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    how much weight did tom hanks have to lose for castaway

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    How Did Tom Hanks Lose Weight for the Movie "Cast Away"?

    Tom Hanks lost weight for his role in “Cast Away” by following a strict diet and workout regimen. Hanks lost 55 pounds in four months by following his health plan. He ate very few carbohydrates from fruits and ate other healthy foods, such as fish and coconut milk. Hanks also ate large amounts of vegetables to help satisfy his hunger cravings. His workout plan mainly consisted of two hours of cardio training for six days a week.

    How Did Tom Hanks Lose Weight for the Movie “Cast Away”?

    Tom Hanks lost weight for his role in “Cast Away” by following a strict diet and workout regimen. Hanks lost 55 pounds in four months by following his health plan. He ate very few carbohydrates from fruits and ate other healthy foods, such as fish and coconut milk. Hanks also ate large amounts of vegetables to help satisfy his hunger cravings. His workout plan mainly consisted of two hours of cardio training for six days a week.

    Prior to filming his island scenes, Hanks gained weight to look more like a middle-aged man for his other scenes. Hank ate lots of carbohydrates and junk food to gain the weight. Once the majority of the filming completed, the production became halted for one year for Hanks to lose his weight and grow his hair and beard. During the one-year hiatus, the film’s producer used the same film crew to make another movie.

    “Cast Away” is an adventure drama film produced by Robert Zemeckis. The film stars Tom Hanks as a FedEx worker who becomes stranded on an island after his plane crashes. He must find ways to stay alive on the island using limited resources, such as the remnants of his plane’s cargo. Hanks’ performance led him to receive an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor in a Leading Role.

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    How Did Tom Hanks Lose Weight for the Movie

    Source : www.reference.com

    Lose Weight Like Tom Hanks – How He Trimmed for Cast Away Movie

    Back in December of 2000, Tom Hanks starred in the film Cast Away.  As you probably know, he plays a workaholic FedEx executive that gets stranded on a remote tropical island (supposedly for four years).  Hanks was 44 years old at the time they started shooting, and 40 pounds overweight.  By 'rap', he was a slim,…

    Lose Weight Like Tom Hanks – How He Trimmed for Cast Away Movie

    Back in December of 2000, Tom Hanks starred in the film Cast Away.  As you probably know, he plays a workaholic FedEx executive that gets stranded on a remote tropical island (supposedly for four years).  Hanks was 44 years old at the time they started shooting, and 40 pounds overweight.  By ‘rap’, he was a slim, trim, paddling machine.  But how in the world did he do it?  

    The director, Robert Zemeckis, had scheduled the movie to be shot in two stages over a period of 16 months, with a break in between; first with fat exec ‘Chuck Noland’, and the other with a healthy one.  During that break, Hanks would push himself to shed the pounds and admits his weight loss was one of the most difficult things he’s had to undergo; requiring him to lose 55 pounds in four months. 

    The hardest thing was the time.  I wish I could have just taken a pill and lost all the weight but the reality was that I had to start in October knowing that we were going to go back in February.  The idea of looking at four months of constant vigilance as far as what I ate, as well as two hours a day in the gym doing nothing but a monotonous kind of work-out, that was formidable. You have to power yourself through it almost by some sort of meditation trickery. It’s not glamorous.– Tom Hanks

    He was on a very strict diet of only water, vegetables, very little carbs, and fish.  His exercise regimen included all types of cardio for 2 hours per day, 6 days per week.  And of course, all this was doctor-supervised.

    Tom Hanks was obviously MOTIVATED to lose weight.  Whether it was to act in this amazing role, or for the millions of dollars he would earn by doing it, it doesn’t really matter.  He was motivated, and that was enough to cause him to endure whatever it took to achieve that goal!

    We too can find that same strength.  Search inside yourself to find YOUR motivation.  For some of us, that something will be just below the surface.  For others, there may be some deep digging that needs to take place… but its there.

    My shift took place when I decided I wanted take back everything I had lost by being overweight for the last number of years.  Plus, I have an amazing life yet to live in a healthy body!  Whatever your motivation is to get healthy… don’t wait another day.

