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    how many days to quarantine after testing positive for covid

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    COVID

    Find guidance for health departments on people in U.S. communities exposed to a person with known or suspected COVID-19 or community-related exposure.

    Back to COVID-19 Home

    Quarantine & Isolation

    Updated Mar. 30, 2022

    Quarantine and Isolation Calculator

    A tool to help determine how long you need to isolate, quarantine, or take other steps to prevent spreading COVID-19.

    Get Started

    This information is intended for a general audience. Healthcare professionals should see Ending Isolation and Precautions for People with COVID-19.

    People with COVID-19 and close contacts should follow the recommendations outlined on this page. These recommendations do not change based on COVID-19 community levels.

    On this Page

    When to Stay Home Quarantine Isolation

    Recommendations for Specific Settings

    Ongoing COVID-19 Exposure FAQs

    Quarantine

     If you were exposed

    Quarantine and stay away from others when you have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19.

    Isolate

    If you are sick or test positive

    Isolate when you are sick or when you have COVID-19, even if you don’t have symptoms.

    When to Stay Home

    Calculating Quarantine

    The date of your exposure is considered day 0. Day 1 is the first full day after your last contact with a person who has had COVID-19. Stay home and away from other people for at least 5 days. Learn why CDC updated guidance for the general public.

    IF YOUWere exposed to COVID-19 and are NOT up to date on COVID-19 vaccinationsQuarantine for at least 5 daysStay home

    Stay home and quarantine for at least 5 full days.

    Wear a well-fitting mask if you must be around others in your home.

    Do not travel.Get tested

    Even if you don’t develop symptoms, get tested at least 5 days after you last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

    After quarantine

    Watch for symptoms

    Watch for symptoms until 10 days after you last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

    Avoid travel

    It is best to avoid travel until a full 10 days after you last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

    If you develop symptoms

    Isolate immediately and get tested. Continue to stay home until you know the results. Wear a well-fitting mask around others.

    Take precautions until day 10Wear a well-fitting mask

    Wear a well-fitting mask for 10 full days any time you are around others inside your home or in public. Do not go to places where you are unable to wear a well-fitting mask.

    If you must travel during days 6-10, take precautions.Avoid being around people who are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19.IF YOUWere exposed to COVID-19 and are up to date on COVID-19 vaccinationsNo quarantineYou do not need to stay home unless you develop symptoms.Get tested

    Even if you don’t develop symptoms, get tested at least 5 days after you last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

    Watch for symptoms

    Watch for symptoms until 10 days after you last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

    If you develop symptoms

    Isolate immediately and get tested. Continue to stay home until you know the results. Wear a well-fitting mask around others.

    Take precautions until day 10Wear a well-fitting mask

    Wear a well-fitting mask for 10 full days any time you are around others inside your home or in public. Do not go to places where you are unable to wear a well-fitting mask.

    Take precautions if travelingAvoid being around people who are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19.IF YOUwere exposed to COVID-19 and had confirmed COVID-19 within the past 90 days (you tested positive using a viral test)No quarantine

    You do not need to stay home unless you develop symptoms.

    Watch for symptoms

    Watch for symptoms until 10 days after you last had close contact with someone with COVID-19.

    If you develop symptoms

    Isolate immediately and get tested. Continue to stay home until you know the results. Wear a well-fitting mask around others.

    Take precautions until day 10Wear a well-fitting mask

    Wear a well-fitting mask for 10 full days any time you are around others inside your home or in public. Do not go to places where you are unable to wear a well-fitting mask.

    Take precautions if travelingAvoid being around people who are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19.

    Calculating Isolation

    Day 0 is your first day of symptoms or a positive viral test. Day 1 is the first full day after your symptoms developed or your test specimen was collected. If you have COVID-19 or have symptoms, isolate for at least 5 days.

    IF YOUTested positive for COVID-19 or have symptoms, regardless of vaccination statusStay home for at least 5 days

    Stay home for 5 days and isolate from others in your home.

    Wear a well-fitting mask if you must be around others in your home.

