if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    during which stage of the cell cycle does dna replication occur?

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get during which stage of the cell cycle does dna replication occur? from EN Bilgi.

    During what stage of the cell cycle does DNA replication occur?

    During Mitosis, DNA is replicated during the S phase (Synthesis phase) of Interphase. Interphase is basically the daily life cycle of the cell. Cells spend most of their life in Interphase before Mitosis occurs (M phase).

    During what stage of the cell cycle does DNA replication occur?

    Biology DNA Structure and Function DNA Replication

    1 Answer

    Sam S. Oct 28, 2015

    During Mitosis, DNA is replicated during the S phase (Synthesis phase) of Interphase.

    Interphase is basically the daily life cycle of the cell. Cells spend most of their life in Interphase before Mitosis occurs (M phase).

    Answer link

    Related questions

    Why does DNA polymerase proofread the new strand?

    Why are nucleotides added to 3' end?

    How does the base pairing rule affect DNA replication?

    How does dna replication relate to mitosis?

    How does DNA polymerase work?

    How do DNA replication and DNA transcription differ?

    How does dna replication differ between prokaryotes and eukaryotes?

    What are nucleotides?

    What is DNA polymerase?

    What is DNA replication?

    See all questions in DNA Replication

    Impact of this question

    159404 views around the world

    You can reuse this answer

    Creative Commons License

    Source : socratic.org

    During what stage of the cell cycle does DNA replication occur?

    During what stage of the cell cycle does DNA replication occur? - Get the answer to this question and access a vast question bank that is tailored for students.

    Academic QuestionsBiology QuestionsDuring What Stage Of The Cell Cycle Does Dna Replication Occur

    During what stage of the cell cycle does DNA replication occur?

    DNA is replicated during the S phase (Synthesis phase) of Interphase. During S phase, which follows G 1 phase, all the chromosomes are replicated. Following replication, each chromosome now consists of two sister chromatids . Thus, the amount of DNA in the cell has effectively doubled, even though the ploidy , or chromosome count, of the cell remains at 2 n . The number of chromosomes in the nucleus, which determines the ploidy, remains unchanged from the beginning to the end of the S phase.

    Was this answer helpful?

    5 (1)

    Source : byjus.com

    The Eukaryotic Cell Cycle

    The division cycle of most cells consists of four coordinated processes: cell growth, DNA replication, distribution of the duplicated chromosomes to daughter cells, and cell division. In bacteria, cell growth and DNA replication take place throughout most of the cell cycle, and duplicated chromosomes are distributed to daughter cells in association with the plasma membrane. In eukaryotes, however, the cell cycle is more complex and consists of four discrete phases. Although cell growth is usually a continuous process, DNA is synthesized during only one phase of the cell cycle, and the replicated chromosomes are then distributed to daughter nuclei by a complex series of events preceding cell division. Progression between these stages of the cell cycle is controlled by a conserved regulatory apparatus, which not only coordinates the different events of the cell cycle but also links the cell cycle with extracellular signals that control cell proliferation.

    An official website of the United States government

    Log in Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation Bookshelf

    Browse Titles Advanced

    Help

    By agreement with the publisher, this book is accessible by the search feature, but cannot be browsed.

    The Cell: A Molecular Approach. 2nd edition.

    Show details

    The Eukaryotic Cell Cycle

    The division cycle of most cells consists of four coordinated processes: cell growth, DNA replication, distribution of the duplicated chromosomes to daughter cells, and cell division. In bacteria, cell growth and DNA replication take place throughout most of the cell cycle, and duplicated chromosomes are distributed to daughter cells in association with the plasma membrane. In eukaryotes, however, the cell cycle is more complex and consists of four discrete phases. Although cell growth is usually a continuous process, DNA is synthesized during only one phase of the cell cycle, and the replicated chromosomes are then distributed to daughter nuclei by a complex series of events preceding cell division. Progression between these stages of the cell cycle is controlled by a conserved regulatory apparatus, which not only coordinates the different events of the cell cycle but also links the cell cycle with extracellular signals that control cell proliferation.

    Go to:

    Phases of the Cell Cycle

    A typical eukaryotic cell cycle is illustrated by human cells in culture, which divide approximately every 24 hours. As viewed in the microscope, the cell cycle is divided into two basic parts: mitosis and interphase. Mitosis (nuclear division) is the most dramatic stage of the cell cycle, corresponding to the separation of daughter chromosomes and usually ending with cell division (cytokinesis). However, mitosis and cytokinesis last only about an hour, so approximately 95% of the cell cycle is spent in interphase—the period between mitoses. During interphase, the chromosomes are decondensed and distributed throughout the nucleus, so the nucleus appears morphologically uniform. At the molecular level, however, interphase is the time during which both cell growth and DNA replication occur in an orderly manner in preparation for cell division.

    The cell grows at a steady rate throughout interphase, with most dividing cells doubling in size between one mitosis and the next. In contrast, DNA is synthesized during only a portion of interphase. The timing of DNA synthesis thus divides the cycle of eukaryotic cells into four discrete phases (Figure 14.1). The M phase of the cycle corresponds to mitosis, which is usually followed by cytokinesis. This phase is followed by the G1 phase (gap 1), which corresponds to the interval (gap) between mitosis and initiation of DNA replication. During G1, the cell is metabolically active and continuously grows but does not replicate its DNA. G1 is followed by S phase (synthesis), during which DNA replication takes place. The completion of DNA synthesis is followed by the G2 phase (gap 2), during which cell growth continues and proteins are synthesized in preparation for mitosis.

    Figure 14.1

    Phases of the cell cycle. The division cycle of most eukaryotic cells is divided into four discrete phases: M, G1, S, and G2. M phase (mitosis) is usually followed by cytokinesis. S phase is the period during which DNA replication occurs. The cell grows (more...)

    The duration of these cell cycle phases varies considerably in different kinds of cells. For a typical rapidly proliferating human cell with a total cycle time of 24 hours, the G1 phase might last about 11 hours, S phase about 8 hours, G2 about 4 hours, and M about 1 hour. Other types of cells, however, can divide much more rapidly. Budding yeasts, for example, can progress through all four stages of the cell cycle in only about 90 minutes. Even shorter cell cycles (30 minutes or less) occur in early embryo cells shortly after fertilization of the egg (Figure 14.2). In this case, however, cell growth does not take place. Instead, these early embryonic cell cycles rapidly divide the egg cytoplasm into smaller cells. There is no G1 or G2 phase, and DNA replication occurs very rapidly in these early embryonic cell cycles, which therefore consist of very short S phases alternating with M phases.

    Figure 14.2

    Embryonic cell cycles. Early embryonic cell cycles rapidly divide the cytoplasm of the egg into smaller cells. The cells do not grow during these cycles, which lack G1 and G2 and consist simply of short S phases alternating with M phases.

    In contrast to the rapid proliferation of embryonic cells, some cells in adult animals cease division altogether (e.g., nerve cells) and many other cells divide only occasionally, as needed to replace cells that have been lost because of injury or cell death. Cells of the latter type include skin fibroblasts, as well as the cells of many internal organs, such as the liver, kidney, and lung. As discussed further in the next section, these cells exit G1 to enter a quiescent stage of the cycle called G0, where they remain metabolically active but no longer proliferate unless called on to do so by appropriate extracellular signals.

    Source : www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 8 day ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer