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    10 fascinating facts about the Liberty Bell

    On July 8, 1776, popular legend says the Liberty Bell rang to symbolize America’s independence from Great Britain. But many “facts” about the Bell, such as the 1776 ringing, are shrouded in mystery.

    National Constitution Center

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    10 fascinating facts about the Liberty Bell

    July 8, 2021 by NCC Staff

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    On July 8, 1776, popular legend says the Liberty Bell rang to symbolize America’s independence from Great Britain. But many “facts” about the Bell, such as its 1776 ringing,  are shrouded in mystery.

    For example, how did the Liberty Bell get its famous crack? Did it really ring on July 4, 1776? And where was the Bell hidden from the British?

    Here are some of the facts we do know about the Liberty Bell, and some theories to answer the other big questions about the Bell’s travels.

    1. The Liberty Bell pre-dates the Revolution. The Pennsylvania Assembly had the Liberty Bell made in 1751 to mark the 50-year anniversary of William Penn's 1701 Charter of Privileges, which served as Pennsylvania's original Constitution.2. What is written on the Bell? The following Bible verse is on the Bell: “Proclaim Liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof." Also included is information about the Pennsylvania Assembly and the Bell’s maker.3. No one knows today when the Bell was cracked. The crack is a big subject of debate among historians. One theory is the Bell got its first crack in 1752 when it was tested upon its arrival in Philadelphia.4. The last big crack happened on Washington’s Birthday. The Liberty Bell cracked up, literally, in February 1846, when it was rung on President’s Day, celebrated on Washington’s birthday, and then stopped ringing because of damage from a major crack.5. The Liberty Bell rang often during its functional lifetime. Between 1753 and 1846, the Bell tolled for many people and occasions. It rang to mark the signing of the Constitution, and the deaths of Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Jefferson.

    6. The Liberty Bell wasn’t the first name of this icon. The bell was originally known as the State House Bell. In the late 1830s, it acquired the name of the Liberty Bell when it became a symbol of the anti-slavery movement.

    7. The bell probably didn’t ring on July 4, 1776. A magazine writer in 1847 made up the story of the bell ringing on the first Independence Day.8. The bell may also not have rung on July 8, 1776. It is known that bells in the city of Philadelphia were ringing to celebrate the public announcement of the Declaration of Independence. According to the Independence Hall Association, the statehouse steeple was under repair at the time, making it unlikely for the Liberty Bell to be in use. But with no contemporary accounts, we just don't know.9. The Bell did go on a Revolutionary road trip. In 1777, the Bell was removed from Philadelphia under armed guard and taken to Allentown, Pa., where it was hidden in a church. The fear was the British would melt the Bell and use it to make cannons. It came back to Philadelphia the following year.10. The Liberty Bell last hit the road in 1915. Back in the day, the Bell went on tour around the United States, but in the days before World War I, it became clear the Bell had condition issues. Today, it resides at the Liberty Bell Center in Philadelphia, where it is occasionally tapped to mark special occasions.

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    The Liberty Bell

    The Liberty Bell is one of history's most famous symbols of freedom and justice. Read about bell's creation, the crack and its adoption by the abolitionist movement as a symbol in their campaign to end the injustice of slavery

    Tradition tells of a chime that changed the world on July 8, 1776, with the Liberty Bell ringing out from the tower of Independence Hall summoning the citizens of Philadelphia to hear the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence by Colonel John Nixon.

    The Pennsylvania Assembly ordered the Bell in 1751 to commemorate the 50-year anniversary of William Penn's 1701 Charter of Privileges, Pennsylvania's original Constitution. It speaks of the rights and freedoms valued by people the world over. Particularly forward thinking were Penn's ideas on religious freedom, his liberal stance on Native American rights, and his inclusion of citizens in enacting laws.

    The Liberty Bell gained iconic importance when abolitionists in their efforts to put an end to slavery throughout America adopted it as a symbol.

    As the Bell was created to commemorate the golden anniversary of Penn's Charter, the quotation "Proclaim Liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof," from Leviticus 25:10, was particularly apt. For the line in the Bible immediately preceding "proclaim liberty" is, "And ye shall hallow the fiftieth year." What better way to pay homage to Penn and hallow the 50th year than with a bell proclaiming liberty?

    Also inscribed on the Bell is the quotation, "By Order of the Assembly of the Province of Pensylvania for the State House in Philada." Note that the spelling of "Pennsylvania" was not at that time universally adopted. In fact, in the original Constitution, the name of the state is also spelled "Pensylvania." If you get a chance to visit the second floor of Independence Hall in Philadelphia, take a moment to look at the original maps on the wall. They, too, have the state name spelled "Pensylvania" (and the Atlantic Ocean called by the name of that day, "The Western Ocean"). The choice of the quotation was made by Quaker Isaac Norris, speaker of the Assembly.

    Centered on the front of the Bell are the words, "Pass and Stow / Philada / MDCCLIII." We'll get to Pass and Stow in a bit.

    The Crack

    There is widespread disagreement about when the first crack appeared on the Bell. Hair-line cracks on bells were bored out to prevent expansion. However, it is agreed that the final expansion of the crack which rendered the Bell unringable was on Washington's Birthday in 1846.

    The Philadelphia Public Ledger takes up the story in its February 26, 1846 publication:

    "The old Independence Bell rang its last clear note on Monday last in honor of the birthday of Washington and now hangs in the great city steeple irreparably cracked and dumb. It had been cracked before but was set in order of that day by having the edges of the fracture filed so as not to vibrate against each other ... It gave out clear notes and loud, and appeared to be in excellent condition until noon, when it received a sort of compound fracture in a zig-zag direction through one of its sides which put it completely out of tune and left it a mere wreck of what it was."

    The Bell as Icon

    The Liberty Bell. Boston: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1856

    The Bell achieved its iconic status when abolitionists adopted the Bell as a symbol for the movement. It was first used in this association as a frontispiece to an 1837 edition of , published by the New York Anti-Slavery Society.

    It was, in fact, the abolitionists who gave it the name "Liberty Bell," in reference to its inscription. It was previously called simply the "State House bell."

    In retrospect, it is a remarkably apt metaphor for a country literally cracked and freedom fissured for its black inhabitants. The line following "proclaim liberty" is, "It shall be a jubilee unto you; and ye shall return every man unto his possession, and ye shall return every man unto his family." The Abolitionists understood this passage to mean that the Bible demanded all slaves and prisoners be freed every 50 years.

    William Lloyd Garrison's anti-slavery publication reprinted a Boston abolitionist pamphlet containing a poem about the Bell, entitled, which represents the first documented use of the name, "Liberty Bell."

    The Bell and the Declaration of Independence

    In 1847, George Lippard wrote a fictional story for which told of an elderly bellman waiting in the State House steeple for the word that Congress had declared Independence. The story continues that privately he began to doubt Congress's resolve. Suddenly the bellman's grandson, who was eavesdropping on the doors of Congress, yelled to him, "Ring, Grandfather! Ring!"

    This story so captured the imagination of people throughout the land that the Liberty Bell was forever associated with the Declaration of Independence.

    The truth is that the steeple was in bad condition and historians today highly doubt that the Bell actually rang in 1776. However, its association with the Declaration of Independence was fixed in the collective mythology.

    Bell as Symbol

    After the divisive Civil War, Americans sought a symbol of unity. The flag became one such symbol, and the Liberty Bell another. To help heal the wounds of the war, the Liberty Bell would travel across the country.

    Source : www.ushistory.org

    How many times does the Liberty Bell ring on each Independence Day?

    Answer (1 of 2): The Liberty Bell was irreparably damaged in 1854 and had never rung since that time. So the bell has not rung for Independence Day, or any other day, for more than a century and a half. The Liberty Bell never had a close association with independence, other than the fact that it...

    How many times does the Liberty Bell ring on each Independence Day?

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    Former Pastor (ret.) (1974–2005)Author has 9.5K answers and 1.4M answer views11mo

    The Liberty bell's purpose was to mark the 50th anniversary of the 1701 Charter of Privileges by William Penn. The Bell was the last rung on February 26, 1846, to honor the birthday of George Washington. After that event, the bell never rang again due to an irreparable crack.

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    Michael Troy · Follow

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    The Liberty Bell was irreparably damaged in 1854 and had never rung since that time. So the bell has not rung for Independence Day, or any other day, for more than a century and a half.

    The Liberty Bell never had a close association with independence, other than the fact that it once hung in the State House, what we today call Independence Hall.

    The steeple that house the bell was badly rotted, reported as early as 1773. Many historians believe the bell had been removed from the steeple and was not available to ring on the first Independence day. When the British captured the city the following

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    Should African Americans celebrate Independence Day?

    I am an African-American.

    I raised my right hand in service to this nation.

    I've braved the worst the North Atlantic Ocean had to bear.

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    I've eaten pounds of Iraqi dust on patrol.

    And I would do this shit again if this nation needed me to do so.

    And I come from a long line of family members who have done the same.

    This is not a perfect nation; in fact our government is often referred to as an experiment in democracy. This nation has, and probably will continue to, screw up from time to time. But it always (eventually) makes up for i

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    Why doesn't England celebrate its Independence Day?

    Well, there isn’t really anything to celebrate because we have never declared independence.

    Constantine III, the emperor of the Western Roman Empire crossed the channel to invade Gaul, leaving Britain with a lacklustre force with which to defend itself. A year later, the British would then expel any form of Roman authority still present, after having thrown off their allegiance to Constantine III. It was at this point that they turned to the Roman emperor Honorius, as a result of continuing incursions. The letter that told the British that they would have to look for their own defenses which wo

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    Why does the Liberty Bell ring 13 times on Independence Day? What is the importance of it and what is the backstory?

    The Liberty Bell has not rung at all since it was damaged in 1846. Prior to that, it had been rung to commemorate certain events, even though other bells had taken its place for daily use. There was never any particular tradition to ring it 13 times. Of course, 13 is the number of delegations that declared independence.

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    What is the significance of the United States' Independence Day?

    Originally Answered: Why does the USA celebrate Independence Day?

    There was this thing called the Revolutionary War. Also called the War for Independance. Because we once belonged to Great Britain and we decided we didn’t want to belong to them any longer because the British King was abusing his powers and increasingly independant minded colonies didn’t like it. So we rebelled and we fought. And we won our Independance from Britain and became the United States of America. And we celebrate that every year on the fourth day of July.

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    What is Written on American's Liberty Bell?

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    Do you want to see answer or more ?
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