if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    if you think you may have an sti and would like to get more information, where can you learn more about stis? name at least three resources.

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get if you think you may have an sti and would like to get more information, where can you learn more about stis? name at least three resources. from EN Bilgi.

    Adolescents and STDs

    CDC Fact Sheet: Information for Teens: Staying Healthy and Preventing STDs

    CDC Fact Sheet: Information for Teens and Young Adults: Staying Healthy and Preventing STDs

    Español (Spanish)

    Basic Fact Sheet

    Basic fact sheets answer general questions about STDs.

    You can add this content to your website by  syndicating.

    What are sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)?

    STDs are diseases that are passed from one person to another through sexual contact. These include chlamydia, gonorrhea, genital herpes, human papillomavirus (HPV), syphilis, and HIV. Many of these STDs do not show symptoms for a long time. Even without symptoms, they can still be harmful and passed on during sex.

    How are STDs spread?

    You can get an STD by having vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who has an STD. Anyone who is sexually active can get an STD. You don’t even have to “go all the way” (have anal or vaginal sex) to get an STD. This is because some STDs, like herpes and HPV, are spread by skin-to-skin contact.

    How common are STDs?

    STDs are common, especially among young people. There were 26 million new sexually transmitted infections in 2018 in the United States. About half of these infections are in people between the ages of 15 and 24. Young people are at greater risk of getting an STD for several reasons:

    Young women’s bodies are biologically more prone to STDs.

    Some young people do not get the recommended STD tests.

    Many young people are hesitant to talk openly and honestly with a doctor or nurse about their sex lives.

    Not having insurance or transportation can make it more difficult for young people to access STD testing.

    Some young people have more than one sex partner.

    What can I do to protect myself?

    The surest way to protect yourself against STDs is to not have sex. That means not having any vaginal, anal, or oral sex (“abstinence”). There are many things to consider before having sex

    external icon

    . It’s okay to say “no” if you don’t want to have sex.

    If you do decide to have sex, you and your partner should get tested for STDs beforehand. Make sure that you and your partner use a condom from start to finish every time you have oral, anal, or vaginal sex. Know where to get condoms and how to use them correctly. It is not safe to stop using condoms unless you’ve both been tested for STDs, know your results, and are in a mutually monogamous relationship.

    Mutual monogamy means that you and your partner both agree to only have sexual contact with each other. This can help protect against STDs, as long as you’ve both been tested and know you’re STD-free.

    Before you have sex, talk with your partner about how you will prevent STDs and pregnancy. If you think you’re ready to have sex, you need to be ready to protect your body. You should also talk to your partner ahead of time about what you will and will not do sexually. Your partner should always respect your right to say no to anything that doesn’t feel right.

    Make sure you get the health care you need. Ask a doctor or nurse about STD testing and about vaccines against HPV and hepatitis B.

    Girls and young women may have extra needs to protect their reproductive health. Talk to your doctor or nurse about regular cervical cancer screening, and chlamydia and gonorrhea testing. You may also want to discuss unintended pregnancy and birth control.

    Avoid mixing alcohol and/or recreational drugs with sex. If you use alcohol and drugs, you are more likely to take risks, like not using a condom or having sex with someone you normally wouldn’t have sex with.

    If I get an STD, how will I know?

    Many STDs don’t cause any symptoms that you would notice. The only way to know for sure if you have an STD is to get tested. You can get an STD from having sex with someone who has no symptoms. Just like you, that person might not even know he or she has an STD.

    Where can I get tested?

    There are places that offer teen-friendly, confidential, and free STD tests. This means that no one has to find out you’ve been tested. Visit GetTested to find an STD testing location near you.

    Can STDs be treated?

    Your doctor can prescribe medicine to cure some STDs, like chlamydia and gonorrhea. Other STDs, like herpes, can’t be cured, but you can take medicine to help with the symptoms.

    If you are ever treated for an STD, be sure to finish all of your medicine, even if you feel better before you finish it all. Ask the doctor or nurse about testing and treatment for your partner, too. You and your partner should avoid having sex until you’ve both been treated. Otherwise, you may continue to pass the STD back and forth. It is possible to get an STD again (after you’ve been treated), if you have sex with someone who has an STD.

    What happens if I don’t treat an STD?

    Some curable STDs can be dangerous if they aren’t treated. For example, if left untreated, chlamydia and gonorrhea can make it difficult—or even impossible—for a woman to get pregnant. You also increase your chances of getting HIV if you have an untreated STD. Some STDs, like HIV, can be fatal if left untreated.

