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    exposure to environmental hazards such as coal dust, silica dust, and asbestos may lead to pulmonary fibrosis or scarring of the lung tissue. with this condition the lungs become stiff and have less elasticity. what would happen to the total lung capacity and vital capacity under these conditions? explain your reasoning for your response.

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    get exposure to environmental hazards such as coal dust, silica dust, and asbestos may lead to pulmonary fibrosis or scarring of the lung tissue. with this condition the lungs become stiff and have less elasticity. what would happen to the total lung capacity and vital capacity under these conditions? explain your reasoning for your response. from EN Bilgi.

    Learn About Silicosis

    Approximately 2.3 million U.S. workers are exposed to silica in the workplace. Inhaling silica dust particles can permanently scar the lungs and lead to chronic breathing problems.

    Silicosis is an interstitial lung disease caused by breathing in tiny bits of silica, a common mineral found in many types of rock and soil. Over time, exposure to silica particles causes permanent lung scarring, called pulmonary fibrosis.

    Key Facts

    How It Affects Your Body?

    When people breathe silica dust, they inhale tiny particles of the mineral silica. Over time, the silica dust particles can cause lung inflammation that leads to the formation of lung nodules and scarring in the lungs called pulmonary fibrosis. This is a progressive disease that normally takes 10–30 years after first exposure to develop. Over time, lung capacity decreases, and people with silicosis particularly those with Progressive Massive Fibrosis may need support with oxygen and other devices to help them breathe.

    In some silicosis cases, this scarring can be so severe that it leads to a form of severe fibrosis, known as Progressive Massive Fibrosis (PMF). For these patients, extreme scarring and stiffening of the lung can make it difficult to breathe. Having silicosis also increases the risk of other health problems, including tuberculosis, lung cancer and chronic bronchitis.

    Who Is at Risk?

    Silica is the most abundant mineral in the earth’s crust. So, any occupation that involves chipping, cutting, drilling, or grinding soil, granite, slate, sandstone, or other natural material can cause exposure to silica dust. Some high-risk occupations are:

    Reviewed and approved by the American Lung Association Scientific and Medical Editorial Review Panel.

    Page last updated: March 23, 2020

    Learn About Silicosis

    Source : www.lung.org

    Occupational Lung Diseases

    Work-related lung diseases are lung problems that are made worse in certain work environments. They are caused by long-term exposure to certain irritants that are breathed into the lungs. These lung diseases may have lasting effects, even after the exposure ends.

    Occupational Lung Diseases

    What are work-related lung diseases?

    Work-related lung diseases are lung problems that are made worse in certain work environments. They are caused by long-term exposure to certain irritants that are breathed into the lungs. These lung diseases may have lasting effects, even after the exposure ends.

    Particles in the air from many sources cause these lung problems. These sources include factories, smokestacks, exhaust, fires, mining, construction, and agriculture. The smaller the particles are, the more damage they can do to the lungs. Smaller particles are easily inhaled deep into the lungs. There, they are absorbed into the body instead of being coughed out:

    What causes work-related lung diseases?

    Certain types of jobs put you at greater risk for this than others. For instance, working in a car garage or textile factory can expose you to unsafe chemicals, dusts, and fibers.

    Most work-related lung diseases are caused by repeated, long-term exposure. But even a severe, single exposure to an unsafe agent can damage the lungs.

    Smoking can make this condition worse.

    What are the symptoms of work-related lung diseases?

    Each person's symptoms may vary. Common symptoms of lung diseases include:

    The symptoms of work-related lung diseases may look like other health conditions or problems. Always talk with a healthcare provider for a diagnosis.

    How are work-related lung diseases diagnosed?

    These lung diseases, like other lung diseases, often need a chest X-ray for diagnosis. Tests that may be needed to figure out the type and severity of the lung disease include:

    Chest X-ray

    A test that takes pictures of internal tissues, bones, and organs.

    Pulmonary function tests

    These tests help measure the lungs' ability to move air into and out of the lungs. The tests are often done with special machines that you breathe into.

    Bronchoscopy

    This test uses a flexible tube called a bronchoscope to view the main airways of the lungs (the bronchi). Bronchoscopy helps to diagnose lung problems, look for blockages, take out tissue or fluid samples, or remove a foreign body. Bronchoscopy may include a biopsy or bronchoalveolar lavage.

    Blood gas

    This test measures the amount of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the blood. Other blood tests may be used to look for possible infections and other problems.

    CT scan

    This is an imaging test that uses X-rays and a computer to make detailed images of the body. A CT scan shows details of the bones, muscles, fat, and organs. CT scans are more detailed than regular X-rays. They can be used to diagnose lung diseases, watch disease progression, and evaluate response to treatment.

    How are work-related lung diseases treated?

    There is no cure for most work-related lung diseases. Treatments are aimed at:

    Treatment depends on the type of lung disease. There is no way to fix lung scarring that has already happened.

    Can work-related lung diseases be prevented?

    Work-related lung diseases are preventable. The best prevention is to stay away from the inhaled substances that cause lung problems. Other preventive measures include:

    An occupational health expert can assess a workplace for risks for work-related lung diseases. Employers can also protect workers by following safety and health regulations.

    Key points about work-related lung diseases

    Next steps

    Tips to help you get the most from a visit to your healthcare provider:

    Occupational Lung Diseases

    Source : www.cedars-sinai.org

    What are the Effects of Dust on the Lungs? : OSH Answers

    What are the lungs? What happens when we breathe in dust? What are the reactions of the lungs to dust?

    What happens when we breathe in dust?

    The lungs are protected by a series of defense mechanisms in different regions of the respiratory tract.

    When a person breathes in, particles suspended in the air enter the nose, but not all of them reach the lungs. The nose is an efficient filter. Most large particles are stopped in it, until they are removed mechanically by blowing the nose or sneezing.

    These tubes are called bronchi and bronchioles. All of these airways are lined by cells. The mucus they produce catches most of the dust particles. Tiny hairs called cilia, covering the walls of the air tubes, move the mucus upward and out into the throat, where it is either coughed up and spat out, or swallowed.

    The air reaches the tiny air sacs (alveoli) in the inner part of the lungs with any dust particles that avoided the defenses in the nose and airways. The air sacs are very important because through them, the body receives oxygen and releases carbon dioxide.

    Dust that reaches the sacs and the lower part of the airways where there are no cilia is attacked by special cells called macrophages. These are extremely important for the defense of the lungs. They keep the air sacs clean. Macrophages virtually swallow the particles. Then the macrophages, in a way which is not well understood, reach the part of the airways that is covered by cilia. The wavelike motions of the cilia move the macrophages which contain dust to the throat, where they are spat out or swallowed.

    Besides macrophages, the lungs have another system for the removal of dust. The lungs can react to the presence of germ-bearing particles by producing certain proteins. These proteins attach to particles to neutralize them.

    Dusts are tiny solid particles scattered or suspended in the air. The particles are "inorganic" or "organic," depending on the source of the dust. Inorganic dusts can come from grinding metals or minerals such as rock or soil. Examples of inorganic dusts are silica, asbestos, and coal.

    Organic dusts originate from plants or animals. An example of organic dust is dust that arises from handling grain. These dusts can contain a great number of substances. Aside from the vegetable or animal component, organic dusts may also contain fungi or microbes and the toxic substances given off by microbes. For example, histoplasmosis, psittacosis and Q Fever are diseases that people can get if they breathe in organic that are infected with a certain microorganisms.

    Dusts can also come from organic chemicals (e.g., dyes, pesticides). However, in this OSH Answers document, we are only considering dust particles that cause fibrosis or allergic reactions in the lungs. We are not including chemical dusts that cause other acute toxic effects, nor long term effects such as cancer for example.

    What are the Effects of Dust on the Lungs? : OSH Answers

    Source : www.ccohs.ca

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