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    how do the details in this passage support the authors’ purpose? the authors include details about how much sugar americans consume to persuade readers that modern diets are unhealthy. the authors include details about the changes in diets over time to inform readers about how sugar has transformed what we eat. the authors include details about how much sugar people have eaten over time to entertain readers with surprising statistics. the authors include details about american and british diets to persuade readers that eating habits now are healthier than they were in the past.

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    get how do the details in this passage support the authors’ purpose? the authors include details about how much sugar americans consume to persuade readers that modern diets are unhealthy. the authors include details about the changes in diets over time to inform readers about how sugar has transformed what we eat. the authors include details about how much sugar people have eaten over time to entertain readers with surprising statistics. the authors include details about american and british diets to persuade readers that eating habits now are healthier than they were in the past. from EN Bilgi.

    How do the details in this passage support the authors’ purpose? the authors include details about how much sugar americans consume to persuade readers that modern diets are unhealthy. the authors include details about the changes in diets over time to inform readers about how sugar has transformed what we eat. the authors include details about how much sugar people have eaten over time to entertain readers with surprising statistics. the authors include details about american and british diets to persuade readers that eating habits now are healthier than they were in the past.

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    JUNE 17, 2021 BY JOHN NEWTON

    How do the details in this passage support the authors’ purpose? the authors include details about how much sugar americans consume to persuade readers that modern diets are unhealthy. the authors include details about the changes in diets over time to inform readers about how sugar has transformed what we eat. the authors include details about how much sugar people have eaten over time to entertain readers with surprising statistics. the authors include details about american and british diets to persuade readers that eating habits now are healthier than they were in the past.

    How do the details in this passage support the authors’ purpose? Starting around 1800, sugar became the staple food that allowed the English factories—the most advanced economies in the world—to run. Sugar supplied the energy, the hint of nutrition, the sweet taste to go with the warmth of tea that even the poorest factory worker could look forward to. Sugar was a necessity.

    Why were the English the first to build factories to mill cloth? Because of the wealth they gained, the trade connections they made, and the banking systems they developed in the slave and sugar trade. Indeed, the cheap cloth from the factories was used to clothe the slaves. English factories, you might say, were built, run, and paid for by sugar.

    In 1800, when the English were consuming their eighteen pounds of sugar a year, around 250,000 tons of sugar were produced worldwide—almost all sent to Europe. A century later, in 1900, when sugar was used in jams, cakes, syrups, and tea, and every modern country was filled with factories, world production of sugar reached six million tons. By that time, the average person in England ate ninety pounds of sugar a year—and in the early twentieth century, that number kept rising. (Americans today eat only about 40 pounds of cane sugar a year, but that is because other forms of sweeteners, such as corn syrup, are now cheaper than cane sugar. If you consider all forms of sweeteners, Americans eat an average of 140 pounds every year.)

    A. The authors include details about how much sugar Americans consume to persuade readers that modern diets are unhealthy.

    B. The authors include details about the changes in diets over time to inform readers about how sugar has transformed what we eat.

    C. The authors include details about how much sugar people have eaten over time to entertain readers with surprising statistics.

    D. The authors include details about American and British diets to persuade readers that eating habits now are healthier than they were in the past.

    Answer: The correct answer is the authors include details about the changes in diets over time to inform readers about how sugar has transformed what we eat..

    Source : www.imlearningmath.com

    Healthy Fast Food

    Learn how to make healthier fast food choices and keep calories down on the go.

    healthy eating

    Healthy Fast Food

    Healthy Fast Food Finding a healthy, well-balanced meal in a fast food restaurant can be a challenge. But here’s how to find healthier options hidden among the diet disasters.

    Is there such a thing as healthy fast food?

    The truth is that it’s extremely difficult to follow a healthy diet when you’re eating regularly at fast food restaurants. Fast food is typically loaded with calories, sodium, and unhealthy fat—often enough in one meal for an entire day. It also tends to be low in nutrients and almost totally lacking in fruit, vegetables, and fiber.

    That doesn’t mean you have to avoid fast food entirely. When you’re hungry and on the run, fast food can really hit the spot. It’s cheap, tasty, and, best of all, convenient. But while it’s okay to indulge a craving every now and then, to stay healthy you can’t make it a regular habit. The key is moderation—both in how often you frequent fast food chains and what you order once you’re there.

    Fast food menus are tricky when you’re watching your weight or your health. Finding a healthy, well-balanced meal in most fast food restaurants is a challenge. But there are always choices you can make that are healthier than others. The following tips and menu recommendations can help you stay on track.

    Aim to keep your entire meal to 500 calories or less. The average adult eats 836 calories per fast food meal-and underestimates what they ate by 175 calories. So don’t guess! Most chains post nutritional info both on their websites and at the franchise location. Take advantage of this information.Opt for foods that are lower in fat and higher in protein and fiber. Look for items with more good stuff, like fiber, whole grains, and high-quality protein. Also aim for options that are relatively low in saturated fats. And steer clear of all items that contain trans fats.Bring your own add-on items if you really want a health boost. Even when you order wisely, it can be pretty tough to get enough fiber and other important vitamins and nutrients from a fast food menu. If you plan ahead, you can bring healthy sides and toppings like dried fruit, nuts and seeds, carrot sticks, apple or pear slices, and cottage cheese or yogurt.

    Watch your sodium intake

    High sodium intake is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association recommends that adults stay under 1500 mg of sodium per day, and never take in more than 2,300 mg a day. Unfortunately, that’s tough to do when eating fasting food, even when you’re eating lower calorie meals. Your best bet: plan ahead if possible and eat low sodium in the meals leading up to and following your fast food meal. However, you can minimize some of the damage by requesting that your burger or meat be cooked without added salt.

    Guides can help you make healthier choices

    Many fast food chains post nutritional information on their websites. Sometimes, these lists are confusing and hard to use, but they are the best source for accurate, up-to-date information on your menu options. There are also many other websites and apps that provide nutritional information, often in easier to use formats.

    Making healthier fast food choices on the go

    Making healthier fast food choices is easier if you plan ahead by checking the nutritional guides that most chains post on their websites. But if you don’t have the chance to prepare, you can still make smarter choices by following a few common sense guidelines.

    Healthier fast food ordering guidelines

    Keep your eye on portion size. Many fast food meals deliver enough food for several meals in the guise of a single serving. Avoid supersized and value-sized items, and go for the smallest size when it comes to sandwiches, burgers, and sides. You can also find more reasonable portions on the children’s menu.Focus on grilled or roasted lean meats. Avoid fried and breaded items, such as crispy chicken sandwiches and breaded fish fillets. Choose turkey, chicken breast, lean ham, or lean roast beef instead. Grilled skinless chicken is usually your best bet.Pay attention to the descriptions on the menu. Dishes labeled deep-fried, pan-fried, basted, batter-dipped, breaded, creamy, crispy, scalloped, or au gratin are usually high in calories, unhealthy fats, and sodium. Same with items in Alfredo or cream sauce.Don’t be afraid to special order. Many menu items can be made healthier with a few tweaks and substitutions. For example, you can ask to hold the sauce or dressing or serve it on the side. Or you can request a wheat bun for your hamburger or whole-grain bread for your sandwich.Don’t assume that healthy-sounding dishes are always your best option. For example, many fast food salads are a diet minefield, smothered in high-fat dressing and fried toppings. This is where reading the nutrition facts before you order can make a huge difference.

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    Obesity and the Western Diet: How We Got Here

    Mo Med. 2020 Nov-Dec; 117(6): 536–538.

    PMCID: PMC7721435 PMID: 33311784

    Obesity and the Western Diet: How We Got Here

    Varundeep Rakhra, DO, Suguni Loku Galappaththy, MD, Sheetal Bulchandani, MD, and Peminda K. Cabandugama, MD

    Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer

    This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

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    Introduction

    Through the course of the last several decades, the rate of obesity has progressively increased and is now one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The World Health Organization reports 1.9 billion adults were overweight in 2016 and 650 million were considered obese.1 According to the Center for Disease Control, the prevalence of obesity in the United States was 30.5% in 1999. This increased to 42.4% by 2017.2 In conjunction with this, chronic illnesses associated with obesity such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease are now among the top causes of death in the United States.3 In 2008, the medical cost for obesity was $147 billion. This was $1,429 higher than the cost for non-obese patients.2

    Several factors have been attributed to this epidemic with the western diet considered to be a major contributor to the growing rate of obesity in the United States. Although current lifestyle trends emphasize the importance of eating healthy, we continue to see foods high in fat and sugar as major components of the Western diet which has corresponded to the steady rise in obesity. The management of obesity is therefore an important discussion with many now acknowledging that diet modification would have the greatest impact on this growing epidemic.

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    What We Should Eat

    The recommended daily caloric intake depends on an individual’s age, gender, and level of physical activity.3 Weight gain occurs when more calories are consumed than expended. Healthy weight loss can be achieved with a daily caloric intake of 1,200–1,500 for women and 1,500–1,800 for men.4 The U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and Agriculture (USDA) have released the Dietary Guidelines for 2015 to 2020.4 This plan encourages a diet rich in nutrients while limiting calories from added sugars, saturated and trans fats, and sodium.5 Added sugars and saturated fats should each contribute less than 10% of the daily caloric intake.5 The American Heart Association recommends that women consume less than 6 teaspoons of sugar daily and men consume less than 9 teaspoons of sugar daily.3 Finally, the recommended daily sodium intake should be less than 2,300 mg.5

    A healthy diet should include foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat dairy (Figure 1).4 A 2,000 calorie diet should consist of 2.5 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit daily. Protein can be obtained from seafood, lean meat, chicken, legumes, and nuts. Whole grains such as brown rice, quinoa, and oats are also suggested. The USDA dietary guidelines recommend adults consume three cups of non-fat or low-fat dairy per day.4 Eating a healthy diet not only results in weight loss, it can decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease.

    Figure 1 USDA My Pyramid

    2005: MyPyramid Food Guidance System; U.S. Department of Agriculture.

    ChooseMyPlate https://www.choosemyplate.gov/eathealthy/brief-history-usda-food-guides

    The DASH diet is a well-known diet that encourages more fruits and vegetables.6 It avoids foods high in sodium, fats, and sugars. In fact, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension study found that a diet low in fat and rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy resulted in lower systolic and diastolic blood pressures when compared to a standard western diet.6

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    What is the Western “American” Diet?

    The typical Western (American) diet is low in fruits and vegetables, and high in fat and sodium. Moreover, this diet consists of large portions, high calories, and excess sugar.3 This excess sugar accounts for more than 13% of the daily caloric intake with beverages constituting 47% of these added sugars.4 Other sources include cookies, cakes, and candy.

    Although fruits and vegetables contain natural sugars, they provide nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants while added sugars only contribute calories.3 The western diet is also noted to be high in saturated and trans fats. These fats not only contribute more calories; they increase low-density lipoproteins leading to atherosclerosis.

    There has recently been increasing interest in the effect of dietary patterns on the immune system. One study compared mice that were fed a western diet to mice that were fed a standard fiber-rich diet.7 The western diet consisted of foods high in fats and sugars and low in fiber. These mice were found to have higher levels of inflammation and sepsis resulting in worse outcomes.7

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    The True Cost of Obesity and the Western Diet

    Individuals who are obese or overweight are at a higher risk of developing chronic illnesses such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, sleep apnea, or cancer. In fact, half of all Americans have a preventable chronic illness.3 According to the American Heart Association, 81 million American adults have cardiovascular disease which includes coronary artery disease or cerebrovascular disease. One-third of American adults have hypertension and more than 85% of patients with type 2 diabetes are considered overweight.3

    Source : www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

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