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    Myths and Facts About Fevers in Children and Infants

    When your child has a fever, it can be difficult to tell whether it’s serious enough to see a pediatrician. Dr. Cindy Gellner goes over some myths and facts about fevers in children and infants, including how to tell low-grade and high-grade fevers apart and how to treat each. She also gives some hints about fevers that will help you keep calm while your child is ill.

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    MYTHS AND FACTS ABOUT FEVERS IN CHILDREN AND INFANTS

    When your child has a fever, it can be difficult to tell whether it’s serious enough to see a pediatrician. Dr. Cindy Gellner goes over some myths and facts about fevers in children and infants, including how to tell low-grade and high-grade fevers apart and how to treat each. She also gives some hints about fevers that will help you keep calm while your child is ill.

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    Jun 8, 2018

    Dr. Cindy Gellner: Fever phobia. It is something I talk about on a daily basis. What is a fever? Do I need to worry, and when is it too high? I'm Dr. Cindy Gellner, and that's today on The Scope.Announcer: Keep your kids healthy and happy. You are now entering The Healthy Kids Zone, with Dr. Cindy Gellner, on The Scope.Dr. Cindy Gellner: I get a lot of questions about fevers, and there's a lot of misconceptions, too, about fevers. When is it something you really need to be very concerned about, and when is it something that you can say, "Okay, this is something I can manage"?

    High or Low Grade Fever?

    One of the first questions your pediatrician will ask if you come in for a cold, for a fever, or for something else that's an illness is and you're asked, "Did they have a fever?" And if you say, "Yes," the first question we're going to ask is, "How high?" A lot of people will just say, "Oh, they felt warm."

    Well, it's really important from a doctor's point of view that you tell us exactly what the temperature was. That tells us how concerned we should be, or if this is something we would expect with whatever you're bringing your child in for.

    So let's discuss a couple of things about fevers to help you put this all into perspective. First, fevers are bad for children. Wrong. Fevers turn off the body's immune system. A fever is actually a good sign that your body is working to fight off an infection. Most fevers between 100 and 104 are okay for sick kids.

    When Should Babies/Infants Be Seen for Fever

    The exception is babies less than three months of age. If they have a temperature of 100.4 or higher, and that's a rectal temperature 100.4 or higher, they must be seen right away. That is when we really start getting worried about infections in babies that are dangerous.

    What about fevers over 104? Can they cause brain damage? No. Fevers with infections don't cause brain damage. Only body temperatures over 108 can cause brain damage. The body's thermometer goes high, but extreme environmental temperatures, such as if a child is in a closed car in hot weather, that's when you start worrying about the fever going high and causing brain damage.

    The next concern is that, "What if my child has a fever? They can have a febrile seizure, which is a seizure that's triggered a fever." Well, the truth is only about four percent of children have febrile seizures, and while they may be scary to watch, they usually stop within five minutes, they don't cause permanent harm, and children who have febrile seizures are not at greater risk for developmental delay, learning disabilities, or epilepsy.

    Fever Treatment

    Do all fevers need to be treated with fever medicine? Well, only if they cause discomfort. Look to see how your child is acting. If a fever is 102 or 103, you're going to notice that your child's not feeling so great. They're tired. They're cranky. But I've seen kids with a fever of 101 running around in my office. So go by what your child looks like and how they're acting rather by the number on the thermometer.

    "But what if I don't give them anything for their fever? Won't the fever keep going higher?" No. The brain has an internal thermostat, and fevers from infection top out at about 103 and 104. They usually don't go higher than that.

    "Well, if I get them something, the fever should come down to normal." No. Even if you treat it with it with Tylenol, fevers usually only come down two or three degrees, and it can take about two or three hours for the fever to come down.

    "If the fever doesn't come down, the cause has got to be something serious." Well, no. Not necessarily. Fevers that don't respond to fever medicine can be caused by viruses or bacteria, and, again, it doesn't matter if the medicine works or not because you want to make sure you look at your child's other symptoms. You can have a child with a severe virus. Bad colds. We're seeing a lot of really nasty viruses and fevers of 103, close to 104 in the office, but these are all from viruses lately.

    "Once the fever comes down, it should stay down." Well, fevers only last two or three days with most viral illnesses. Actually, doctors don't even start worrying until a fever has lasted for five or more days.

    Fever Lasting Longer Than Five Days?

    When the medicine wears off, the fever's going to come back because this is, again, your body's way of trying to fight off an infection. So once your body overpowers the virus, usually by the fourth day, then the fever goes down. If it doesn't go down, then, yes, it's a good idea to make sure your child doesn't have some bacterial like an infection, a urinary tract infection, or something else that would require antibiotics to treat.

    Source : healthcare.utah.edu

    How long does it take for Tylenol to start working?

    Official answer: The time it takes for Tylenol (acetaminophen) to start working depends on the formulation. Oral preparations must first...

    How long does it take for Tylenol to start working?

    Medically reviewed by Carmen Fookes, BPharm. Last updated on Aug 24, 2021.

    Official answer

    by Drugs.com

    The time it takes for Tylenol (acetaminophen) to start working depends on the formulation. Oral preparations must first dissolve in the stomach and then get absorbed into the bloodstream before they have an effect. The approximate length of time it may take before you notice a reduction in your pain if Tylenol is taken on an empty stomach are:

    Orally disintegrating tablets, oral Tylenol liquid: 20 minutes

    Oral tablets, extended-release tablets: 30 to 45 minutes

    Intravenous acetaminophen: 5 to 10 minutes.

    If Tylenol is taken on a full stomach it may take up to twice as long for it to have an effect, depending on the preparation. Generally, it takes longer for Tylenol to reduce fever than it does for it to relieve pain.

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    Fevers In Adults: What You Should Know & How to Treat l TYLENOL®

    Fevers in adults occur when the body temperature rises above its normal temperature range. Find out common causes, symptoms & treatment of fever in adults.

    Adult Fevers: What To Know & How To Treat

    A fever is when your body temperature rises above its normal temperature range.

    It’s a sign that your immune system is working properly to fight off causes of the fever such as a cold, flu, or other infection.

    Fever Grades

    A normal body temperature is approximately 98.6 °F, but may fluctuate depending on the time of day or what temperature reading method was used. While any temperature above your normal temperature range is considered a fever, there are different levels of fever severity.

    Adult Fever Chart

    Low-Grade FeverModerate-Grade FeverHigh-Grade Fever*

    >98.6 °F-100.4 °F 100.4 °F-102.2 °F >102.2 °F

    *A temperature reading at or above 104 °F is called hyperpyrexia and is considered a medical emergency requiring immediate care.

    Symptoms

    Overheating Sweating Chills Discomfort Achy muscles Rash

    Restlessness or Sleeplessness

    Headache Weakness Decreased appetite

    Causes

    A fever is your body’s natural defense against bacterial or viral infection, and is actually an indication that your immune system is doing its job. When you’re sick, your body temperature rises in an attempt to kill the temperature-sensitive bacteria causing the infection. Fevers are most commonly associated with colds & flu and will usually subside on their own within a few days.

    Treatment

    While most fevers are harmless, these tips & tricks can help make yours more manageable. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns.

    Fluids

    Drinking plenty of water can not only prevent dehydration, but can also help lower your body temperature.

    Rest

    Your body is working on overdrive to fight off infection. Be sure to get plenty of sleep so you can recharge.

    Light Foods

    Eat foods that are easy to digest, like crackers and soup. Avoid dairy products like milk and cheese.

    Cool Compress

    Apply a damp washcloth to your forehead to help lower your temperature.

    Pain Reliever

    Pain relievers containing acetaminophen can help alleviate head and body aches and lower your temperature. TYLENOL® is the #1 doctor recommended brand of pain reliever.

    TYLENOL® Cold + Flu Severe Caplets

    Convenient caplets to tackle your tough cold and flu symptoms.

    *Up to 8 hours

    PRODUCTS

    Preparing for Flu Season

    Here's what you need to stock up on for flu season and what you can do to prevent.

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    Source : www.tylenol.com

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