    Source : www.cdc.gov

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)

    WHO fact sheet on sexually transmitted diseases (STIs), providing key facts, as a public health issue, infections and transmissions, STIs and women's health, adverse outcomes of pregnancy, HIV, STI syndromes, prevention, vaccination, mother-to-child transmission, WHO response.

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)

    22 November 2021 العربية 中文 Français Русский Español

    Key facts

    More than 1 million sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are acquired every day worldwide, the majority of which are asymptomatic.

    Each year there are an estimated 374 million new infections with 1 of 4 STIs: chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and trichomoniasis.

    More than 500 million people aged 15 to 49 years are estimated to have a genital infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) (1).

    HPV infection is associated with 570 000 cases of cervical cancer in 2018, and over 311 000 cervical cancer deaths each year (2).

    Almost 1 million pregnant women were estimated to be infected with syphilis in 2016, resulting in over 350 000 adverse birth outcomes including 200 000 stillbirths and newborn deaths (3).

    STIs have direct impact on sexual and reproductive health through stigmatization, infertility, cancers and pregnancy complications and can increase the risk of HIV.

    Drug resistance, especially for gonorrhoea, is a major threat to reducing the burden of STIs worldwide.

    Overview

    More than 30 different bacteria, viruses and parasites are known to be transmitted through sexual contact. Eight of these pathogens are linked to the greatest incidence of sexually transmitted disease. Of these, 4 are currently curable: syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis. The other 4 are viral infections which are incurable: hepatitis B, herpes simplex virus (HSV or herpes), HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV).

    STIs are spread predominantly by sexual contact, including vaginal, anal and oral sex. Some STIs can also be transmitted from mother-to-child during pregnancy, childbirth and breastfeeding.

    A person can have an STI without showing symptoms of disease. Common symptoms of STIs include vaginal discharge, urethral discharge or burning in men, genital ulcers and abdominal pain.

    Scope of the problem

    STIs have a profound impact on sexual and reproductive health worldwide.

    More than 1 million STIs are acquired every day. In 2020, WHO estimated 374 million new infections with one of four STIs: chlamydia (129 million), gonorrhoea (82 million), syphilis (7.1 million) and trichomoniasis (156 million). More than 490 million people were estimated to be living with genital HSV (herpes) infection in 2016, and an estimated 300 million women have an HPV infection, the primary cause of cervical cancer. An estimated 296 million people are living with chronic hepatitis B globally. Both HPV and hepatitis B infections are preventable with vaccination.

    STIs can have serious consequences beyond the immediate impact of the infection itself.

    STIs like herpes, gonorrhoea and syphilis can increase the risk of HIV acquisition.

    Mother-to-child transmission of STIs can result in stillbirth, neonatal death, low-birth weight and prematurity, sepsis, pneumonia, neonatal conjunctivitis and congenital deformities. Approximately 1 million pregnant women were estimated to have active syphilis in 2016, resulting in over 350 000 adverse birth outcomes, of which 200 000 occurred as stillbirth or neonatal death.

    HPV infection causes cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women globally, with an estimated 570 000 new cases in 2018 and over 311 000 cervical cancer deaths each year (2).

    Hepatitis B resulted in an estimated 820 000 deaths in 2019, mostly from cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (primary liver cancer).

    STIs such as gonorrhoea and chlamydia are major causes of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and infertility in women.

    Prevention of STIs

    When used correctly and consistently, condoms offer one of the most effective methods of protection against STIs, including HIV. Condoms also protect against unintended pregnancy in mutually consented sexual relationships. Although highly effective, condoms do not offer protection for STIs that cause extra-genital ulcers (i.e., syphilis or genital herpes). When possible, condoms should be used in all vaginal and anal sex.

    Safe and highly effective vaccines are available for 2 viral STIs: hepatitis B and HPV. These vaccines have represented major advances in STI prevention. By the end of 2020, the HPV vaccine was introduced as part of routine immunization programmes in 111 countries, most of them high- and middle-income. HPV vaccination could prevent the deaths of millions of women over the next decade in low- and middle-income countries, where most cases of cervical cancer occur, if high (>80%) vaccination coverage of young women (ages 11–15) can be achieved.

