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    immediately after the attacks of september 11, 2001, many people around the world felt uncomfortable voicing support for the united states. were shocked by the events and condemned the attacks. declared war on al-qaeda and other terrorist organizations. remained silent to avoid attacks by al-qaeda on their soil.

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    get immediately after the attacks of september 11, 2001, many people around the world felt uncomfortable voicing support for the united states. were shocked by the events and condemned the attacks. declared war on al-qaeda and other terrorist organizations. remained silent to avoid attacks by al-qaeda on their soil. from EN Bilgi.

    Securing our Future: A Decade of Counter

    Terrorism did not begin on 11 September 2001, but that terrible day did change the world. The attacks on the United States that claimed the lives of nearly three thousand innocent people showed us that terrorism had morphed into a global phenomenon that could cause massive pain and destruction anywhere. The magnitude of the attacks meant that no one could stand on the sidelines anymore. The fight had become global because the impact of terrorism was being felt everywhere.

    Securing our Future: A Decade of Counter-terrorism Strategies

    Securing our Future: A Decade of Counter-terrorism Strategies About the author

    Mike Smith

    Mike Smith is Assistant Secretary-General of the United Nations and Executive Director of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate.

    Terrorism did not begin on 11 September 2001, but that terrible day did change the world. The attacks on the United States that claimed the lives of nearly three thousand innocent people showed us that terrorism had morphed into a global phenomenon that could cause massive pain and destruction anywhere. The magnitude of the attacks meant that no one could stand on the sidelines anymore. The fight had become global because the impact of terrorism was being felt everywhere.

    The human values we share and work to uphold are derided by terrorists. The promotion of peace, equality, tolerance, and dignity for all are universal values that transcend our national differences. They are the glue that binds us together. United as nations and people of the world, we must come together to protect our common humanity.

    The global framework against terrorism

    The United Nations was engaged with the issue of terrorism long before that calamitous September morning ten years ago. For decades, the Organization has brought the international community together to condemn terrorist acts and developed the international legal framework to enable states to fight the threat collectively. Sixteen international treaties have been negotiated at the United Nations and related forums that address issues as diverse as the hijacking of planes, the taking of hostages, the financing of terrorism, the marking of explosives, and the threat of nuclear terrorism.

    Additionally, in response to deadly attacks in East Africa and the deteriorating situation in Afghanistan, the Security Council, in 1999, decided to impose sanctions on the Taliban and, later, on Al-Qaeda. The Council created a list of individuals and entities associated with these organizations that are subject to a travel ban, assets freeze, and arms embargo.

    Shortly after 11 September 2001, the Security Council took even more forthright action, based on its realization that terrorism would continue to pose a serious threat to international peace and security in the new millennium. It adopted a far-reaching resolution charting the way forward in the fight against terrorism. That resolution requires all UN Member States, separately and collectively, to deny terrorists safe haven and financial support and to cooperate in bringing them to justice.

    Subsequent Security Council resolutions paid increasing attention to taking preventive measures noting, for example, that extremists were using the Internet to recruit people and incite terrorist acts. The Council began to consistently emphasize the need for counter-terrorism measures to be in line with states' international legal obligations, including human rights law. It also considered it vital to ensure that non-state actors, such as terrorist groups, would not have access to weapons of mass destruction. Meanwhile, in 2006, the General Assembly adopted the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, in which it stressed the importance of addressing the issues that can give rise to terrorism. These include unresolved conflicts, dehumanization of victims, discrimination, violations of human rights, and lack of good governance.

    A comprehensive response to terrorism

    In the past decade, we at the United Nations have built on previous experience and are helping states adapt to an evolving threat that often involves new technologies. Although I believe we are heading in the right direction, much progress still needs to be made at the national, regional, and international levels.

    Individual countries have made big strides, but success is measured in relative terms and major disparities persist. While some countries can spend billions of dollars on countering terrorism, others struggle to put in place even the basic measures needed to protect their borders and bring terrorists to justice. When a large proportion of a country's population lives in poverty, it is no surprise that they put scarce resources into development rather than counter-terrorism. We understand that, and often suggest approaches that have the dual benefit of protecting the country's economic and developmental interests while enhancing its security.

    Frankly, preventing terrorist attacks is a challenge for everyone, even for countries that are richly endowed with resources and skilled personnel. For most nations, realistically, the implementation of the long list of measures envisaged by the Security Council resolutions and the Global Strategy is going to be patchy at best. The task is daunting: securing borders, tightening financial controls, strengthening the role of the police, improving criminal justice systems, and providing mutual legal assistance to other countries trying to convict terrorists in their courts. This is a step-by-step process that might begin with Governments ratifying the relevant conventions and adopting stronger terrorism-related laws. However, they cannot stop there.

