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    how many fire extinguishers must be carried onboard power boats, with installed fuel tanks, between 26 and 40 feet in length?

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    Fire Extinguishers Requirements for the Recreational Boater FAQ

    Q1. Where can I find the recently published final rule on regulations for fire protection for recreational vessels?

    A1.  The rule may be found at https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2021/10/22/2021-22578/fire-protection-for-recreational-vessels#sectno-reference-175.320. The regulation may be found in 33 CFR Chapter 1, Subchapter S Part 175 Subpart E .

    Q2. What is the effective date of the fire protection for recreational vessels regulation?

    A2.  The rule takes effect on April 20, 2022.

    Q3. How do I tell if my fire extinguisher is expired?

    A3.  If your disposable (non-rechargeable) fire extinguisher has the Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL) Trademark, a date of manufacture stamped on the bottle, and it is older than 12 years since the date, the extinguisher is considered expired and must be removed from service. Look for wording on the bottle stating, “This product must be removed from service within 12 years after date of manufacturing”.

    Q4. How can I tell if a fire extinguisher is approved for use on boats?

    A4.  The label on the bottle will state “Marine Type – USCG Approved”. Underwriters Labs approves fire extinguishers on behalf of the USCG

    Q5. Are there any changes for when marine fire extinguishers are required or the number of extinguishers required?

    A5.  No. If your boat was required to carry a fire extinguisher, it is still required to do so under this new regulation. There is also no change to the quantity required.

    Q6. Which recreational boats are required to carry marine fire extinguishers?

    A6.  All recreational boats with:

    1. Permanently installed fuel tank(s), or

    2. Spaces that are capable of trapping fumes, such as a

    a. Closed compartment under thwarts and seats wherein portable fuel tanks may be stored.

    b. Double bottom not sealed to the hull or that is not completely filled with flotation material.

    c. Closed living space.

    d. Closed stowage compartment in which combustible or flammable materials is stowed.

    Table 2 to §175.320( a )( 2 )

    Location identified in Figure 1 to §175.320(a)(2)Condition requiring fire extinguishers1Closed compartments under thwarts and seats wherein portable fuel tanks may be stored.2Double bottoms not sealed to the hull or which are not completely filled with flotation material.3Closed living spaces.4Closed stowage compartments in which combustible or flammable materials are stowed5Permanently installed fuel tanks.

    Figure 1 showing compartments where vapors may become trapped

    Q7. Are there any motorized recreational boats exempt from having to carry a fire extinguisher?

    A7.  Yes. If your boat is less than 26’ feet in length, uses an outboard engine, fuel is in a portable fuel tank, and there are no areas within the boat where fuel vapors can be trapped, the boat is not required to have a fire extinguisher.

    Q8. How many USCG approved marine fire extinguishers do I need to have readily accessible onboard my boat?

    A8.  You are required to carry a quantity of 5-B or 20-B UL-rated USCG approved extinguishers as required in the chart shown here for recreational boats 65 feet in length and less. There are also 10-B rated extinguishers available. Although the math would tell you that one 10-B rated extinguisher equals two 5-B extinguishers, it does not. The 10-B extinguishers only count as one 5-B even though they do contain more extinguishing agent than a 5-B.

    All recreational vessels of model year 2018 and newer must carry 5-B or 20-B rated fire extinguishers that are date stamped. Vessels older than model year 2018 may carry either 5-B or 20-B rated fire extinguishers that, if portable, are either not date stamped or not more than 12 years old or B-I or B-II rated fire extinguishers that are in good and serviceable condition.

    Boat model year of 2018 and newer. NOTE - may carry only 5-B or 20-B rated fire extinguishers with date stampLength (feet)Minimum number of 5-B rated portable fire extinguishers required1If no fixed fire extinguishing system in machinery spaceIf fixed fire extinguishing system in machinery spaceUnder 161016 but less than 261026 but less than 402140 up to 6532

    1 One 20-B, rated portable fire extinguisher may be substituted for two 5-B portable fire extinguishers.  One 10-B is not a substitute for two 5-B.

    Boat model year between 1953 and 2017NOTE - may carry either 5-B, 20-B rated extinguishers with date stamp or B-I, B-II rated fire extinguishersLength (feet)Minimum number of B-I/5-B, or B-II/20-B rated portable fire extinguishers required1

    Source : uscgboating.org

    Vessels 26 to 40 feet

    Vessels 36 to 40 feet

    Home Boating Boater Education Equipment Vessels 26 to 40 feet

    Vessels 26 to 40 feet

    Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs)

    One approved Type I, II or III for each person on board or being towed on water skis etc., in addition, one throwable Type IV device

    Must be USCG-approved. Must be in serviceable condition. Must be properly stored.

    NOTE: A Type V hybrid may substituted for any Type I, II or III device, but it must actually be worn whenever the vessel is underway and the person is not in the cabin or other enclosed area.Water Skier: Every person skiing or aquaplaning must wear an approved Type I, II or III PFD. Inflatable PFDs are prohibited.

    Fire Extinguisher

    At least two B-I type approved hand-held portable fire extinguisher or at least one B-II type approved hand-held portable fire extinguisher.

    The fire extinguisher must be USCG approved and must be in serviceable condition.

    NOTE: When an approved fixed fire extinguishing system is installed in the machinery space(s), it may be counted in the place of one B-I type hand-held portable fire extinguisher. Some fire extinguishers require specific mounting brackets for approval. Read the label on your fire extinguisher for this information.

    Visual Distress Signal

    Required on the high sea and coastal waters only.

    Must carry visual distress signal for both day and nighttime use.

    NOTE: Coastal waters means the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and all bays, sounds, harbors, rivers, inlets, etc. where any entrance is over 2 miles wide to the first point where the distance between shorelines narrows to 2 miles.

    Sound-producing Device (bell, horn, whistle, etc.)

    Every vessel less than 12 meters (39.4 ft) in length must carry an efficient sound-producing device. The sound-producing device need not meet any particular specifications, as long as the vessel can produce signals required by the navigational rules.

    Backfire Flame Control

    An effective means of controlling backfire flame of all gasoline engines installed after April 25, 1940, except outboard motors.

    Backfire flame arrestors must be USCG-approved.

    Ventilation (Boats built prior to Aug. 1, 1980)

    At least two ventilator ducts fitted with cowls or their equivalent for the purpose of properly and efficiently ventilating the bilges of every closed engine and fuel -tank compartment of boats constructed or decked over after April 25, 1940, using gasoline as fuel or other fuels having a flash point of 110 degrees or less.

    Ventilation (Boats built after Aug. 1, 1980)

    At least two ventilator ducts for the purpose of efficiently ventilating every closed compartment that contains a gasoline engine and every closed compartment containing a gasoline tank, except for those having permanently installed tanks which vent outside the boat and contain no unprotected electrical devices. Also, engine compartments containing a gasoline engine having a cranking motor must contain power operated exhaust blowers which can be controlled from the instrument panel.

    Vessel Lighting

    Recreational vessels are required to display navigation lights between sunset and sunrise and during periods of reduced visibility (fog, rain, haze, etc). The U.S. Coast Guard Navigation Rules specify lighting requirements for every description of watercraft. The information provided is for vessels less than 65.5 feet/20 meters in length.

    Recommendations

    We further suggest that you equip your vessel with an anchor and a sufficient amount of anchor line; a de-watering device, such as a bilge pump in the event of flooding; and an oar, paddle or other alternative means of propulsion in case your engine fails. If the above equipment requirements and suggestions are met, you may be eligible to display an FWC or Coast Guard Auxiliary safety decal. For more information, please contact your local FWC office.

    Source : myfwc.com

    Boat Fire Extinguishers Regulations & Maintenance

    The size of boat you're operating will determine what fire extinguisher you're required to carry. Learn the different types & requirements for each.

    Boat Fire Extinguisher Regulations, Classes & Maintenance

    Boat Fire Extinguisher Regulations, Classes & Maintenance Boat Fire Extinguisher Regulations

    It's time to introduce the next important piece of safety equipment on your boat: the fire extinguisher.

