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    if the wind or current is pushing your boat away from the dock as you prepare to dock, which line should you secure first?

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get if the wind or current is pushing your boat away from the dock as you prepare to dock, which line should you secure first? from EN Bilgi.

    Docking With Wind or Current Away From the Dock

    Docking With Wind or Current Away From the Dock

    Approach the dock slowly at a sharp angle (about 40 degrees).

    Use reverse to stop when close to the dock. Secure the bow line.

    Put the boat in forward gear briefly, and slowly turn the steering wheel hard away from the dock—this will swing in the stern. Secure the stern line.

    Source : www.boat-ed.com

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    before casting off

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    • Keep your boat tied to the dock while you warm up the engine.

    • Make sure everyone on board is seated and wearing a life jacket.

    • Check that the engine is running properly and the departure area is clear of traffic. Then begin to cast off.

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    casting off with no wind or current

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    • Cast off the bow and stern lines.

    • Shift to forward and slowly move forward, gradually turning your boat away from the dock.

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    before casting off

    • Keep your boat tied to the dock while you warm up the engine.

    • Make sure everyone on board is seated and wearing a life jacket.

    • Check that the engine is running properly and the departure area is clear of traffic. Then begin to cast off.

    casting off with no wind or current

    • Cast off the bow and stern lines.

    • Shift to forward and slowly move forward, gradually turning your boat away from the dock.

    Casting Off With Wind or Current Toward the Dock

    • Cast off the stern line. Move and secure the bow line to a mid-boat position on the dock. Make sure fenders are in place on the bow.

    • Put the boat into forward gear briefly, and turn the steering wheel hard toward the dock. Increase speed slowly until the stern is well clear of the dock.

    • Cast off the bow line. Back out slowly until you have room to shift into forward and turn away from the dock.

    Casting Off With Wind or Current Away From the Dock

    • Cast off the bow and stern lines.

    • Use an oar or boat hook to keep the boat clear of the dock. Let the wind or current carry the boat away from the dock.

    • Once there is sufficient clearance, shift into forward gear and slowly leave the area.

    before docking

    • Reduce speed to the minimum required to maintain steerage. Use reverse gear to bring the boat to a stop well away from the dock.

    • Determine the wind and/or current direction while stopped by observing which way your boat drifts. If possible, make your approach into the wind or current, whichever is stronger. This will give you more control.

    • Have bow and stern lines ready, and put boat fenders in place. Never plan to stop a moving boat with your arms or legs.

    • When the area is clear of traffic, continue your approach.

    Docking With No Wind or Current

    • Approach the dock slowly at a narrow angle (about 20 degrees).

    • When close enough, have a passenger step on shore and secure the bow line.

    • Swing the stern in with a line or boat hook, and secure it.

    Docking With Wind or Current Toward the Dock

    • Approach slowly, parallel to the dock.

    • Let the wind or current carry your boat to the dock. Shift into gear briefly if you need to adjust position.

    • Secure the bow and stern lines.

    docking with wind or current away from the dock

    • Approach the dock slowly at a sharp angle (about 40 degrees).

    • Use reverse to stop when close to the dock. Secure the bow line.

    • Put the boat in forward gear briefly, and slowly turn the steering wheel hard away from the dock—this will swing in the stern. Secure the stern line.

    Three major responsibilities of every boater

    Practice good seamanship.

    It is the responsibility of every boat or PWC operator to take all necessary action to avoid a collision, taking into account the weather, vessel traffic, and limits of other vessels. Such action should be taken in ample time to avoid a collision and at a safe distance from other vessels.

    Keep a proper lookout.

    Failing to keep a sharp lookout is the most common cause of collisions. Every operator must keep a proper lookout, using both sight and hearing, at all times. Watch and listen for other vessels, radio communications, navigational hazards, and others involved in water activities.

    Maintain a safe speed.

    Safe speed is the speed that ensures you will have ample time to avoid a collision and can stop within an appropriate distance. Safe speed will vary depending on conditions such as wind, water conditions, navigational hazards, visibility, surrounding vessel traffic density, and the maneuverability of your boat or PWC. Always reduce speed and navigate with extreme caution at night and when visibility is restricted.

    Power-Driven Vessel Encountering Power-Driven Vessel

    • Meeting Head-On: Neither vessel is the stand-on vessel. Both vessels should turn to starboard (the right).

    • paths that cross: The vessel on the operator's port (left) is the give-way vessel. The vessel on the operator's starboard (right) is the stand-on vessel.

    • overtaking: The vessel that is overtaking another vessel is the give-way vessel. The vessel being overtaken is the stand-on vessel.

    Power-Driven Vessel Encountering Sailing Vessel

    • meeting head on: The power-driven vessel is the give-way vessel. The sailing vessel is the stand-on vessel.

    • paths that cross: The power-driven vessel is the give-way vessel. The sailing vessel is the stand-on vessel.

    • overtaking: The vessel that is overtaking another vessel is the give-way vessel, regardless of whether it is a sailing vessel or a power-driven vessel. The vessel being overtaken is always the stand-on vessel.

    Source : quizlet.com

    How should you approach a dock when the wind or current is pushing you toward the dock?

    Answer (1 of 3): You alway want to approach the dock from the side that the current and or wind is pushing you away from the dock. However, that is not always possible. If you have to dock on the side which has strong current or wind pushing you against the very first step even prior to approachi...

    How should you approach a dock when the wind or current is pushing you toward the dock?

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    3 Answers Mark Mushi

    , Work in field and this is NOT legal advice.

    Answered 2 years ago · Author has 302 answers and 524.7K answer views

    You alway want to approach the dock from the side that the current and or wind is pushing you away from the dock. However, that is not always possible. If you have to dock on the side which has strong current or wind pushing you against the very first step even prior to approaching the dock is to prepare by putting bumpers out on the side you plan on laying way to. You will also want to put docklines attached to the boat at the stern, bow and also at least one spring line. Now that you have bumpers out on the widest and ends on the boat, you are ready to dock. I approach the dock slowly. Reall

    Related questions

    How should you approach a dock when the wind is pushing you away?

    How should you approach a dock when a wind or current is pushing you away from it?

    What is the best way to approach a dock when there is a strong wind or current?

    What should you never leave the dock without?

    What is the best way to dock with no wind?

    John Kessler

    , Spent Past 75 Years With Mind and Eyes Open (1944-present)

    Answered 2 years ago · Author has 1.7K answers and 344.3K answer views

    The first answer reflects actions of a skilled vessel skipper. Unfortunately, particularly in vessels under 25 meters, such boat operators are seen more and more rarely. Marine insurors (the main sufferers in casualties), which are main motivators for changes in the boating community, increasingly suggest or even require bow and stern thrusters, which can compensate for bad conditions or less-skilled drivers. Even small boats, down to several meters length, have installed them, simply because intermittent boat operators may never gain the experience and skill to deal with suboptimal conditions

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    Bill O'Donovan

    , Captain at Williamsburg Charter Sails (2013-present)

    Answered 2 years ago · Author has 608 answers and 562.3K answer views

    Visualize the process by watching someone else do it. And check out any video

    on the subject. It’s largely trial by error, like raising kids. Key thing is to avoid going any faster than you would if you were intending to ram the dock. Steer head on toward the dock and turn as you get close to come in sideways or thereabouts. This is the singlemost deterrent to boating, so once you get the hang of it you’ll be considered a genious. Seriously. The dude in the photo above came in way too hot and is lucky not to have gone through the windshield. Men! williamsburgchartersails.com

    … (more) Related answers Related Answer Jon Noad

    , PhD. Geology & Sedimentology, London (1998)

    Answered 2 years ago · Author has 202 answers and 41.5K answer views

    What is the best way to approach a dock when there is a strong wind or current?

    Always approach the dock from a downstream or down wind direction. Aim to approach at around a 20 degree angle to the dockside. Reverse engines as the bow touches the dock and let the bow swing in to touch the dock. Quickly attach mooring ropes and you are done.

    Related Answer Joseph S. Herndon

    Answered 9 months ago · Author has 1.4K answers and 295.5K answer views

    What should you never leave the dock without?

    A boat😁

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    Related Answer Edward Hutchinson

    , former Retired Computer Programmer

    Answered 9 months ago · Author has 3.1K answers and 567.9K answer views

    How should you approach a dock when the wind is pushing you away?

    With a boat under sail there are not a lot of choices. One beam reach or the other will be favored. I would come in with a little sail as needed and let the rest luff to keep just enough speed to steer and move to windward to approach the dock. As soon as near contact is made, a line from the bow would go to a person on the dock to be secured to a cleat, or a crew member from the boat would need to leap to the dock and secure the line. Once secured the sails would be luffed and lowered. Then a stern line could bring the boat up to the dock. Approaching a windward dock single handed is a challe

    Related Answer Scott Welch

    , Boating since age 5. Own a 55 year old wooden trawler.

    Answered 2 years ago · Author has 18K answers and 53.1M answer views

    When docking your vessel and the wind is at your back, how should you approach the dock?

    This question is impossible to answer.

    First, there is no such nautical term as “at your back”. Do you mean “from astern”?

    Second, what is the orientation of the dock? Parallel to your path? Perpendicular? Down a channel?

    Source : www.quora.com

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