    Research to develop vaccines against herpes and HIV is advanced, with several vaccine candidates in early clinical development. There is mounting evidence suggesting that the vaccine to prevent meningitis (MemB) has cross-protection against gonorrhoea. More research into vaccines for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and trichomoniasis are needed.

    Other biomedical interventions to prevent some STIs include adult male circumcision and microbicides.

    Diagnosis of STIs

    Accurate diagnostic tests for STIs are widely used in high-income countries. These are especially useful for the diagnosis of asymptomatic infections. However, diagnostic tests are largely unavailable in low- and middle-income countries. Where testing is available, it is often expensive and geographically inaccessible, and patients often need to wait a long time (or need to return) to receive results. As a result, follow-up can be impeded and care or treatment can be incomplete.

    Source : www.who.int

    Healthy Living: Common Sexually Transmitted Infections Practice Flashcards

    Start studying Healthy Living: Common Sexually Transmitted Infections Practice. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Healthy Living: Common Sexually Transmitted Infections Practice

    5.0 60 Reviews

    16 studiers in the last hour

    Which of the following is NOT a reason a woman needs to be tested for STIs during pregnancy?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    D. to protect her partner from transmission

    Click again to see term 👆

    Name three STIs that can be life-threatening or lead to life-threatening illnesses.

    Click card to see definition 👆

    Responses will vary. A sample response follows: Gonorrhea, syphilis, human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be life-threatening or lead to life-threatening illnesses.

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/10 Created by morgan15wr

    Terms in this set (10)

    Which of the following is NOT a reason a woman needs to be tested for STIs during pregnancy?

    D. to protect her partner from transmission

    Name three STIs that can be life-threatening or lead to life-threatening illnesses.

    Responses will vary. A sample response follows: Gonorrhea, syphilis, human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be life-threatening or lead to life-threatening illnesses.

    If you think you may have an STI and would like to get more information, where can you learn more about STIs? Name at least three resources.

    Responses will vary. A sample response follows: Places that provide various resouces about STIs can include schools, county health agencies, health clinics, online health sites, and private doctors' offices.

    The only place you can seek treatment for an STI is at a private doctor's office.

    F

    Which bacterial STI can attack vital organs in its final stage?

    C. syphilis

    Explain why HIV is a life-threatening STI.

    Responses will vary. A sample response follows: HIV has no cure. Medications can only prolong life and treat infections. The virus weakens the immune system and in time becomes AIDS, at which time it is very difficult for the body to fight off diseases and certain cancers.

    Educating students about STIs is optional for schools in all US states.

    F

    Which of the following is commonly affected by STIs?

    C. brain

    Counseling has proven to be effective in reducing the number of individuals that become infected with STIs.

    T

    How many known STIs exist today?

    D. more than 20

    Sets with similar terms

    Exam questions part 1

    29 terms monica_crosby9

    Chapter 1 Mastering

    64 terms kelseyjohnson24

    Health 210

    31 terms asanchez5297

    Health Beyond Borders

    40 terms fshumrick

    Sets found in the same folder

    Healthy Living: Risks of Sexually Transmitted…

    10 terms morgan15wr

    Alcohol and the Body

    16 terms masterfy24PLUS

    Drugs as Medicine AND Drug Use Risks AND Choo…

    58 terms Esme_Lugo

    Understanding HIV and AIDS

    16 terms masterfy24PLUS

    Other sets by this creator

    Art History I: Baroque Art III: The Dutch Rep…

    10 terms morgan15wr

    Art I: Baroque Art I: Characteristics of Art…

    10 terms morgan15wr

    Art History I: 16th Century Art in Italy - Th…

    25 terms morgan15wr

    Art History I: 16th Century Art in Italy - Th…

    15 terms morgan15wr

    Other Quizlet sets

    Eng 270

    21 terms sheanae

    Trek: Unit 10

    28 terms SoLucy

    Biochemistry Exam I Amino Acids (Furci)

    68 terms john_snow11

    Aircraft Performance Quiz

    12 terms BrendanMaltby

    Related questions

    QUESTION

    what part of the hand do you use for palpating temperature

    15 answers QUESTION

    Your average and marginal cost is $300. You charge $500 and serve 1,000 customers. You forecast sales of 1,200 at a price of $450.

    3 answers QUESTION

    what is the etiology and pathophysiology of Obesity

    8 answers QUESTION

    what are the predisposing factors for depressive disorders

    6 answers 1/5

    Source : quizlet.com

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 11 day ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer