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    Welcome to Florida Department of Environmental Protection

    The Florida Department of Environmental Protection is the state's lead agency for environmental management and stewardship, protecting our air, water and land

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    Florida Department of Environmental Protection

    Protecting Florida Together

    The Governor’s Executive Order directs strategic action with a focus on accountability, transparency and collaboration, and we must work together to take action to restore and protect the environment.

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    Air

    Air quality monitoring • Air emission permitting and compliance • Power plant, transmission line and natural gas pipeline certification

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    Lands

    Buy, sell and lease state lands • Land management and conservation programs • Florida Forever

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    Parks & Rec

    State parks, trails, aquatic preserves and national estuarine research reserves • Ecotourism

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    Waste

    Solid and hazardous waste permitting and compliance • Petroleum storage systems • State recycling program • Contaminated site cleanup

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    Water

    State water policy • Water resources permitting and compliance • Water quality standards and restoration plans • Grant and loan programs

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    About DEP

    Mission • Vision and goals • Office of the Secretary • Organization chart • Performance dashboard • Career opportunities

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    Document Resource Hub

    The Document Resource Hub Search includes publications and forms available to the public that are stored on DEP’s website.

    Additional resources, including DEP’s historical documentation is available on OCULUS, DEP's Electronic Management System.

    Or try DEP's Enterprise Information Portal for access to more information including mapping and document links.

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    The Florida Department of Environmental Protection is the state’s lead agency for environmental management and stewardship – protecting our air, water and land. The vision of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection is to create strong community partnerships, safeguard Florida’s natural resources and enhance its ecosystems.

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    3900 Commonwealth Boulevard

    Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000 [email protected] 850-245-2118

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    Source : floridadep.gov

    Florida Department of Environmental Protection

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    Florida Department of Environmental Protection

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    Florida Department of Environmental Protection

    Agency overview Preceding agencies

    Florida Department of Environmental Regulation

    Florida Department of Natural Resources

    Jurisdiction State of Florida

    Employees 4200 (2021)

    Annual budget US$1.44 billion (FY15–16)

    Agency executive

    Shawn Hamilton, Secretary

    Website www.floridadep.gov

    The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) is the Florida government agency responsible for environmental protection.

    Contents

    1 History

    1.1 Bureau of Park Patrol

    2 Functions and responsibilities

    2.1 Everglades Restoration

    2.2 Global warming 3 Budget and staff 4 Organization 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

    History[edit]

    Marjory Stoneman Douglas Building in Tallahassee, the largest of the agency's headquarters buildings.

    By the mid-1960s, when the federal government was becoming increasingly involved in initiatives designed to protect the country's environmental interests, Florida had four agencies involved with environmental protection: the Florida Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund (state land, including shores, beaches, wetlands, and bodies of water), the Department of Health (sewage treatment, drinking water quality), Florida Department of Natural Resources (state parks and recreation areas), and Game and Freshwater Fish Commission (hunting and fishing).[1]

    In the late 1960s, the Florida Department of Air and Water Pollution Control was created under Governor Claude R. Kirk, Jr. Most staff were being taken from the Bureau of Sanitary Engineering of the state Department of Health. The name of the new agency was simplified to the Florida Department of Pollution Control.[]

    In the mid-1970s, the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation (FDER) was created from the Department of Pollution Control and portions of the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund and the Florida Department of Natural Resources. This revised agency was entrusted with the quality of the state's air and water, and with making major land management decisions, primarily related to shorelines and wetlands.[]

    The FDER began supervising five water management districts that had been established in 1972 under Chapter 373 of Florida Statutes to control all freshwater located in the state: The Suwannee River Water Management District, St. Johns River Water Management District, Southwest Florida Water Management District, South Florida Water Management District, and Northwest Florida Water Management District.[]

    By 1992, it was the nation's third-largest such state agency, with 1,500 employees and a budget of some $650 million.[2] In the mid-1990s, the state merged the DER with the substantially larger Department of Natural Resources, creating the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.[]

    In 2004, it started the 'Southeast Florida Coral Reef Initiative', 6 years after a presidential order had instructed 7 states with reefs to develop roadmaps of conservation.[3]: 7

    During the period from 2000 to 2005, the department functioned with a staff of about 3,600 employees and its annual budget averaged $1.9 billion ($1,899,731,705).[]

    In 2011, DEP suspended its wetlands director "after she refused to approve a permit to a failed effort to sell off surplus park land" and Everglades scientists. Leading positions have been filled by prior consultants for developers and polluting industries in revolving door (politics). The regulatory climate has changed from "prosecuting violations to helping industry avoid fines".[4]

    Bureau of Park Patrol[edit]

    Until July 1, 2012, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) had a law enforcement contingent, referred to as the Division of Law Enforcement (DLE), which included sworn state law enforcement officers and special agents as well as emergency responders to hazardous materials incidents.[]

