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    how do ocean currents affect temperature? check all that apply. they carry cold water from the poles to the equator and cool air over land. they flow north and then south below the equator. they flow south and then north above the equator. they move warm water from the equator to the poles and heat air over land. they move east to west and create prevailing winds. they move west to east and create seasonal winds.

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    get how do ocean currents affect temperature? check all that apply. they carry cold water from the poles to the equator and cool air over land. they flow north and then south below the equator. they flow south and then north above the equator. they move warm water from the equator to the poles and heat air over land. they move east to west and create prevailing winds. they move west to east and create seasonal winds. from EN Bilgi.

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    SCIENCE BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY EARTH SCIENCE

    Maddie D. asked • 06/27/21

    URGENT- Please help me with this earth science question.

    How do ocean currents affect temperature? Check all that apply.

    They carry cold water from the poles to the equator and cool air over land.

    They flow north and then south below the equator.

    They flow south and then north above the equator.

    They move warm water from the equator to the poles and heat air over land.

    They move east to west and create prevailing winds.

    They move west to east and create seasonal winds.

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    1 Expert Answer

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    Stanton D. answered • 06/27/21

    TUTOR 4.6 (42)

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    Hi Maddie D.,

    You will find, as you read your physical science textbook??, that #1-4 are true. These are just general statements about what ocean currents do -- carry "cold" from the poles towards the equator, and "heat" from the equator towards the poles. The global and seasonal wind patterns -- those aren't directly driven by ocean currents. You SHOULD be able to reason that out, since seasonal winds change with the seasons, but ocean currents are constant year-round. And by now you SHOULD know that the global wind zones are set up by air trying to do the same thing, but complicated by moisture, and by getting deflected by the Coriolus Force. You SHOULD be able to visualize the Earth in space, spinning the correct direction, and follow the winds from the N pole into the first Coriolus turn. And you should just memorize, perhaps, the pattern of the winds from that as a reference. (i.e. from the N pole, zones at ground level blow E, W, E as you go towards the Equator. And the same in the S hemisphere.)

    Otherwise -- why the global wind patterns break up into 3 zones in each (N/S) hemisphere -- for that, you have to learn why air rises (it's moist) or falls (it drops moisture thus becoming dry), and where that happens (there's two bands on Earth where most of that moisture drops out of the air!). So you have to keep track of Coriolus force, and air moisture and whether air moves first high or low in each zone. If you do follow that, and learn the why's, then you can re-create the global wind patterns yourself at any time. Such as for a cumulative test --

    -- Cheers, -- Mr. d.

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    Do currents affect temperature? – SidmartinBio

    MISCELLANEOUS

    Do currents affect temperature?

    Esther FlemingDecember 18, 2019

    Table of Contents

    Do currents affect temperature?

    H

    ow do ocean currents alter temperature? Ocean currents help move heat around the globe while absorbing and retaining the heat from the sun to keep the Earth warm and more evenly distribute the warmth from the sun.

    How do cold currents affect climate?

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    Cold ocean currents are large masses of cold water that move towards the equator, from a level of high altitude to lower levels. They absorb the heat they receive in the tropics, thereby cooling the air above them.

    What are warm and cold ocean currents?

    We can divide ocean currents into two categories based on temperature: warm and cold currents. Think of cold currents as currents moving toward the Equator. These waters are colder than the water they are moving into. A warm current is moving away from the Equator toward the poles.

    What weather does warm ocean currents bring?

    Warming temperatures transported by ocean currents can promote atmospheric instability and the potential for precipitation and storms. This is the case for air masses over the western boundary currents of the North Pacific and North Atlantic gyres, the Kuroshio and Gulf Stream, respectively.

    How do ocean currents affect the earth’s temperature?

    How do ocean currents affect temperature? Check all that apply. They carry cold water from the poles to the equator and cool air over land. They flow north and then south below the equator. They flow south and then north above the equator. They move warm water from the equator to the poles and heat air over land.

    How are warm currents different from cold currents?

    Warm currents are masses of warm water with higher temperatures moving away from the equator. Warm currents are formed when the cold saline water becomes dense and sinks allowing the light warm water to flow in the opposite direction, usually far from the equator. How Do Ocean Currents Affect Climate?

    What happens if there are no currents in the ocean?