    The devil is often in the details when dealing with an issue as complex as this one. Take, for example, airport security. In many airports, security is tighter than ever, often to the annoyance of travelers who feel they are subjected to overly intrusive measures. The 9/11 terrorists, the "shoe bomber," and the "underwear bomber" all prompted reviews of security procedures that resulted in new approaches. As we introduce the latest ones and train staff on their use, we must always be aware that Al-Qaeda and other groups are probably working on new methods of evasion. All this relies on information and technology, both often in short supply in parts of the world where it can take weeks to repair a broken X-ray machine.

    Source : www.un.org

    TORA BORA REVISITED: HOW WE FAILED TO GET BIN LADEN AND WHY IT MATTERS TODAY

    [Senate Prints 111-35]

    [From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]

    111th Congress S. Prt.

    1st Session COMMITTEE PRINT 111-35

    _______________________________________________________________________

    TORA BORA REVISITED:

    HOW WE FAILED TO GET BIN LADEN

    AND WHY IT MATTERS TODAY

    __________ A Report To Members OF THE

    COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

    UNITED STATES SENATE

    John F. Kerry, Chairman

    One Hundred Eleventh Congress

    First Session November 30, 2009

    [GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

    ----------

    U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

    53-709 PDF WASHINGTON : 2009

    For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing

    Office Internet: bookstore.gpo.gov Phone: toll free (866) 512-1800;

    DC area (202) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2250 Mail: Stop SSOP,

    Washington, DC 20402-0001

    COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

    JOHN F. KERRY, Massachusetts, Chairman

    CHRISTOPHER J. DODD, Connecticut RICHARD G. LUGAR, Indiana

    RUSSELL D. FEINGOLD, Wisconsin BOB CORKER, Tennessee

    BARBARA BOXER, California JOHNNY ISAKSON, Georgia

    ROBERT MENENDEZ, New Jersey JAMES E. RISCH, Idaho

    BENJAMIN L. CARDIN, Maryland JIM DeMINT, South Carolina

    ROBERT P. CASEY, Jr., Pennsylvania JOHN BARRASSO, Wyoming

    JIM WEBB, Virginia ROGER F. WICKER, Mississippi

    JEANNE SHAHEEN, New Hampshire JAMES M. INHOFE, Oklahoma

    EDWARD E. KAUFMAN, Delaware

    KIRSTEN E. GILLIBRAND, New York

    David McKean, Staff Director

    Kenneth A. Myers, Jr., Republican Staff Director

    (ii) C O N T E N T S ---------- Page

    Letter of Transmittal.......................................... v

    Executive Summary.............................................. 1

    1. Flight to Tora Bora......................................... 3

    The Sheikh Arrives........................................... 5

    Other Voices, Same Conclusion................................ 7

    ``A Controversial Fight''.................................... 9

    2. The Afghan Model: A Flawed Masterpiece or Just Flawed?...... 10

    A Shift in Attention and Resources........................... 12

    ``We're Going to Lose Our Prey''............................. 13

    Flight from Tora Bora........................................ 13

    3. An Alternative Plan......................................... 15

    Troops Were Ready to Go...................................... 17

    The Price of Failure......................................... 19

    Endnotes....................................................... 21

    Appendixes

    Appendix I.--``A Flawed Masterpiece,'' Michael E. O'Hanlon,

    Foreign Affairs, March/April 2002.............................. 25

    Appendix II.--United States Special Operations Command History,

    6th Edition.................................................... 33

    (iii)

    LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

    ----------

    United States Senate,

    Committee on Foreign Relations,

    Washington, DC, November 30, 2009.

    Dear Colleague: This report by the committee majority staff

    is part of our continuing examination of the conflict in

    Afghanistan. When we went to war less than a month after the

    attacks of September 11, the objective was to destroy Al Qaeda

    and kill or capture its leader, Osama bin Laden, and other

    senior figures in the terrorist group and the Taliban, which

    had hosted them. Today, more than eight years later, we find

    ourselves fighting an increasingly lethal insurgency in

    Afghanistan and neighboring Pakistan that is led by many of

    those same extremists. Our inability to finish the job in late

    2001 has contributed to a conflict today that endangers not

    just our troops and those of our allies, but the stability of a

    volatile and vital region. This report relies on new and

    existing information to explore the consequences of the failure

    to eliminate bin Laden and other extremist leaders in the hope

    that we can learn from the mistakes of the past.

    Sincerely, John F. Kerry, Chairman.

    TORA BORA REVISITED:

    HOW WE FAILED TO GET BIN LADEN

    AND WHY IT MATTERS TODAY

    ---------- Executive Summary

    On October 7, 2001, U.S. aircraft began bombing the

    training bases and strongholds of Al Qaeda and the ruling

    Taliban across Afghanistan. The leaders who sent murderers to

    attack the World Trade Center and the Pentagon less than a

    month earlier and the rogue government that provided them

    sanctuary were running for their lives. President George W.