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    Lose Weight Like Tom Hanks – How He Trimmed for Cast Away Movie

    Source : hastalavistafatboy.wordpress.com

    Did Tom Hanks get diabetes from Cast Away?

    Answer (1 of 3): Did Tom Hanks get diabetes from Cast Away? Oscar-winning actor Tom Hanks has battled with blood sugar for years. Find out what led to his diabetes diagnosis, and what he needs to do to keep it under control. When Tom Hanks appeared on “Late Show With David Letterman” in 2013, h...

    Q: “Did Tom Hanks get diabetes from Cast Away?”

    Absolutely not; that’s an absurd derivation. To start - it’s a MOVIE… he did NOT actually experience the conditions depicted in it.

    Second… T2 (Type 2 DM - Diabetes Mellitus), which is the type of the disease he has, is GENETIC… without the genetic markers for it, you do NOT get the disease; though environmental factors can and do accelerate its onset, and exacerbate its severity - you MUST have the genetic markers for it to develop.

    Here’s a little primer I wrote for a similar query, that outlines the disease, it’s causes, and it’s management.

    “T2 is an hereditary disease (meaning it's not only genetic, but often transferred from one generation to the next - though that's not a "requirement") caused by a certain combination of genetic alleles that cause a biochemical problem called IR - Insulin Resistance. In short - although your pancreas produces all the insulin you should need - your body's cells don't respond to it efficiently. Insulin's job is to transfer glucose (a simple form of sugar, and the only kind your body can use to fuel its cells) from the bloodstream (your body's "delivery system") into those cells. When the cells resist insulin's action - they don't get the fuel they need, and too much sugar gets "left behind" in your bloodstream - leading to the first and primary symptom, elevated BG (Blood Glucose). Elevated BG leads to the typical early symptoms of polydipsia (excessive thirst), polyurea (frequent urination), fatigue, blurry vision, and easy weight gain. Most T2s have elevated BG for a while before the symptoms are severe enough to go to the doc and get it dx'd (diagnosed).

    In response to the cellular IR - your pancreas starts overproducing insulin. At first - this works, and your BG stays in "normal" range (about 90 to 120 mg/dl all day long, with 80% of the day spent below 100 mg/dl). BUT... in time, your pancreas can no longer make enough "extra" insulin, and BG levels climb - and that's when folks get dx'd. But in all likelihood - your pancreas is still producing "more than normal" amounts of insulin - but the cellular resistance to it is too much, and that's why your BG is still too high.

    This is where the "lifestyle changes" come in. For a long time, docs have been blaming T2s for giving themselves the disease by overeating and not getting enough exercise. THAT is a LIE. You don't get the disease without the genetic markers....and there are lots of overweight lazy people that do NOT have T2. There are over 80 genetic anomalies associated with T2, but there are so far THREE that are absolutely confirmed as causative. All three are located near IRS1 (Insulin Receptor Substrate 1) on chromosome 2 of the human genome; these are SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) rs2943650, rs2943634, and rs2972146. These all cause the underlying biochemical issue of IR… but also, they pre-dispose the carrier to a tendency to gain weight easily, and fatigue readily.

    By eating a proper diet and getting regular physical activity, you CAN improve (for some, even "normalise") your BG levels. Here's why.

    The glucose in your bloodstream comes primarily from the carbohydrates you eat. When talking about a "proper" diet - we're talking about limiting carbs to a level your body can handle. The less glucose there is in your bloodstream, the better your body can transfer it to the cells. HOW MUCH to limit carbs is DIFFERENT FOR EVERYONE - which is why there are so many different approaches to meal planning for T2s. The "trick" is to learn what works for you. A gentleman named Alan Shanley has an excellent website that covers everything you need to know about this... and the primary thing you need to start is learning to count carbs, and testing your BG regularly to learn how many carbs your system can tolerate at each meal. So I'm going to give you some links to pages you should read on these subjects:

    Carb counting for beginners: https://www.bd.com/resource.aspx?IDX=9850

    Carbs by foods: http://www.med.umich.edu/1libr/MEND/CarbList.pdf

    If your doc hasn't suggested a meter - ask for a script so you can get one through your insurance, or just go to any major pharmacy and get one of their own brand; Walmart has them for about $10 (the meter will last for several years, with a few battery changes), with strips (you need a new strip for each test) for 18 cents apiece. Docs often don't think T2's need meters - but you DO. Without testing, you have no idea what your meals and exercise are doing to your BG levels.