    Without currents in the ocean, regional temperatures would be more extreme—super hot at the equator and frigid toward the poles—and much less of Earth’s land would be habitable.

    How are ocean currents related to seasonal winds?

    They flow north and then south below the equator. They flow south and then north above the equator. They move warm water from the equator to the poles and heat air over land. They move east to west and create prevailing winds. They move west to east and create seasonal winds.

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    Source : www.sidmartinbio.org

    Ocean Currents

    Ocean currents are like vast rivers, flowing along predictable paths.

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    Ocean Currents

    Ocean currents are like vast rivers, flowing along predictable paths.

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    Ocean water is constantly moving, and not only in the form of waves and tides. Ocean currents flow like vast rivers, sweeping along predictable paths. Some ocean currents flow at the surface; others flow deep within water. Some currents flow for short distances; others cross entire ocean basins and even circle the globe.

    By moving heat from the equator toward the poles, ocean currents play an important role in controlling the climate. Ocean currents are also critically important to sea life. They carry nutrients and food to organisms that live permanently attached in one place, and carry reproductive cells and ocean life to new places.

    Rivers flow because of gravity. What makes ocean currents flow?

    Tides contribute to coastal currents that travel short distances. Major surface ocean currents in the open ocean, however, are set in motion by the wind, which drags on the surface of the water as it blows. The water starts flowing in the same direction as the wind.

    But currents do not simply track the wind. Other things, including the shape of the coastline and the seafloor, and most importantly the rotation of the Earth, influence the path of surface currents.

    In the Northern Hemisphere, for example, predictable winds called trade winds blow from east to west just above the equator. The winds pull surface water with them, creating currents. As these currents flow westward, the Coriolis effect—a force that results from the rotation of the Earth—deflects them. The currents then bend to the right, heading north. At about 30 degrees north latitude, a different set of winds, the westerlies, push the currents back to the east, producing a closed clockwise loop.

    The same thing happens below the equator, in the Southern Hemisphere, except that here the Coriolis effect bends surface currents to the left, producing a counter-clockwise loop.

    Large rotating currents that start near the equator are called subtropical gyres. There are five main gyres: the North and South Pacific Subtropical Gyres, the North and South Atlantic Subtropical Gyres, and the Indian Ocean Subtropical Gyre.

    These surface currents play an important role in moderating climate by transferring heat from the equator towards the poles. Subtropical gyres are also responsible for concentrating plastic trash in certain areas of the ocean.

    In contrast to wind-driven surface currents, deep-ocean currents are caused by differences in water density. The process that creates deep currents is called thermohaline circulation—“thermo” referring to temperature and “haline” to saltiness.

    It all starts with surface currents carrying warm water north from the equator. The water cools as it moves into higher northern latitudes, and the more it cools, the denser it becomes.

    In the North Atlantic Ocean, near Iceland, the water becomes so cold that sea ice starts to form. The salt naturally present in seawater does not become part of the ice, however. It is left behind in the ocean water that lies just under the ice, making that water extra salty and dense. The denser water sinks, and as it does, more ocean water moves in to fill the space it once occupied. This water also cools and sinks, keeping a deep current in motion.

    This is the start of what scientists call the “global conveyor belt,” a system of connected deep and surface currents that moves water around the globe. These currents circulate around the globe in a thousand-year cycle.

    circulation

    Noun

    moving in a circular motion.

    coastline

    Noun

    outer boundary of a shore.

    Coriolis effect

    Noun

    the result of Earth's rotation on weather patterns and ocean currents. The Coriolis effect makes storms swirl clockwise in the Southern hemisphere and counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere.

    current

    Noun

    steady, predictable flow of fluid within a larger body of that fluid.

    gravity

    Noun

    physical force by which objects attract, or pull toward, each other.

    nutrient

    Noun

    substance an organism needs for energy, growth, and life.

    ocean

    Noun

    large body of salt water that covers most of the Earth.

    ocean gyre

    Noun

    an area of ocean that slowly rotates in an enormous circle.

    reproductive cells

    Noun

    cell that has the sole function of assisting in the generation of offspring

    thermohaline circulation

    Noun

    ocean conveyor belt system in which water moves between the cold depths and warm surface in oceans throughout the world.

    Source : www.nationalgeographic.org

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