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    How fast does the Space Station travel?

    How fast does the Space Station travel? | Cool Cosmos

    How fast does the Space Station travel?

    The International Space Station travels in orbit around Earth at a speed of roughly 17,150 miles per hour (that's about 5 miles per second!). This means that the Space Station orbits Earth (and sees a sunrise) once every 92 minutes! You can see the ISS' location and speed at this link which also has a real-time video feed from cameras attached to the outside of the station.

    Source : coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu

    International Space Station Facts and Figures

    International Space Station Facts and Figures

    Nov 4, 2021

    International Space Station Facts and Figures

    Space Station Facts

    An international partnership of five space agencies from 15 countries operates the International Space Station. Learn more about visitors to the space station by country.

    The space station has been continuously occupied since November 2000.

    An international crew of seven people live and work while traveling at a speed of five miles per second, orbiting Earth about every 90 minutes. Sometimes more are aboard the station during a crew handover.

    In 24 hours, the space station makes 16 orbits of Earth, traveling through 16 sunrises and sunsets.

    Peggy Whitson set the U.S. record for spending the most total time living and working in space at 665 days on Sept. 2, 2017.

    The acre of solar panels that power the station means sometimes you can look up in the sky at dawn or dusk and see the spaceship flying over your home, even if you live in a big city. Find sighting opportunities at http://spotthestation.nasa.gov.

    The living and working space in the station is larger than a six-bedroom house (and has six sleeping quarters, two bathrooms, a gym, and a 360-degree view bay window).

    To mitigate the loss of muscle and bone mass in the human body in microgravity, the astronauts work out at least two hours a day.

    Astronauts and cosmonauts regularly conduct spacewalks for space station construction, maintenance and upgrades.

    The solar array wingspan (356 feet, 109 meters) is longer than the world’s largest passenger aircraft, the Airbus A380 (262 feet, 80 meters).

    The large modules and other pieces of the station were delivered on 42 assembly flights, 37 on the U.S. space shuttles and five on Russian Proton/Soyuz rockets.

    The space station is 356 feet (109 meters) end-to-end, one yard shy of the full length of an American football field including the end zones.

    Eight miles of wire connects the electrical power system aboard the space station.

    The 55-foot robotic Canadarm2 has seven different joints and two end-effectors, or hands, and is used to move entire modules, deploy science experiments and even transport spacewalking astronauts.

    Eight spaceships can be connected to the space station at once.

    A spacecraft can arrive at the space station as soon as four hours after launching from Earth.

    Four different cargo spacecraft deliver science, cargo and supplies: Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus, SpaceX’s Dragon, JAXA’s HTV, and the Russian Progress.

    Through Expedition 60, the microgravity laboratory has hosted nearly 3,000 research investigations from researchers in more than 108 countries.

    The station’s orbital path takes it over 90 percent of the Earth’s population, with astronauts taking millions of images of the planet below. Check them out at https://eol.jsc.nasa.gov.

    More than 20 different research payloads can be hosted outside the station at once, including Earth sensing equipment, materials science payloads, particle physics experiments like the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 and more.

    The space station travels an equivalent distance to the Moon and back in about a day.

    The Water Recovery System reduces crew dependence on water delivered by a cargo spacecraft by 65 percent – from about 1 gallon a day to a third of a gallon.

    On-orbit software monitors approximately 350,000 sensors, ensuring station and crew health and safety.

    The space station has an internal pressurized volume equal that of a Boeing 747.

    More than 50 computers control the systems on the space station.

    More than 3 million lines of software code on the ground support more than 1.5 million lines of flight software code.

    In the International Space Station’s U.S. segment alone, more than 1.5 million lines of flight software code run on 44 computers communicating via 100 data networks transferring 400,000 signals (e.g. pressure or temperature measurements, valve positions, etc.).

    International Space Station Size & Mass

    Pressurized Module Length: 218 feet along the major axis (67 meters)

    Truss Length: 310 feet (94 meters)

    Solar Array Length: 239 feet across both longitudinally aligned arrays (73 meters)

    Mass: 925,335 pounds (419,725 kilograms)

    Habitable Volume: 13,696 cubic feet (388 cubic meters) not including visiting vehicles

    Pressurized Volume: 32,333 cubic feet (916 cubic meters)

    With BEAM expanded: 32,898 cubic feet (932 cubic meters)

    Power Generation: 8 solar arrays provide 75 to 90 kilowatts of power

    Lines of Computer Code: approximately 1.5 million

    Last Updated: Nov 4, 2021

    Editor: Mark Garcia

    Source : www.nasa.gov

    The 20 Most Frequently Asked Questions about the International Space Station

    THE 20 MOST FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION

    Published on October 23, 2020

    by Alicia facebook linkedin twitter google+ email

    As we celebrate the 20th anniversary of humans living and working in space aboard the International Space Station, you may ask, why? Why would humankind live and work in space? President Ronald Reagan answered this question best:

    “We can follow our dreams to distant stars, living and working in space for peaceful, economic, and scientific gain. … A space station will permit quantum leaps in our research in science, communications, in metals, and in lifesaving medicines which could be manufactured only in space. We want our friends to help us meet these challenges and share in their benefits.”

    Keep reading below to see the answers to more of the most frequently asked questions about this achievement in science and international cooperation.

    WHAT IS THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION?

    The International Space Station (ISS) is Earth’s only microgravity laboratory that has allowed more than 3,600 researchers in 106 countries to conduct more than 2,500 experiments – and the research continues. The space station is a symbol of international cooperation that has benefited life back on Earth economically, technologically, scientifically and educationally.

    CAN I SEE THE ISS FROM EARTH?

    At dawn or dusk you’ll be able to see the space station with your bare eyes as the third brightest object in the sky. It will also be moving across the sky, similar to an airplane, but without flashing lights. Track where the ISS is right now using NASA’s Spot The Station tool.

    WHAT DOES THE ISS LOOK LIKE?

    This photo of the ISS was taken in 2018 by Expedition 56 crew members from a Soyuz spacecraft undocking. Credit: NASA/Roscosmos

    The ISS is constructed of many connected modules called “nodes” connecting the station together. The solar arrays are connected to the station with a long truss, which controls the space station’s temperature. The ISS also has robotic arms mounted outside the station.

    HOW FAR AWAY IS THE ISS?

    The space station orbits Earth at an average altitude of 227 nautical miles/420 kilometers above Earth.

    HOW BIG IS THE ISS?

    The ISS measures 357 feet or 108 meters from end-to-end, which is about the size of an American football field. The space station has a mass of nearly 1 million pounds. When it comes to living in space, the ISS is larger than a six-bedroom house.

    HOW FAST DOES THE ISS TRAVEL?

    The ISS travels at about 17,500 miles/28,000 kilometers per hour. At this speed, the ISS orbits the Earth every 90 minutes, which gives the crew 16 sunrises and sunsets every day. Since humans have been living and working on the space station, it has orbited Earth tens of thousands of times.

    HOW OLD IS THE ISS? HOW LONG HAS IT BEEN OPERATIONAL?

    Plans for the ISS first began 36 years ago when President Ronald Reagan directed NASA to develop a permanently internationally crewed space station. Over 20 years ago, in 1998, the first modules of the ISS were launched into space. Now in November 2020, the ISS will celebrate 20 years of humankind permanently occupying the space station.

    HOW MANY COUNTRIES ARE INVOLVED IN THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION?

    The partnership of five space agencies representing 15 countries provide for and operate the ISS. These countries include the United States, Russia, Canada, Japan and the participating countries of the European Space Agency.

    HOW WAS THE ISS BUILT?

    Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, is anchored to the extended ISS’s Canadarm-2 during a spacewalk to repair the Control moment Gyroscopes. Credit: NASA

    Constructing the ISS was a joint mission over the course of 13 years by many countries including the United States, Russia, Japan and Europe. Different modules of the ISS were constructed on Earth by thousands of engineers and launched by Russia’s Proton rocket and the United States’ space shuttles.

    Fun Fact: Space shuttle Atlantis on display at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex delivered the U.S. laboratory module Destiny along with many other vital components.

    WHO IS ON THE ISS?

    As of mid-October 2020, six astronauts are aboard the ISS. Keep up to date with who is on the station at NASA ISS webpage. Four astronauts are preparing to launch soon on a SpaceX Crew Dragon, including NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover, Shannon Walker and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi. Learn more about this launch and other upcoming launches on the launch calendar.

    HOW LONG DO ASTRONAUTS STAY ON THE ISS?

    Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA) prepares her dinner. Credit: NASA

    Source : www.kennedyspacecenter.com

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