    From Alan's site:

    Getting Started: Getting Started

    Testing with purpose (use your meter to control BG): Test, Review, Adjust

    Target BG levels: Blood Glucose Targets

    So... that covers most of the dietary issues - on to 'exercise". The reason exercise - by which we mean ANY form of regular physical activity - is important is that active cells are insulin-receptive cells. Meaning when you get regular physical activity (running, walking, swimming, bicycling - ANYTHING you enjoy and can stick to) at least 4 or 5 days a week for at least 35 or 30 minutes each day, you are improving your body's cellular response to insulin - making the insulin your body is already making more effective. If you aren't accustomed to regular activity - start with something you like for short durations, and work up over time. It's very beneficial. You'll also read about exercise lowering BG by "burning off" the glucose - which it does... BUT... that's only for as long as you're exercising. The REAL benefit is from the improvement in your cellular response to insulin, which, once you're getting in regular activity, remains all the time - NOT just when you're being active. Here’s a useful page from the endocrinology website (endocrinologists are the docs that specialize in treating diabetics): Type 2 Diabetes and Exercise

    Another excellent site on all types of DM – here’s the page on T2: Type 2 Diabetes :: Diabetes Education Online

    On T2 medications - KNOW THIS - all T2 oral meds REQUIRE the use of "diet and exercise" to be effective (read the fine print in the paperwork that comes with it). The standard starting T2 med is met, or metformin. This med does NOT actually lower BG - what it does is inhibit your body from raising your BG, which is a normal part of the glucose balance system that keeps non-D's (non-Diabetic's) BG in the 90 to 120 mg/dl range. By dulling this side of the body's response - the met is keeping your BG from getting too high too often. It's the "diet and exercise" that control the glucose you get from eating. Also - for many people, met needs to be taken for a couple of weeks before it starts having an effect on BG.

    Why is keeping BG as close to "normal" as possible important? Because elevated BG levels are what cause all the nasty complications of D - vascular damage leading to CVD and atherosclerosis, and retinopathy leading to blindness, and nephropathy leading to kidney failure, nerve damage leading to neuropathy and loss of limbs, and so on. BUT... it's not the high BG alone that does this - high BG leads to high HbA1c levels - you may have had a test referred to as an A1c test; this is a measure of the percentage of your haemoglobin that has glycated, which means bound chemically to the sugar in your blood (glucose). When that chemical binding happens - AGES are created (Advanced Glycation End productS), and it's ultimately these AGES that do the damage - they're a sticky-sweet "gunk" that adheres to, covers and smothers the tissue of the vasculature and organs, slowly killing them off (leading to the various "complications" along the way). A non-diabetic's HbA1c level ranges from 3.5% to 5.5%; the most extensive study of complications in diabetics (DCCT/EDIC studies) found that those that maintain an HbA1c level of NO MORE than 6.5% suffer the least amount of these "complications". For every point above 5.5%, the risk for those complications goes up about 30% (NIH ADVANCE collaborative group).

    Besides AGES, there is also a chemical reaction to elevated BG in the endothelial cells; this also contributes to the malfunctioning of those cells, and the damage that leads to complications… especially vascular degradation.

    Finally, for those with “pre-diabetes”… here’s a good intro from NIH on how to prevent the onset of full-blown T2, geared to those with high risk factors for it - and those with “pre-diabetes” (a condition akin to being “a little bit pregnant”): Preventing Type 2 Diabetes | NIDDK

    Another site on prevention, from the ADA: Risk Test | ADA

    Another from Mayo Clinic: Diabetes prevention: 5 tips for taking control

    A final one from the endocrinologists: Type 2 Diabetes Prevention: Here's What You Can Do

    So… that’s a brief outline of T2 and pre-diabetes; I hope you find it helpful. Good Luck!!

    Did Tom Hanks get diabetes from Cast Away?

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