    Bush's expression of America's desire to get Osama bin Laden

    ``dead or alive'' seemed about to come true.

    Two months later, American civilian and military leaders

    celebrated what they viewed as a lasting victory with the

    selection of Hamid Karzai as the country's new hand-picked

    leader. The war had been conceived as a swift campaign with a

    single objective: defeat the Taliban and destroy Al Qaeda by

    capturing or killing bin Laden and other key leaders. A unique

    Source : www.govinfo.gov

    The Global War on Terrorism: The First 100 Days

    The Global War on Terrorism: The First 100 Days

    "We are supported by the collective will of the world."

    --President George W. Bush

    The Coalition Information Centers

    Washington, U.S.A London, U.K. Islamabad, Pakistan Executive Summary

    "The attack took place on American soil, but it was an attack on the heart and soul of the civilized world. And the world has come together to fight a new and different war, the first, and we hope the only one, of the 21st century. A war against all those who seek to export terror, and a war against those governments that support or shelter them."

    On September 11, terrorists attacked freedom.

    The world has responded with an unprecedented coalition against international terrorism. In the first 100 days of the war, President George W. Bush increased America’s homeland security and built a worldwide coalition that:

    Began to destroy al-Qaeda’s grip on Afghanistan by driving the Taliban from power.

    Disrupted al-Qaeda’s global operations and terrorist financing networks.

    Destroyed al-Qaeda terrorist training camps.

    Helped the innocent people of Afghanistan recover from the Taliban’s reign of terror.

    Helped Afghans put aside long-standing differences to form a new interim government that represents all Afghans – including women.

    President Bush is implementing a comprehensive and visionary foreign policy against international terrorism. The President’s policy puts the world on notice that any nation that harbors or supports terrorism will be regarded as a hostile regime.

    Diplomacy. President Bush has built a worldwide coalition against terrorism. More than 80 countries suffered losses on September 11; 136 countries have offered a diverse range of military assistance; 46 multilateral organizations have declared their support; and with U.S. leadership and international support, Afghans are putting aside long-standing ethnic and political differences to form a new and representative government.Terrorist Finances. The President fired the first shot in the war on terrorism with the stroke of his pen to seize terrorist financial assets and disrupt their fundraising pipelines. The world financial community is moving to starve the terrorists of their financial support. 196 countries support the financial war on terror; 142 countries have acted to freeze terrorist assets; in the U.S. alone, the assets of 153 known terrorists, terrorist organizations, and terrorist financial centers have been frozen; and major terrorist financial networks have been closed down.The Military Campaign. Operation began on October 7, 2001, and enjoys the support of countries from the United Kingdom to Australia to Japan. The Taliban have been forced to surrender major cities. The military has destroyed 11 terrorist training camps and 39 Taliban command and control sites. And al-Qaeda terrorists have been captured, killed or are on the run.Law Enforcement. The U.S. has led a global dragnet to help bring terrorists to justice and help prevent future terrorist acts, creating the Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force to prevent terrorists from entering the U.S.; arresting and indicting known terrorists; increasing the global sharing of law enforcement information; and implementing tough new anti-terrorism laws.Humanitarian. As Afghanistan’s largest humanitarian donor, the U.S. has increased its aid to the Afghan people by providing $187 million in aid since October alone, including food, shelter, blankets, and medical supplies. The President also launched the America’s Fund for Afghan Children that has already raised more than $1.5 million for the children of Afghanistan. As the harsh Afghan winter approaches, the U.S. commitment to the Afghan people is saving lives.Homeland Security. President Bush has taken steps to help protect America against further terrorist attacks, providing $20 billion for homeland security; strengthening intelligence efforts; creating the Office of Homeland Security and the Homeland Security Council; implementing tough new airline security measures; and taking steps to protect America’s mail.Helping the Survivors of September 11. The American people have responded with overwhelming compassion for the families of the victims of September 11, donating at least $1.3 billion to charities.Respecting Islam. Almost immediately after the attacks the President took steps to protect Muslim-Americans from hate crimes. The President also held a series of events, including hosting the first-ever White House Iftar and an Eid event at the end of Ramadan; the President visited the Islamic Center; and the President created the "Friendship Through Education" initiative to bring American and Muslim children closer together.

    The Tragedy of September 11

    "Every one of the victims who died on September 11th was the most important person on earth to somebody."

    On September 11 the terrorists committed an act of war against the innocent. The terrorists killed not only to end lives -- they killed to end our way of life. Recently the terrorists said that we should forget the attacks of September 11. The terrorists would like nothing more than to silence the world’s vocal opposition to their frightening vision they hope to export to every corner of the world.

    Source : 2001-2009.state.gov

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