    Important

    Effective April 20, 2022, any non-rechargeable (disposable) fire extinguisher that is older than 12 years should be removed from service. Refer to the date of manufacturing stamped on the bottle; for example, "05" means "2005."

    You are required by law to have a fire extinguisher on board if your boat has an engine and meets any of the following conditions:

    Your boat has closed compartments where portable fuel tanks may be stored.

    Your boat has a double bottom that is not sealed to the hull and that is not completely filled with flotation materials.

    Your boat has closed living spaces.

    Your boat has permanently installed fuel tanks.

    Or if your boat has any inboard engine.

    It is not required by law to carry a fire extinguisher on other types of boats but it is still highly recommended. Fires can happen unexpectedly and it's always a smart idea to be prepared.

    Important

    The following information is effective April 20, 2022.

    Vessels that have a model year of 2018 and newer may carry only 5-B or 20-B rated fire extinguishers with date stamp.

    Vessels with a model year between 1953 and 2017 may carry either:

    Unexpired 5-B or 20-B rated fire extinguishers.

    Or B-I or B-II rated fire extinguishers that are in good and serviceable condition.

    When required by the USCG, fire extinguishers must be on board a vessel and readily accessible—where they can be easily reached. When deciding on a place to store a fire extinguisher, make sure to consider how easy it is to reach in the event of a fire. It is recommended that the fire extinguisher be conspicuously and securely mounted on its intended hanger or bracket.

    Now, let's quickly review the number of and types of fire extinguishers you need on your boat.

    If your boat is less than 26 feet, you need one 5-B fire extinguisher on board.

    If your boat is between 26 and 40 feet, you need either two 5-B fire extinguishers or a single 20-B fire extinguisher.

    And finally, if your boat is between 40 and 65 feet, you need either three 5-B fire extinguishers or one 20-B fire extinguisher and one 5-B fire extinguisher.

    If your boat is longer than 65 feet, check the federal regulations.

    Boat Length Extinguisher Requirement

    Less than 26 ft.

    26 ft. to less than 40 ft.

    40 ft. to less than 65 ft.

    Greater than 65 ft. Must meet federal requirements

    Inboard engines When the engine compartment is equipped with a fixed (built-in) extinguishing system, one less 5-B extinguisher is required onboard.

    Note: One 20-B portable fire extinguisher may be substituted for two 5-B portable fire extinguishers. For vessels with a model year between 1953 and 2017, one 20-B/B-II portable fire extinguisher may be substituted for two 5-B/B-I portable fire extinguishers.

    Glossary

    model year

    The period beginning June 1 of a year and ending on July 31 of the following year and being designated by the year in which it ends

    Fire Extinguisher Classification

    Fires are classed depending on their fuel source: solid, liquid or electrical. Each fire burns differently and requires a specific type of extinguisher. That's why every fire extinguisher is marked with a letter, like A, B or C. The letter indicates both the class of fire extinguisher and the class of fire it is designed to put out.

    Fire Types Are:

    CLASS A: Combustible solids

    CLASS B: Flammable liquids

    CLASS C: Electrical fires

    Class A fires have a solid combustible fuel source like wood or paper. You can use water, or a Class A fire extinguisher, to put out this type of fire.Class B fires, on the other hand, have a flammable liquid fuel source, like gasoline. Do not use water to put out a Class B fire as it will just spread the fire. Instead, use a Class B fire extinguisher.

    Finally, a Class C fire is an electrical fire. Like a Class B fire, never use water on a Class C fire. Use a Class C fire extinguisher.

    Because gasoline fires are the most common type of boat fire, marine-rated Class B fire extinguishers are the class required on most boats. The number before the B, for example a 5-B or 20-B extinguisher, indicates the square footage of the fire the extinguisher can put out.

    It's important to note that you can also get fire extinguishers that put out multiple types of fires. A Class ABC fire extinguisher, which can handle all fires, is therefore the most recommended class of extinguisher.

    Source : www.boaterexam.com

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