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    Asbestos in the Workplace

    Print the free Asbestos summary of OSHA Compliance requirements for asbestos in the workplace

    Asbestos in the Workplace - A Summary of OSHA Requirements

    Asbestos in the Workplace - A Summary of OSHA Requirements

    Asbestos in the Workplace - A Summary of OSHA Requirements Asbestos in the Workplace - A Summary of OSHA Requirements

    What Is Asbestos?

    Asbestos is a widely used, mineral-based material that is resistant to heat and corrosive chemicals. Typically, asbestos appears as a whitish, fibrous material which may release fibers that range in texture from coarse to silky; however, airborne fibers that can cause health damage may be too small to see with the naked eye. For more information, see our main asbestos information page for employers or for consumers and homeowners. You may also want the page on homeowners with asbestos shingles.

    Who Is Exposed?

    An estimated 1.3 million employees in construction and general industry face significant asbestos exposure on the job. Heaviest exposures occur in the construction industry, particularly during the removal of asbestos during renovation or demolition. Employees are also likely to be exposed during the manufacture of asbestos products (such as textiles, friction products, insulation, and other building materials) and during automotive brake and clutch repair work.

    What Are the Dangers of Asbestos Exposure?

    Exposure to asbestos can cause asbestosis (scarring of the lungs resulting in loss of lung function that often progresses to disability and to death); mesothelioma (cancer affecting the membranes lining the lungs and abdomen); lung cancer; and cancers of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and rectum.

    What Protections Are Mandatory?

    The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued revised regulations covering asbestos exposure in general industry and construction. Both standards set a maximum exposure limit and include provisions for engineering controls and respirators, protective clothing, exposure monitoring, hygiene facilities and practices, warning signs, labeling, recordkeeping, and medical exams.

    Nonasbestiform tremolite, anthophyllite, and actinolite were excluded from coverage under the asbestos standard in May 1992.

    Here are some of the highlights of the revised rules, published in the Federal Register June 20, 1986; and on Sept. 14, 1988:Permissible Exposure Limit: In both general industry and construction, workplace exposure must be limited to 0.2 fibers per cubic centimeter of air (0.2 f/cc), averaged over an eight-hour work shift. The excursion or short-term limit is one fiber per cubic centimeter of air (1 f/cc) averaged over a sampling period of 30 minutes.Exposure Monitoring: , employers must do initial monitoring for workers who may be exposed above the "action level" of 0.1 f/cc. Subsequent monitoring must be conducted at reasonable intervals, in no case longer than six months for employees exposed above the action level.

    , daily monitoring must be continued until exposure drops below the action level (0.1 f/cc). Daily monitoring is not required where employees are using supplied-air respirators operated in the positive pressure mode.

    Methods of Compliance: In both general industry and construction, employers must control exposures using engineering controls, to the extent feasible. Where engineering controls are not feasible to meet the exposure limit, they must be used to reduce employee exposures to the lowest levels attainable and must be supplemented by the use of respiratory protection.Respirators: In general industry and construction, the level of exposure determines what type of respirator is required; the standards specify the respirator to be used.Regulated Areas: In general industry and construction, regulated areas must be established where the 8-hour TWA or 30-minute excursion values for airborne asbestos exceed the prescribed permissible exposure limits. Only authorized persons wearing appropriate respirators can enter a regulated area. In regulated areas, eating, smoking, drinking, chewing tobacco or gum, and applying cosmetics are prohibited.

    must be displayed at each regulated area and must be posted at all approaches to regulated areas.

    Labels: Caution labels must be placed on all raw materials, mixtures, scrap, waste, debris, and other products containing asbestos fibers.Recordkeeping: The employer must keep an accurate record of all measurements taken to monitor employee exposure to asbestos. This record is to include: the date of measurement, operation involving exposure, sampling and analytical methods used, and evidence of their accuracy; number, duration, and results of samples taken; type of respiratory protective devices worn; name, social security number, and the results of all employee exposure measurements. This record must be kept for 30 years.Protective Clothing: For any employee exposed to airborne concentrations of asbestos that exceed the PEL, the employer must provide and require the use of protective clothing such as coveralls or similar full-body clothing, head coverings, gloves, and foot covering. Wherever the possibility of eye irritation exists, face shields, vented goggles, or other appropriate protective equipment must be provided and worn.

    , there are special regulated-area requirements for asbestos removal, renovation, and demolition operations. These provisions include a negative pressure area, decontamination procedures for workers, and a "competent person" with the authority to identify and control asbestos hazards. The standard includes an exemption from the negative pressure enclosure requirements for certain small scale, short duration operations provided special work practices prescribed in an appendix to the standard are followed.

    Source : www.ehso.com

    Lesson AssActivity Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like Using an 8-hour time-weighted average, what is the permissible exposure limit to MDA?, What must employers provide for those workers who are subject to 15 or more days of dermal exposure to MDA?, Recommended protective clothing and equipment for MDA-exposed workers may include any of the following EXCEPT: and more.

    Lesson AssActivity

    Using an 8-hour time-weighted average, what is the permissible exposure limit to MDA?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    10 ppb

    10 ppb is the permissible exposure limit to MDA when using an 8-hour time-weighted average.

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    What must employers provide for those workers who are subject to 15 or more days of dermal exposure to MDA?

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    No-cost-to-employee medical surveillance program under the supervision of a licensed physician

    A no-cost-to-employee medical surveillance program under the supervision of a licensed physician is required of employers with workers who are subject to 15 or more days of dermal exposure to MDA.

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    1/10 Created by HLS24

    Terms in this set (10)

    Using an 8-hour time-weighted average, what is the permissible exposure limit to MDA?

    10 ppb

    10 ppb is the permissible exposure limit to MDA when using an 8-hour time-weighted average.

    What must employers provide for those workers who are subject to 15 or more days of dermal exposure to MDA?

    No-cost-to-employee medical surveillance program under the supervision of a licensed physician

    A no-cost-to-employee medical surveillance program under the supervision of a licensed physician is required of employers with workers who are subject to 15 or more days of dermal exposure to MDA.

    Recommended protective clothing and equipment for MDA-exposed workers may include any of the following EXCEPT:

    Ear plugs

    Ear plugs are not one of the recommended clothing items or equipment for MDA-exposed workers.

    At a minimum, how many days per year must workers perform Class I, Class II, or Class III asbestos work before their employers are required to provide for medical examinations?

    30

    Employers of workers performing 30 days or more a year of Class I, Class II, and Class III asbestos work are required to provide medical examinations for their employees.

    The decontamination area for MDA-exposed workers, materials, and equipment must include all of the following EXCEPT:

    A medical examination area

    A medical examination area is not required in a decontamination area for MDA-exposed workers, materials, and equipment.

    How many years must employers keep records of measurements monitoring employee exposure to asbestos?

    30

    Employers must keep records of measurements monitoring employee exposure to asbestos for 30 years.

    What do Class I asbestos jobs involve?

    Removal of surfacing asbestos-containing materials

    Class I asbestos jobs involve the removal of surfacing asbestos-containing materials.

    Employers are required to post which of the following warning signs in areas where lead exposure is above the permissible limit?

    No smoking or eating

    Where lead exposure is above the permissible limit, warning signs prohibiting smoking and eating shall be posted.

    How many years must employers keep accurate records of MDA monitoring measurements?

    30

    Employers must accurately keep records of MDA monitoring measurements for 30 years.

    What is the most effective method for cleaning lead-contaminated clothing?

    Washing

    Washing is the most effective method for cleaning lead-contaminated clothing.

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    eCFR :: 29 CFR 1910.1001

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    EDITORIAL NOTE ON SUBPART Z OF PART 1910

    Editorial Note:

    Nomenclature changes to part 1910 appear at 84 FR 21597, May 14, 2019.

    § 1910.1001 Asbestos.

    (a) Scope and application.

    (1) This section applies to all occupational exposures to asbestos in all industries covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act, except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) and (3) of this section.

    (2) This section does not apply to construction work as defined in 29 CFR 1910.12(b). (Exposure to asbestos in construction work is covered by 29 CFR 1926.1101).

    (3) This section does not apply to ship repairing, shipbuilding and shipbreaking employments and related employments as defined in 29 CFR 1915.4. (Exposure to asbestos in these employments is covered by 29 CFR 1915.1001).

    (b) Definitions. Asbestos includes chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite, tremolite asbestos, anthophyllite asbestos, actinolite asbestos, and any of these minerals that have been chemically treated and/or altered.

    Asbestos-containing material (ACM) means any material containing more than 1% asbestos.

    Assistant Secretary means the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Department of Labor, or designee.

    Authorized person means any person authorized by the employer and required by work duties to be present in regulated areas.

    Building/facility owner is the legal entity, including a lessee, which exercises control over management and record keeping functions relating to a building and/or facility in which activities covered by this standard take place.

    Certified industrial hygienist (CIH) means one certified in the practice of industrial hygiene by the American Board of Industrial Hygiene.

    Director means the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or designee.

    Employee exposure means that exposure to airborne asbestos that would occur if the employee were not using respiratory protective equipment.

    Fiber means a particulate form of asbestos 5 micrometers or longer,with a length-to-diameter ratio of at least 3 to 1.

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter means a filter capable of trapping and retaining at least 99.97 percent of 0.3 micrometer diameter mono-disperse particles.

    Homogeneous area means an area of surfacing material or thermal system insulation that is uniform in color and texture.

    Industrial hygienist means a professional qualified by education, training, and experience to anticipate, recognize, evaluate and develop controls for occupational health hazards.

    PACM means “presumed asbestos containing material.”

    Presumed asbestos containing material means thermal system insulation and surfacing material found in buildings constructed no later than 1980. The designation of a material as “PACM” may be rebutted pursuant to paragraph (j)(8) of this section.

    Regulated area means an area established by the employer to demarcate areas where airborne concentrations of asbestos exceed, or there is a reasonable possibility they may exceed, the permissible exposure limits.

    Surfacing ACM means surfacing material which contains more than 1% asbestos.

    Surfacing material means material that is sprayed, troweled-on or otherwise applied to surfaces (such as acoustical plaster on ceilings and fireproofing materials on structural members, or other materials on surfaces for acoustical, fireproofing, and other purposes).

    Thermal System Insulation (TSI) means ACM applied to pipes, fittings, boilers, breeching, tanks, ducts or other structural components to prevent heat loss or gain.

    Thermal System Insulation ACM means thermal system insulation which contains more than 1% asbestos.

    (c) Permissible exposure limit (PELS) -

    (1) Time-weighted average limit (TWA). The employer shall ensure that no employee is exposed to an airborne concentration of asbestos in excess of 0.1 fiber per cubic centimeter of air as an eight (8)-hour time-weighted average (TWA) as determined by the method prescribed in appendix A to this section, or by an equivalent method.

    (2) Excursion limit. The employer shall ensure that no employee is exposed to an airborne concentration of asbestos in excess of 1.0 fiber per cubic centimeter of air (1 f/cc) as averaged over a sampling period of thirty (30) minutes as determined by the method prescribed in appendix A to this section, or by an equivalent method.

    (d) Exposure monitoring -

    Source : www.ecfr.gov

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