    The patrol bureau was divided into 4 districts: NE, NW, SE & SW. The approximately 90 sworn state officers assigned to the patrol bureau patrolled primarily state parks, state lands, state trails, wildlife management areas (WMAs), rivers, coastline and both the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. Officers utilized traditional patrol cars, 4x4 sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks, ATVs, boats, airboats, personal watercraft (PWC's), dirt-bikes, and bicycles. The headquarters occupied the fifth floor of the DEP main offices in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas building in Tallahassee, Florida.[] Officers of the patrol bureau were fully constituted law enforcement officers of the state and possessed statewide authority. Although dedicated primarily to the protection and conservation of state lands, parks, properties and bodies of water, officers took law enforcement action statewide.[]

    On July 1, 2012, the Bureau, which by that time had been renamed the Bureau of Park Police, was merged into the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the sworn officers, as well as reserve officers and support staff, were transferred to FWC. The Bureau of Emergency Response was not part of the merger and remained with DEP as the Office of Emergency Response.[]

    Source : en.wikipedia.org

    Department of Environmental Protection

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    What is the purpose of the department?

    The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) protects, conserves, and manages Florida's natural resources and enforces the state's environmental laws. DEP oversees and manages Florida's 175 state parks, more than 12 million acres of public lands and 4 million acres of coastal uplands and submerged lands. The department also manages environmentally sensitive land, for conservation and recreation, through the Florida Forever Program. In addition, the department administers all state-owned submerged lands under Florida's public trust doctrine and has general supervisory authority over the state's five water management districts-Northwest Florida, St. Johns River, South Florida, Southwest Florida, and Suwannee River.

    How is the department structured?

    The department's secretary is appointed by the Governor with the concurrence of the Cabinet and confirmed by the Florida Senate. The department is divided into three primary areas:  regulatory programs, land and recreation, and ecosystem restoration. The department also maintains six district offices throughout the state; these offices ensure statewide compliance with department rules.

    What are the department's regulatory programs?

    The department oversees several regulatory programs.

    The Division of Air Resources Management protects and manages Florida's air resource, including air quality monitoring, permitting, and compliance of emission sources.

    The Division of Water Resource Management implements state laws that protect the quality of Florida's water, rivers, lakes, estuaries and wetlands, and preservation of the state's beach and dune systems.

    The Division of Waste Management works to protect the environment from the improper handling and disposal of solid and hazardous wastes.

    The Florida Geological Survey collects, interprets, and provides information about Florida's water, mineral, and energy resources.

    The Division of Law Enforcement enforces environmental laws and responds to incidents with environmental impacts.

    Six regulatory district offices review permit applications, conduct inspections of permitted facilities, and conduct compliance assistance and enforcement activities.

    What are the department's land and recreation programs?

    The department's land and recreation programs acquire and protect lands for preservation and recreation.

    The Division of Recreation and Parks includes the Florida State Parks and the Office of Greenways and Trails.

    The Division of State Lands acquires lands for public protection and provides oversight for management of activities on more than 12 million acres of public lands.

    What are the department's ecosystem restoration programs?

    The department's ecosystem restoration programs protect and improve water quality and aquatic resources in Florida.

    The Office of Ecosystem Projects plays a key role in improving water quality and restoring the hydrology and ecology of America's Everglades.

    The Office of Resilience and Coastal Protection coordinates the protection of the state's coastal resources, including submerged lands and coastal uplands, aquatic preserves and national estuarine reserves, and coral reef resources.

    The Division of Environmental Assessment and Restoration monitors and assesses Florida's surface water and groundwater quality; develops strategies to resolve water quality issues; and implements those strategies in partnership with local stakeholders.

    The Division of Water Restoration Assistance provides grants and loans to local governments, utilities, and other agencies for projects that improve the quality and quantity of the state's water resources and benefit the environment and local communities.

    The Office of Water Policy addresses statewide water management issues in coordination with Florida's five water management districts and other agencies and partners.

    How are these activities funded?

    Fiscal Year: 2021-22

    Fund Dollars Positions

    ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF

    PROGRAM: ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

    EXECUTIVE DIRECTION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

    28,763,997 220.00

    FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    4,129,609 33.00

    OFFICE OF EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    15,814,925 6.00

    TECHNOLOGY AND INFORMATION SERVICES

    21,307,428 96.00

    PROGRAM: AIR RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

    AIR RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

    50,347,235 67.00

    UTILITIES SITING AND COORDINATION

    340,232 3.00

    PROGRAM: DISTRICT OFFICES

    REGULATORY DISTRICT OFFICES

    49,923,667 558.00

    PROGRAM: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

    WATER SCIENCE AND LABORATORY SERVICES

    66,599,897 199.00

    PROGRAM: ENVIRONMENTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT

    ENVIRONMENTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT

    2,286,957 20.00

    PROGRAM: RECREATION AND PARKS

    COASTAL AND AQUATIC MANAGED AREAS

    526,343,139 124.00

    STATE PARK OPERATIONS

    194,628,445 1,033.50

    PROGRAM: STATE LANDS

    LAND ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT

    478,627,784 127.00

    PROGRAM: WASTE MANAGEMENT

    WASTE MANAGEMENT 198,017,687 181.00

    PROGRAM: WATER POLICY AND ECOSYSTEMS RESTORATION

    WATER POLICY AND ECOSYSTEMS RESTORATION

    Source : oppaga.fl.gov

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