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    [Answer] Hatch, New Mexico, is famous for what vegetable?

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    [Answer] Hatch, New Mexico, is famous for what vegetable?

    Step 1 : Introduction to the question "Hatch, New Mexico, is famous for what vegetable?"

    ...1. Shiitake mushrooms 2. Green chile peppers 3. Pumpkins 4. Artichokes

    Step 2 : Answer to the question "Hatch, New Mexico, is famous for what vegetable?"

    Green chile peppers - If you’re having Thanksgiving dinner in the town of Hatch, New Mexico, you’ll very likely find the town’s namesake chiles mixed into traditional dishes. This patch of the Rio Grande river valley is known for growing and harvesting the spicy-sweet peppers, which are often fire-roasted and added to everything from enchiladas to stews. Hatch chiles are an essential part of New Mexico food culture and are enjoyed all year-round — even McDonald’s in New Mexico has incorporated it into their cheeseburgers. But the chiles have become a particular highlight of Thanksgiving dinners, included in everything from corn puddings to stuffing to mashed potatoes. :

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    By Try3Steps - November 23, 2021

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    Organic Hatch Chile: New Mexico’s Prized State Vegetable Hits Peak Season

    The chile roasters are out in New Mexico and nearby states as Hatch chile season is in full swing. “This is my favorite time of year—the air is thick with the smell of roasting chilies,” says Jennifer Knapp, value chain specialist for La Montañita Co-op Food Market, a four-store cooperative grocer in New Mexico that sells and distributes fresh organic Hatch.

    OPN CONNECT NEWSLETTER 234 · SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

    Organic Hatch Chile: New Mexico’s Prized State Vegetable Hits Peak Season

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    The chile roasters are out in New Mexico and nearby states as Hatch chile season is in full swing. “This is my favorite time of year—the air is thick with the smell of roasting chilies,” says Jennifer Knapp, value chain specialist for La Montañita Co-op Food Market, a four-store cooperative grocer in New Mexico that sells and distributes fresh organic Hatch.

    Jennifer Knapp, Value Chain Specialist, La Montañita Co-op Food Market

    “People associate [Hatch] green chile with New Mexico—as they should! It is our state vegetable,” says Knapp. “No other pepper tastes like green chile. … The smell, the flavor, the look—all unique to this land. Everyone in New Mexico gets so excited when they see the roasters starting to come out. The smell of green chile roasting is intoxicating.” 

    Hatch peppers are grown in the Hatch Valley, a region along the Rio Grande in southern New Mexico, and they comprise multiple chile varieties—including NuMex Big Jim, NuMex Sandia, NuMex Joe Parker, and many more. Usually sold as green chilies when they’re fresh, Hatch have an earthy taste and different levels of heat depending on the variety. When left on the vine for longer, Hatch peppers become red, and these are primarily sold in dried form. (Ristras, or strings of dried red chilies, are iconic to New Mexico.) “No other pepper tastes like green chile. … The smell, the flavor, the look—all unique to this land. Everyone in New Mexico gets so excited when they see the roasters starting to come out. The smell of green chile roasting is intoxicating.” – Jennifer Knapp

    “Green chile is generally only available for about two months of the year if we are lucky,” says Knapp, noting that the typical window is from roughly mid-August to early October.

    La Montañita Co-op, which has its own distribution center, sources its fresh organic Hatch peppers from Seco Spice, a grower in the Hatch Valley that processes more than one million pounds of fresh green chile annually.

    Hatch red chile ristra

    “As a century-old farming family, we like to think we know why our New Mexico chile tastes better than any other chile grown in the USA or across the world,” says Seco Spice on its website. “We firmly believe that chile grown in New Mexico tastes better in much the same way that the French wine regions believe they make the finest wines. ... Our products are the best because of our heritage, our water, our air, and our local soil.”

    In 2020, La Montañita sold 70 percent of its fresh organic Hatch through its four stores, and the rest was sold via its Albuquerque-based distribution center to external customers, including Veritable Vegetable, Whole Foods, local restaurants, and other co-ops and independent grocers in New Mexico.

    “We firmly believe that chile grown in New Mexico tastes better in much the same way that the French wine regions believe they make the finest wines. ... Our products are the best because of our heritage, our water, our air, and our local soil.” – Seco Spice

    “Once a year, we [also] always have some Colorado customers calling for a pick up,” adds Knapp. “I think they know that Pueblo, Colorado chile just cannot beat Hatch grown. (These are fightin’ words, by the way.)”

    Veritable Vegetable has been carrying fresh organic Hatch since 2017. The San Francisco-based distributor purchases hot and medium chilies from La Montañita and sells them to independent retail grocers.

    “They have such a unique flavor when roasted. They are the perfect balance of heat and sweetness and are a great addition to so many dishes,” says Qiana Cameron, a buyer for Veritable Vegetable. “Our sales doubled from 2019 to 2020. … This could be from all the experimental ‘cheffing’ that has gone on during the pandemic. Whatever the reason, we hope this trend continues!” 

    Qiana Cameron, Buyer, Veritable Vegetable

    “When I was a produce manager, customers would start asking in June, ‘When is the chile coming?!’ even though they knew it was still a couple months away,” says Knapp. “People just can’t get enough of it, and I don’t blame them! I honestly can’t imagine life without it.”

    Source : www.organicproducenetwork.com

    New Mexico chile

    New Mexico chile

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to navigation Jump to search New Mexico chile

    Species

    Cultivar group New Mexico[1]

    Marketing names Hatch chile, green chile, red chile, Anaheim pepper

    Breeder Dr. Fabián García

    Origin New Mexico Heat Hot

    Scoville scale 0–100,000[2] SHU

    New Mexico chile or New Mexican chile (Scientific name: 'New Mexico Group'; Spanish: ,[3] [4]) is a cultivar group[5] of the chile pepper from the US state of New Mexico, first grown by Pueblo and Hispano communities throughout Santa Fe de Nuevo México.[6] These landrace chile plants were used to develop the modern New Mexico chile peppers by horticulturist Dr. Fabián García and his students, including Dr. Roy Nakayama,[7] at what is now New Mexico State University in 1894.[8][9] New Mexico chile, which typically grows from a green to a ripened red, is popular in the cuisines of the Southwestern United States, including Sonoran and Arizonan cuisine, and an integral staple of New Mexican cuisine. It is also sometimes featured in the broader Mexican cuisine.[10] Chile is one of New Mexico's state vegetables, and is referenced in the New Mexico state question "Red or Green?".[11]Hatch chile is a label for New Mexico chile grown in the Hatch Valley, in and around Hatch, New Mexico, which has large acerages dedicated to the crop.[12] It is an important crop to New Mexico's economy and culture,[6][13] and it is sold worldwide including Europe, Australia, and Japan.[14][15]

    New Mexico green chile flavor has been described as lightly pungent similar to an onion, or like garlic with a subtly sweet, spicy, crisp, and smoky taste.[16] The ripened red retains the flavor, but adds an earthiness and bite while aging mellows the front-heat and delivers more of a back-heat.[17][18] The spiciness depends on the variety of New Mexico chile pepper.[19]

    Contents

    1 History 2 Cultivation

    2.1 Grown in New Mexico

    2.1.1 Hatch chile 2.1.2 Pueblo chile

    2.2 Outside of New Mexico

    2.2.1 California 2.2.2 Colorado 2.2.3 Outer space 3 Uses 3.1 Food 3.2 Art 3.3 Industry 4 Economy 4.1 Harvest

    4.2 New Mexico Certified Chile

    5 Cultural impact

    5.1 "Chile" versus "chili"

    5.2 Roasting season

    6 Cultivars and landraces

    7 In popular culture

    8 References 9 External links

    History[edit]

    Many types of chile plants were first grown by Pueblo residents, who continue to grow their own strains; each with a distinct pungency, sweetness, taste, and heat. For example, Zia Pueblo chile has a bitter-sweet flavor when it matures into its red color. When the Spanish arrived, they introduced European cultivation techniques to the chile plants, and eventually created cultivars in their towns.[20]

    The New Mexican type cultivars were developed by pioneer horticulturist Dr. Fabián García,[6][21] whose major release was the 'New Mexico No. 9' in 1913.[22] Earlier work was done by Emelio Ortega (see section "Anaheim Pepper" below). These cultivars are "hotter" than others to suit the tastes of New Mexicans in their traditional foods. Selective breeding began with 14 lineages of 'Pasilla', 'Colorado', and 'Negro' cultivars, from throughout New Mexico and Southern Colorado. These first commercially viable peppers were created to have a "larger, smoother, fleshier, more tapering and shoulderless pod for canning purposes."[23]

    Internationally renowned expert on chile genetics, breeding, and germplasm evaluation, Paul Bosland, founded the Chile Pepper Institute at New Mexico State University to study New Mexico's iconic state vegetable and peppers from around the world.[24]

    Cultivation[edit]

    Fruits of New Mexico chile plants are grown from seeds – and each of the individual strains is specifically bred and grown to be disease-resistant and provide consistent and healthy plants within their specific regions. Altitude, climate, soil, and acreage affects a crop's taste and heartiness, making the New Mexican region unique for plant propagation. The Rio Grande bosque, mountains, and high deserts provide the appropriate regional environment for growing chile. To ensure that a variety's lineage remains disease-resistant and maintains optimal growth within its heritage region, seeds from specific plants are carefully selected. An example of a New Mexican chile grown outside the state is the 'Anaheim' pepper which is extremely resilient in multiple altitudes. A quirky aspect of the New Mexico chile plants regards reintroducing seeds from their heritage soil since each successive generation becomes susceptible to disease and it loses its flavor. Therefore, chile farmers usually order seeds from their heritage soils, every few generations, to reinvigorate their crop. This allows New Mexico chile growers to perpetuate successful productions.[25][26][27]

    Grown in New Mexico[edit]

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

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