, but there were no signs that the slide was going to be that extensive." Caole said.

    "When the slide first started I noticed the first tree came down and then quickly after that I could see all the trees upwards falling in unison," Caole said.

    close dialog

    The slide is about 300 feet wide, CNN affiliate KTUU reported, citing Ballou.

    It's unclear what triggered the landslide, but Lowell Road frequently has falling rocks and avalanches, according to Beck.

    Last month, an avalanche 60 to 80 feet deep and 300 to 400 feet wide cut off nearly 100 houses in Anchorage, about 2.5 hours north of Seward.

    A local company is mobilizing to begin recovery efforts once geologists deem the area to be stable. The state is sending geologists with drone equipment to assist in assessment efforts, Ballou said.

    According to Ballou, no utility functions were damaged in the landslide and communication remains open with Lowell Point.

    CNN has reached out to the Seward police and fire departments for more information.

    CNN's Theresa Waldrop contributed to this report.

    PAID CONTENT

    Source : edition.cnn.com

    Crews begin clearing huge landslide that covered road in Seward

    May 10—Workers have started to clear a vast landslide that severed the community of Lowell Point, outside Seward, from its only road access Saturday. But officials have warned it could be up to two weeks before the road is fully usable again. The access road to Lowell Point has seen smaller avalanches and landslides from the steep slopes of Bear Mountain. But on Saturday at about 7:30 p.m. a ...

    Anchorage Daily News, Alaska

    Crews begin clearing huge landslide that covered road in Seward

    Michelle Theriault Boots, Anchorage Daily News, Alaska

    Tue, May 10, 2022, 4:48 PM·3 min read

    May 10—Workers have started to clear a vast landslide that severed the community of Lowell Point, outside Seward, from its only road access Saturday. But officials have warned it could be up to two weeks before the road is fully usable again.

    The access road to Lowell Point has seen smaller avalanches and landslides from the steep slopes of Bear Mountain. But on Saturday at about 7:30 p.m. a tumble of dirt and trees an estimated 200 feet long and 300 feet wide came down, burying the narrow road.

    "The mountain just shed," said City Clerk Brenda Ballou said.

    No injuries were reported, and no problems related to the large debris field that spilled into Resurrection Bay have been recorded, Ballou said Monday. The city set up a shelter but no one had needed it as of Monday, she said.

    On Monday, contractors used excavators to begin the process of hauling away the dirt. The debris field is estimated at 40,000 cubic yards, Ballou said.

    The 200 or more people who live in Lowell Point or were visiting campgrounds and rental homes in the area have been using water taxis to get to the Seward harbor, Ballou said.

    Miller's Landing, a water taxi, camping and sea kayaking business in Lowell Point, has shuttled more than 160 people to and from Lowell Point since the slide, for free or at low cost, said Tom Miller, one of the company's owners. Boats were running every two hours Monday, Miller said.

    The road has been blocked before, but "not like this. Not for days," Miller said.

    Still, people have been "resilient and accommodating," he said. Power and phone lines buried under the road were not knocked out by the landslide, so homes there have electricity, he said.

    A community conversation about the viability of the road has been happening for years, but this may bring a new urgency, said Miller.

    "We've explored it before, but it seems to get batted back and forth a lot with the ownership of the road."

    Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting

    Recommended Stories

    CBS-Losangeles

    OC Fire Authority official says climate change partly to blame

    Chief Brian Fennessy with the Orange County Fire Authority said, "These are not Santa Ana winds. These are coastal winds that we experience, generally, every day. The big difference, and we're seeing it again, is with the climate change. The fuel beds in this county , throughout Southern California and throughout the west, are so dry that fire like this is going to be more commonplace.

    Associated Press

    No sea serpents, mobsters but Tahoe trash divers strike gold

    They found no trace of a mythical sea monster, no sign of mobsters in cement shoes or long-lost treasure chests. The dozens of dives that concluded this week were part of a first-of-its-kind effort to learn more about the source and potential harm caused by plastics and other pollutants in the storied alpine lake on the California-Nevada line. It's also taken organizers on a journey through the history, folklore and development of the lake atop the Sierra Nevada that holds enough water to cover all of California 14 inches (36 centimeters) deep.

    Ad • Babbel.com

    Ad

    Start speaking A Language in 3 Weeks

    Language Learning Advice From An Expert

    Charlotte Observer

    NASCAR driver saves Doc the elk, who was causing a ruckus at Grandfather Mountain

    Doc was the dominant of three elks at the park run by the Grandfather Mountain Stewardship Foundation.

    Source : news.yahoo.com

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 14 day ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer