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    When it first entered World War II, why did the United States commit most of its resources to the war in Europe?

    A. Stalin assured Roosevelt that the Soviet Union could deal with Japan.

    B. Roosevelt felt the other thirty percent was needed to defend the US mainland.

    C. Roosevelt did not feel the United States needed to engage Japan.

    D. Roosevelt felt that Germany was more of a threat than Japan.

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    D.

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    Which of the following was an important challenge of fighting a two-front war for the Allies?

    A. preventing the spread of a two-front war to North America

    B. identifying generals to lead in both theaters of the war

    C. supplying the troops across a huge part of the globe

    D. limiting the ability of Germany and Japan to combine forces

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    C.

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    Terms in this set (10)

    When it first entered World War II, why did the United States commit most of its resources to the war in Europe?

    A. Stalin assured Roosevelt that the Soviet Union could deal with Japan.

    B. Roosevelt felt the other thirty percent was needed to defend the US mainland.

    C. Roosevelt did not feel the United States needed to engage Japan.

    D. Roosevelt felt that Germany was more of a threat than Japan.

    D.

    Which of the following was an important challenge of fighting a two-front war for the Allies?

    A. preventing the spread of a two-front war to North America

    B. identifying generals to lead in both theaters of the war

    C. supplying the troops across a huge part of the globe

    D. limiting the ability of Germany and Japan to combine forces

    C.

    Which of the following best describes the 1942 Allied strategy in North Africa?

    A. The Allies advanced on Axis troops in Libya from both east and west, trapping them in the middle.

    B. The Allies pushed Rommel's troops out of Egypt and trapped them against more Allied forces in the west.

    C. The Allies first fought Rommel in Morocco and Algeria, then moved eastward into Egypt.

    D. The Allies landed along the coast and eventually pushed Rommel's troops inland.

    B.

    During World War II, which pair were Allied nations?

    A. France and Morocco

    B. Germany and Italy

    C. Great Britain and the Soviet Union

    D. Great Britain and Morocco

    C.

    At their meeting in January of 1942, what argument persuaded President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill to pursue a "Europe-first" strategy?

    A.It was felt that Germany posed a greater threat than Japan.

    B. The United States was preparing to fight Japan, the strongest Axis nation.

    C. Military leaders felt it was necessary to focus on Europe first.

    D. The Allies had to stop Germany from sending reinforcements to Japan.

    A.

    During World War II, which of the following pairs were Axis nations?

    A. France and Great Britain

    B. Germany and Italy

    C. Germany and the Soviet Union

    D. Italy and the Soviet Union

    B.

    Which Allied nation controlled the Suez Canal in North Africa?

    A. Great Britain B. Egypt C. Japan

    D. the United States

    A.

    Who was the leader of an Allied nation during the war in Europe?

    A. Adolf Hitler B. George Patton C. Benito Mussolini D. Joseph Stalin D.

    In 1941, who commanded US troops in Europe?

    A. Douglas MacArthur

    B. George Patton

    C. Franklin Roosevelt

    D. Dwight D. Eisenhower

    D.

    During World War II, Germany tried to capture the Russian city of Stalingrad because

    A. it was the site of atrocities committed by Stalin.

    B. it had a strategic location along the Volga River.

    C. it had a large and persecuted German population.

    D. it was where aggression against Germany was centered.

    B.

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    Verified questions

    WORLD HISTORY

    Source : quizlet.com

    During World War II, Germany tried to capture the Russian city of Stalingrad because

    During World War II, Germany tried to capture the Russian city of Stalingrad because it had a strategic location along the Volga River

    During World War II, Germany tried to capture the Russian city of Stalingrad because A) it was the site of atrocities committed by Stalin. B) it had a strategic location along the Volga River. C) it had a large and persecuted German population. D) it was where aggression against Germany was centered.

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    During World War II, Germany tried to capture the Russian city of Stalingrad because it had a strategic location along the Volga River (answer B).

    Explanation:

    The Battle of Stalingrad is the most significant and bloody confrontation of World War II, having lasted for five months and ending in a Soviet victory. The tenacity with which both sides tried to achieve their goals contributed heavily to the intensity and length of the conflict.

    A Photograph Taken During the Battle of Stalingrad (Source: https://warontherocks.com)

    The reason why both sides wanted to control Stalingrad was its strategic importance. The city was a large armament producer, and its location along the Volga River would allow the forces that held it to control barge traffic along the stream.

    There was another reason, one related to the name of the city. Taking the location named after Stalin, the leader of the USSR, would afford Germany a significant morale advantage. However, this idea was never central to the offensive.

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    . (2022) 'During World War II, Germany tried to capture the Russian city of Stalingrad because A) it was the site of atrocities committed by Stalin. B) it had a strategic location along the Volga River. C) it had a large and persecuted German population. D) it was where aggression against Germany was centered'. 24 March. (Accessed: 16 June 2022).

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    Which of the following best describes the state of the US economy at the end of World War II? A) It was starting to come out of the Great Depression. B) It was deep into the second Great Depression. C) It was experiencing steady growth from wartime production. D) It was entering yet another recession. 2)Which two groups cooperated with the government to switch from peacetime to wartime production? A) state governments and armed forces B) labor and business C) the Allies and the Axis powers D) the president and Congress

    The period from 1968 to the present seems to reflect an insurgent conservatism in American life. What, if anything changed? Was movement Simply " Old wine in the bottle" or something truly new, perhaps revolutionary? What were the elements that contributed to this conservative movement? What does it mean?

    Source : academic.tips

    Battle of Stalingrad

    The Battle of Stalingrad was a brutal military campaign between Russian forces and those of Nazi Germany and the Axis powers during World War II. Germany's defeat in the battle marked a turning point of the war in favor of the Allies.

    Battle of Stalingrad

    Author: History.com Editors Updated: Jun 6, 2019 Original: Nov 9, 2009

    Contents

    Prelude to the Battle of Stalingrad

    Battle of Stalingrad Begins

    ‘Not a Step Back!’

    Russian Winter Sets In

    Battle of Stalingrad Ends

    Sources

    The Battle of Stalingrad was a brutal military campaign between Russian forces and those of Nazi Germany and the Axis powers during World War II. The battle is infamous as one of the largest, longest and bloodiest engagements in modern warfare: From August 1942 through February 1943, more than two million troops fought in close quarters – and nearly two million people were killed or injured in the fighting, including tens of thousands of Russian civilians. But the Battle of Stalingrad (one of Russia’s important industrial cities) ultimately turned the tide of World War II in favor of the Allied forces.

    Prelude to the Battle of Stalingrad

    In the middle of World War II – having captured territory in much of present-day Ukraine and Belarus in the spring on 1942 – Germany’s Wehrmacht forces decided to mount an offensive on southern Russia in the summer of that year.

    Under the leadership of ruthless head of state Joseph Stalin, Russian forces had already successfully rebuffed a German attack on the western part of the country – one that had the ultimate goal of taking Moscow – during the winter of 1941-42. However, Stalin’s Red Army had suffered significant losses in the fighting, both in terms of manpower and weaponry.

    Stalin and his generals, including future Soviet Union leader Nikita Khrushchev, fully expected another Nazi attack to be aimed at Moscow. However, Hitler and the Wehrmacht had other ideas.

    They set their sights on Stalingrad, because the city served as an industrial center in Russia, producing, among other important goods, artillery for the country’s troops. The Volga River, which runs through the city, was also an important shipping route connecting the western part of the country with its distant eastern regions.

    Ultimately, Adolf Hitler wanted the Wehrmacht to occupy Stalingrad, seeing its value for propaganda purposes, given that it bore Stalin’s name. For similar reasons, the Russians felt a special need to protect it.

    When Hitler proclaimed that upon taking Stalingrad all of the city’s male residents would be killed and its women deported, the stage was set for a bloody, hard-fought battle. Stalin ordered all Russians strong enough to hold a rifle to take up arms in defense of the city.

    The 6th Army of the Wehrmacht began their assault on August 23, 1942.

    Battle of Stalingrad Begins

    Russian forces were initially able to slow the German Wehrmacht’s advances during a series of brutal skirmishes just north of Stalingrad. Stalin’s forces lost more than 200,000 men, but they successfully held off German soldiers.

    With a firm understanding of Hitler’s plans, the Russians had already shipped much of the stores of grain and cattle out of Stalingrad. However, the city’s 400,000-plus residents were not evacuated, as the Russian leadership believed their presence would inspire troops.

    Within a few days of launching its attack, Germany’s Luftwaffe air force had rendered the Volga River impassable to shipping and had sunk several Russian commercial vessels in the process. From late August through the end of the assault, the Luftwaffe conducted dozens of air strikes on the city.

    The number of civilian casualties is unknown. However, it’s believed that tens of thousands were killed, and that tens of thousands more were captured and forced into slave labor in camps in Germany.

    By September, the Luftwaffe essentially had control of the skies over Stalingrad, and the Russians were getting desperate. Workers in the city not involved in war-related weapons production were soon asked to take up fighting, often without firearms of their own. Women were enlisted to dig trenches at the front lines.

    And yet, the Russians continued to suffer heavy losses. By the fall of 1942, Stalingrad was in ruins.

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    Despite heavy casualties and the pounding delivered by the Luftwaffe, Stalin instructed his forces in the city to not retreat, famously decreeing in Order No. 227: “Not a step back!” Those who surrendered would be subject to a trial by military tribunal and face possible execution.

    With fewer than 20,000 troops in the city and less than 100 tanks, Stalin’s generals finally began sending reinforcements into the city and surrounding areas. Fighting raged in the streets of Stalingrad, with both sides using snipers poised on the roofs of the city’s buildings.

    Russian generals Georgy Zhukov and Aleksandr Vasilevsky organized Russian troops in the mountains to the north and west of the city. From there, they launched a counterattack, famously known as Operation Uranus.

    Although they again sustained significant losses, Russian forces were able to form what in essence was a defensive ring around the city by late November 1942, trapping the nearly 300,000 German and Axis troops in the 6th Army. This effort became the subject of a propaganda film produced after the war, The Battle of Stalingrad.

    With the Russian blockade limiting access to supplies, German forces trapped in Stalingrad slowly starved. The Russians would seize upon the resulting weakness during the cold, harsh winter months that followed.

    Source : www.history.com

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