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    how much is the estimated cost to the us economy as a result of excessive drinking?

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    The Cost of Excessive Alcohol Use

    The Cost of Excessive Alcohol Use

    The Cost of Excessive Alcohol Use

    The Cost of Excessive Alcohol Use

    A drain on the American economy

    $249 billion loss:

    Healthcare – $28 billion

    Workplace productivity – $179 billion

    Collisions – $13 billion

    Criminal Justice- $25 billion

    www.cdc.gov/alcohol

    The Cost of Excessive Alcohol Use

    pdf icon [PDF – 985 KB]

    Source : www.cdc.gov

    Economic costs of excessive alcohol consumption in the U.S., 2006

    On a per capita basis, the economic impact of excessive alcohol consumption in the U.S. is approximately $746 per person, most of which is attributable to binge drinking. Evidence-based strategies for reducing excessive drinking should be widely implemented.

    . 2011 Nov;41(5):516-24.

    doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.06.045.

    Economic costs of excessive alcohol consumption in the U.S., 2006

    Ellen E Bouchery  1 , Henrick J Harwood, Jeffrey J Sacks, Carol J Simon, Robert D Brewer

    Affiliations

    Affiliation

    1 Mathematica Policy Research, Washington, DC, USA.

    PMID: 22011424

    DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.06.045

    Economic costs of excessive alcohol consumption in the U.S., 2006

    Ellen E Bouchery et al. Am J Prev Med. 2011 Nov.

    . 2011 Nov;41(5):516-24.

    doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.06.045.

    Authors

    Ellen E Bouchery  1 , Henrick J Harwood, Jeffrey J Sacks, Carol J Simon, Robert D Brewer

    Affiliation

    1 Mathematica Policy Research, Washington, DC, USA.

    PMID: 22011424

    DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.06.045

    Erratum in

    Am J Prev Med. 2013 Feb;44(2):198

    Abstract

    Background: Excessive alcohol consumption causes premature death (average of 79,000 deaths annually); increased disease and injury; property damage from fire and motor vehicle crashes; alcohol-related crime; and lost productivity. However, its economic cost has not been assessed for the U.S. since 1998. Purpose: To update prior national estimates of the economic costs of excessive drinking. Methods: This study (conducted 2009-2010) followed U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines to assess the economic cost of excessive alcohol consumption in 2006. Costs for health care, productivity losses, and other effects (e.g., property damage) in 2006 were obtained from national databases. Alcohol-attributable fractions were obtained from multiple sources and used to assess the proportion of costs that could be attributed to excessive alcohol consumption. Results: The estimated economic cost of excessive drinking was $223.5 billion in 2006 (72.2% from lost productivity, 11.0% from healthcare costs, 9.4% from criminal justice costs, and 7.5% from other effects) or approximately $1.90 per alcoholic drink. Binge drinking resulted in costs of $170.7 billion (76.4% of the total); underage drinking $24.6 [corrected] billion; and drinking during pregnancy $5.2 billion. The cost of alcohol-attributable crime was $73.3 billion. The cost to government was $94.2 billion (42.1% of the total cost), which corresponds to about $0.80 per alcoholic drink consumed in 2006 (categories are not mutually exclusive and may overlap). Conclusions: On a per capita basis, the economic impact of excessive alcohol consumption in the U.S. is approximately $746 per person, most of which is attributable to binge drinking. Evidence-based strategies for reducing excessive drinking should be widely implemented.

    Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

    Comment in

    The cost of alcohol and its corresponding taxes in the U.S.: a massive public subsidy of excessive drinking and alcohol industries.

    Naimi TS. Am J Prev Med. 2011. PMID: 22011428 No abstract available.

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    The hidden cost of your drinking habit

    Your drinking habit costs a lot more than it seems.

    ECONOMIC POLICY

    The hidden cost of your drinking habit

    By Christopher Ingraham

    October 16, 2015 at 11:14 a.m. EDT

    Time to pay the tab, America. (

    @[email protected]#=img=#

    Pixonomy/Flickr )

    It's Friday, and let's face it: If you're not hungover at work this morning, you're probably wishing you were. My personal favorite hangover cure is data, and the good folks at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention just dropped a pile of sobering stats this week that may help clear your head.

    Get the full experience.

    Choose your plan

    They found out that collectively, our national drinking habit costs society $249 billion a year. That cost comes primarily from excessive drinking -- bingeing on four or more drinks per evening, or drinking heavily all week long. That total cost manifests itself primarily in things like early mortality due to alcohol ($75 billion of the total), lost productivity and absenteeism at work ($82 billion), health-care costs ($28 billion), crime ($25 billion) and car crashes ($13 billion).

    @[email protected]#=img=#

    The government pays about $100 billion of that total cost via things like Medicare and Medicaid payments, the criminal justice system and the like. The rest falls on private citizens and entities, like you and your employer.

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    These estimates are derived from a number of previous studies that examined the alcohol-attributable costs of various negative societal and health outcomes. So there's a level of abstraction and flat-out guesswork involved that's worth keeping in mind.

    @[email protected]#=img=#

    And that cost-per-drink varies by state, too, because of different economic conditions in different places. An hour of lost productivity costs differently depending on whether it happens in New York or Nebraska, for instance. The state-level per-drink cost of heavy drinking ranges from $0.92 (New Hampshire) to $2.77 (New Mexico).

    "So, Chris," I hear you saying. "If I tell you where I live and how many Jaegerbombs I pound in a given week, can you tell me how much my drinking habit is dragging the economy down?"

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    You better believe it! Use the drop-downs below to select your state and your typical weekly alcohol consumption, and you'll see the total annual societal cost of your drinking. Remember: "Drink" means "standard alcoholic beverage," or the equivalent of one 1.5-ounce shot of liquor, one 5-oz. glass of wine or one 12-oz. beer. So if you pour six ounces of Captain Morgan into a mug and top it off with a splash of coke, that counts as four drinks, not one.

    As I mentioned above, federal and state governments spend roughly $100 billion a year to deal with these costs. This amount greatly exceeds the revenue that alcohol taxes bring in, which works out to something like $16 billion a year -- $6 billion from state and local taxes, and $10 billion from federal excise taxes.

    This is why a lot of researchers think that state and federal alcohol taxes should be raised. This would have the dual benefit of making heavy drinkers drink less and helping to pay for the costs of their drinking. Federal alcohol taxes are currently at historic lows. But lawmakers, with the support of the spirits industry, want to make them even lower.

    On the other hand, the alcoholic beverage industry says that it contributes $400 billion in economic activity to the U.S. economy each year. So even with a $249 billion annual cost, the overall economic impact of our drinking habit would be a net positive.

    Regardless, the CDC's new numbers serve as a reminder that every time you toss back a drink, Uncle Sam is paying part of the tab.

    By Christopher Ingraham

    Christopher Ingraham was a reporter on The Post’s business desk from 2014 to 2021. He currently writes the Why Axis, a newsletter about the data shaping and informing our lives. Twitter

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