    Source : www.cdc.gov

    Quarantine and isolation

    If you test positive for COVID-19, you should isolate to protect others. If you are exposed, you should get tested, and may need to quarantine. On this page: Quarantine vs. isolation If you were exposed but have no symptoms If you test positive or have symptoms High-risk settings Exceptions Support during quarantine or isolation Questions […]

    Quarantine and isolation

    Last updated June 20, 2022 at 3:32 PM

    If you test positive for COVID-19, you should isolate to protect others. If you are exposed, you should get tested, and may need to quarantine.

    On this page:

    Quarantine vs. isolationIf you were exposed but have no symptomsIf you test positive or have symptomsHigh-risk settingsExceptionsSupport during quarantine or isolationQuestions and answers

    Quarantine vs. isolation

    Quarantine means staying home. Itis no longer required for most people who have been exposed, but test negative. But it may be recommended if you live or work in a high-risk setting.Isolation means staying home and away from others in your household. It is for people who are ill or test positive.

    Read more at CDPH’s Isolation and Quarantine Guidance and CDC’s Quarantine and Isolation.

    If you were exposed but have no symptoms

    Regardless of your vaccination status:

    Get tested 3-5 days from last exposure

    Wear a mask around others for 10 days, even at home

    If test result is positive, isolate

    If you had COVID-19 within the last 90 days:

    You don’t need to test unless symptoms start

    If symptoms start, isolate and get tested

    Learn more in What to Do if You Are Exposed from CDPH.

    If you test positive or have symptoms

    Regardless of your vaccination status or infection history:

    Isolate for at least 5 days

    Sleep and stay in a separate room from those not infected

    Use a separate bathroom if you can

    Wear a mask around others, even at home

    Get tested (antigen preferred) on Day 5

    End isolation on Day 6 if:

    You test negative, AND

    Have no fever for 24 hours without taking fever-reducing medication, AND

    Your other symptoms are gone or going

    End isolation on Day 10 if:

    You test positive on Day 5 or don’t test, AND

    You have no fever for 24 hours without taking fever-reducing medication

    If you still have a fever, continue to isolate until it’s been gone for 24 hours

    After you recover, wear a mask around others for 10 full days after start of symptoms or your positive test

    For children who test positive:

    Children under 2 can end isolation on Day 6 without a negative test

    Children 2 years and older should follow the steps above for ending isolation

    Learn more in What to Do if You Test Positive from CDPH.

    High-risk settings

    Work exclusion or quarantine is advised for some exposed workers and residents in high-risk settings.

    High-risk settings include:

    Emergency shelters

    Cooling and heating centers

    Some healthcare settings

    Local correctional facilities and detention centers

    Homeless shelters Long-term care

    If you’ve completed your primary vaccination series and booster (if eligible):

    You don’t need to quarantine or stay home from work unless symptoms start

    Get tested immediately and on Day 3-5 following exposure

    If you test positive or symptoms start, isolate

    If you had COVID-19 within the last 90 days:

    You don’t need to test, quarantine, or stay home from work unless symptoms start

    If symptoms start, isolate and get tested

    If you’re not vaccinated, are incompletely-vaccinated, or have completed your primary vaccination series and are booster-eligible but not boosted:

    Quarantine or stay home from work for at least 5 days

    Wear a mask around others

    Get tested on Day 5

    If you test positive or symptoms develop, isolate

    If you test negative and have no symptoms, end quarantine or work exclusion after Day 5

    If you don’t test and have no symptoms, end quarantine or work exclusion after Day 10

    Exceptions

    Rules for isolation and quarantine may be more restrictive in your area. Check your area’s COVID-19 website.

    This isolation and quarantine guidance does not apply in some healthcare settings. See CDPH Guidance on Quarantine and Isolation for Health Care Personnel.

    Support during quarantine or isolation

    If you can’t work because you have COVID-19 or are near someone who has it, you can file a Disability Insurance (DI) claim.

    If you can’t work because you are caring for a family member with COVID-19, there is help for your lost wages. File a Paid Family Leave (PFL) claim.

    In both these cases, you must have a note from a healthcare worker.

    Questions and answers

    When can I be around other people after I tested positive for COVID-19 but had no symptoms?

    If I test positive for COVID-19, what should I do to protect others in my household?

    Source : covid19.ca.gov

    What to do if you test positive for Covid after your symptoms are gone

    Some people are still testing positive for Covid, even after their symptoms are gone. Here's what you need to know about it, and what to do if it happens to you.

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    HEALTH AND WELLNESS

    What to do if you keep testing positive for Covid—even after your symptoms are gone

    Published Wed, Jun 15 20229:10 AM EDTUpdated Tue, Jun 21 20223:43 PM EDT

    Natalie A. Rahhal, Special to CNBC

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    wayra, E+ via Getty

    Even after the fever has broken, the runny nose has dried up, the official five-day quarantine period has ended and the 10-day precautionary phase is over, some people are still testing positive for Covid — despite feeling totally fine.

    If you find yourself in this situation, you might be puzzled over what to do, particularly since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers little specific guidance on this front. It’s difficult to know exactly how many people this affects — most people self-test at home, so their results are untracked — but a pre-vaccine study of Florida school children in 2020 found that 8.2% of high school kids still tested positive 9-14 days after their first positive tests.

    Even small percentages can affect millions of people, as the country’s total case count continues to rise: The U.S. has surpassed 85.7 million total Covid cases since the pandemic began, according to data from Johns Hopkins University, likely an undercount due to those at-home tests.

    Here’s what you need to know about the phenomenon, and what to do if it happens to you:

    What you should do if you keep testing positive after 10 days

    Testing positive for Covid doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re contagious. Rapid tests detect certain protein pieces of the virus, but those proteins alone don’t cause infection. The same goes for PCR tests, which identify the virus’ genetic material in your system.

    So, to work out if positive tests mean people are infectious, scientists culture samples from these tests in petri dishes to see if more virus can grow, indicating that it’s still alive and contagious. A recent Boston University study, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, used this technique and found that just 17% of people were likely still contagious six days after their first positive tests.

    Unfortunately, there’s currently no way to know which category you’re in. But most experts say that as long as your symptoms are gone, you probably don’t need to isolate anymore.

    The CDC recommends isolating for five days after you first test positive, and ending your quarantine as long as you’ve been fever-free for 24 hours and your symptoms are improving. The agency’s guidance adds that you should keep wearing a mask through day 10 — essentially a precaution in case you’re still contagious.

    Dr. Monica Gandhi, an infectious disease specialist at the University of California, San Francisco, says she’d “feel really comfortable” with a symptom-free person emerging after five days of isolation, even if they’re still testing positive for Covid.

    “Follow CDC guidance and wear a mask for the following five days,” she says.

    Dr. Wilbur Lam, a pediatrics and biomedical engineering professor who led Emory University’s initiative to test Covid-19 diagnostics for the U.S. government, particularly recommends avoiding contact with people who may have compromised immune systems, or wearing a mask if you can’t avoid the risk.

    “Scientists, including our own center, are really trying to figure out what the variables are that may affect why one becomes persistently positive on rapid tests, and what the implications are both from a biological and a public health standpoint,” he says.

    What testing positive for more than 10 days could mean for your long-term health 

    Last month, the CDC issued an alarming warning that as many as one in five adult COVID-19 survivors may develop long Covid, potentially including long-term symptoms from fatigue and brain fog to circulation and digestive issues. Women, older people and those with chronic health conditions all appear to be at higher risk.

    Covid isn’t the only pathogen that can cause such issues: Dr. Jeremy Kamil, a virologist at Louisiana State University Health Shreveport, notes that other viruses, like human papillomaviruses, can also wreak havoc on the body weeks or even years after the initial infection.

    More than 10 days of positive tests are not a known risk factor for long Covid, but they do raise questions about where the virus could linger. Some viruses are known to hide in tissues that don’t produce symptoms — like fat cells or the gut, for example — before reemerging once it thinks the coast is clear.

    Incidentally, this is one theory for why some people test positive for Covid beyond 10 days — but for now, it’s just a theory. Experts stress that if you do keep testing positive after your week-and-a-half stint is over, you probably don’t need to worry: The precautions are important to take, but you’re unlikely to harm yourself or those around you by ending your isolation.

    That’ll remain true unless further research proves otherwise.

    Source : www.cnbc.com

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