if you want to remove an article from website contact us from top.

    drinking alcohol over a long period of time decreases blood pressure

    James

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    get drinking alcohol over a long period of time decreases blood pressure from EN Bilgi.

    Effect of alcohol on blood pressure

    Alcohol is consumed by over 2 billion people worldwide. It is a common substance of abuse and its use can lead to more than 200 disorders including hypertension. Alcohol has both acute and chronic effects on blood pressure. This review aimed to ...

    Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2020 Jul; 2020(7): CD012787.

    Published online 2020 Jul 1. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD012787.pub2

    PMCID: PMC8130994 PMID: 32609894

    Effect of alcohol on blood pressure

    Monitoring Editor: Cochrane Hypertension Group, Sara Tasnim, Chantel Tang, Vijaya M Musini, and James M Wright

    Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer

    This article is an update of "Effect of alcohol on blood pressure" in volume 2017, CD012787.

    This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

    Go to:

    Abstract

    Background

    Alcohol is consumed by over 2 billion people worldwide. It is a common substance of abuse and its use can lead to more than 200 disorders including hypertension. Alcohol has both acute and chronic effects on blood pressure. This review aimed to quantify the acute effects of different doses of alcohol over time on blood pressure and heart rate in an adult population.

    Objectives

    Primary objective

    To determine short‐term dose‐related effects of alcohol versus placebo on systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure in healthy and hypertensive adults over 18 years of age.

    Secondary objective

    To determine short‐term dose‐related effects of alcohol versus placebo on heart rate in healthy and hypertensive adults over 18 years of age.

    Search methods

    The Cochrane Hypertension Information Specialist searched the following databases for randomised controlled trials up to March 2019: the Cochrane Hypertension Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2019, Issue 2), in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (from 1946); Embase (from 1974); the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform; and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also contacted authors of relevant articles regarding further published and unpublished work. These searches had no language restrictions.

    Selection criteria

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing effects of a single dose of alcohol versus placebo on blood pressure (BP) or heart rate (HR) in adults (≥ 18 years of age).

    Data collection and analysis

    Two review authors (ST and CT) independently extracted data and assessed the quality of included studies. We also contacted trial authors for missing or unclear information. Mean difference (MD) from placebo with 95% confidence interval (CI) was the outcome measure, and a fixed‐effect model was used to combine effect sizes across studies.

    Main results

    We included 32 RCTs involving 767 participants. Most of the study participants were male (N = 642) and were healthy. The mean age of participants was 33 years, and mean body weight was 78 kilograms.

    Low‐dose alcohol (< 14 g) within six hours (2 RCTs, N = 28) did not affect BP but did increase HR by 5.1 bpm (95% CI 1.9 to 8.2) (moderate‐certainty evidence).

    Medium‐dose alcohol (14 to 28 g) within six hours (10 RCTs, N = 149) decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) by 5.6 mmHg (95% CI ‐8.3 to ‐3.0) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 4.0 mmHg (95% CI ‐6.0 to ‐2.0) and increased HR by 4.6 bpm (95% CI 3.1 to 6.1) (moderate‐certainty evidence for all).

    Medium‐dose alcohol within 7 to 12 hours (4 RCTs, N = 54) did not affect BP or HR.

    Medium‐dose alcohol > 13 hours after consumption (4 RCTs, N = 66) did not affect BP or HR.

    High‐dose alcohol (> 30 g) within six hours (16 RCTs, N = 418) decreased SBP by 3.5 mmHg (95% CI ‐6.0 to ‐1.0), decreased DBP by 1.9 mmHg (95% CI‐3.9 to 0.04), and increased HR by 5.8 bpm (95% CI 4.0 to 7.5). The certainty of evidence was moderate for SBP and HR, and was low for DBP.

    High‐dose alcohol within 7 to 12 hours of consumption (3 RCTs, N = 54) decreased SBP by 3.7 mmHg (95% CI ‐7.0 to ‐0.5) and DBP by 1.7 mmHg (95% CI –4.6 to 1.8) and increased HR by 6.2 bpm (95% CI 3.0 to 9.3). The certainty of evidence was moderate for SBP and HR, and low for DBP.

    High‐dose alcohol ≥ 13 hours after consumption (4 RCTs, N = 154) increased SBP by 3.7 mmHg (95% CI 2.3 to 5.1), DBP by 2.4 mmHg (95% CI 0.2 to 4.5), and HR by 2.7 bpm (95% CI 0.8 to 4.6) (moderate‐certainty evidence for all).

    Authors' conclusions

    High‐dose alcohol has a biphasic effect on BP; it decreases BP up to 12 hours after consumption and increases BP > 13 hours after consumption. High‐dose alcohol increases HR at all times up to 24 hours. Findings of this review are relevant mainly to healthy males, as only small numbers of women were included in the included trials.

    Go to:

    Plain language summary

    Alcohol has a biphasic effect on blood pressure and increases heart rateReview question

    We reviewed available evidence about the short‐term effects of different doses of alcoholic drinks compared to non‐alcoholic drinks on blood pressure and heart rate in adults (≥ 18 years) with both normal and raised blood pressure.

    Background

    Drinking excessive alcohol is considered one of the most common causes of raised blood pressure. We wanted to quantify the effects of a single dose of alcohol on blood pressure and heart rate within 24 hours of consumption.

    Study characteristics

    We included 32 randomised controlled trials involving 767 participants published up to March 2019. Although these trials included adults from 18 to 96 years of age with various health conditions, most study participants were young healthy males. The source of funding was not reported for a majority of the studies.

    Source : www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

    How alcohol affects blood pressure and the heart

    Drinking too much alcohol can cause high blood pressure and damage your heart. Find out how you can reduce your risk of high blood pressure at HSE.ie.

    Skip to main content

    Get the latest information on COVID-19

    HSE.ie Alcohol

    Alcohol's effect on the body

    Blood pressure and the heart

    The brain The liver The pancreas The stomach Weight gain

    Sex life and fertility

    How alcohol affects your looks

    1. Blood pressure and the heart

    A lot of alcohol over a long time - or too much on a single occasion - can damage the heart or interfere with the way it works.

    This can cause different problems, including:

    high blood pressure (hypertension)

    increased risk of strokes

    cardiomyopathy (stretching and drooping of the heart muscle)

    arrhythmias (irregular heartbeat)

    High blood pressure (hypertension)

    High blood pressure is the most common alcohol-related health problem. Many people don’t realise they have it.

    Drinking a lot of alcohol can affect the muscles in your blood vessels. This can cause them to become narrower.

    The more alcohol you drink the higher the risk of developing hypertension. If you drink regularly you are at risk, especially if you’re over the age of 35. One drink a day can increase the risk.

    When your blood vessels are narrower, the heart has to work harder to push blood around your body. This makes your blood pressure go up.

    High blood pressure can significantly increase your risk of:

    stroke heart disease

    vascular dementia - caused by not enough blood being able to get to the brain

    chronic kidney disease

    Related topics

    Weekly low-risk alcohol guidelines

    Reduce your risk of hypertension

    Hypertension is one of the most preventable alcohol-related problems. Drinking less alcohol lowers your blood pressure.

    Reducing the amount you drink can help you lose weight. This is also good for heart health.

    Hypertension causes most problems when it’s left untreated. Get your blood pressure checked regularly so that you can get treatment if you need it.

    Your GP or pharmacist can check your blood pressure.

    Stroke

    A stroke happens when blood cannot reach the brain.

    Binge drinking and long-term heavy drinking can lead to strokes.

    Alcohol also causes other problems that can lead to strokes, or makes them worse. For example, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, and weakened heart muscle.

    Stretching and drooping of the heart muscle ( cardiomyopathy)

    Long-term heavy drinking can cause the heart muscles to weaken. This is called alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

    If your heart muscle is droopy and stretched it can’t pump blood around your body very well. If the blood flow to other parts of your body is not enough, it can damage organs and tissues.

    It can also cause symptoms like:

    breathing difficulties

    extreme tiredness

    swollen legs and feet

    irregular heartbeat heart failure

    Irregular heart beat (arrhythmias)

    Binge drinking and long-term high-risk drinking can affect how quick your heart beats.

    Alcohol can make the heart beat too quickly, or irregularly. These heart rate abnormalities are called arrhythmias.

    Page Last Reviewed: 08/11/2019

    Next Review Due: 08/11/2022

    Back to top

    Source : www2.hse.ie

    Alcohol and blood pressure

    Alcohol can contribute to high blood pressure, which can lead to serious heart conditions. Get the facts with Drinkaware

    Alcohol and blood pressure

    Alcohol can have a serious long-term effect on blood pressure

    Drinking alcohol increases blood pressure and repeated drinking causes sustained high blood pressure.

    Alcohol consumption is an entirely preventable cause of severe hypertension (the medical name for sustained high blood pressure) in both men and women.1 Untreated high blood pressure greatly increases your risk of stroke and heart attack.2

    What is high blood pressure?

    A normal heart pumps blood around the body easily, at a low pressure. Having high blood pressure means that your heart must pump harder, and the arteries have to carry blood that’s flowing under greater pressure. This puts a strain on your arteries and your heart, which in turn increases your risk of a heart attack, a stroke or of suffering from kidney disease.

    What are the symptoms of high blood pressure?

    You can't usually feel or notice high blood pressure. In fact, many people may not know they have it. This is because high blood pressure very rarely causes any obvious symptoms until a serious acute event such as a heart attack or stroke.

    The best way of knowing if there’s a problem is to have your blood pressure measured. You can have this done at your GP surgery, some local pharmacies, at your NHS Health Check or you can buy a reliable blood pressure monitor from the pharmacist.

    Are you drinking too much? Take our self-assessment

    What causes high blood pressure?

    There isn’t always a clear explanation as to why someone’s blood pressure is high. However, there are several factors that can play a part in increasing the risks of developing hypertension, including:

    Regularly drinking alcohol above the low-risk guidelines

    Not doing enough exercise

    Being overweight

    A family history of high blood pressure

    Consuming too much salt

    How to reduce high blood pressure

    To lower your blood pressure, you should:

    Cut down on alcohol Exercise regularly

    Lose weight, if you are overweight

    Eat a healthy diet, including reducing your salt intake

    How to reduce your drinking

    The UK Chief Medical Officers' (CMO) low risk drinking guidelines advise that people should not regularly drink more than more than 14 units a week to keep health risks from alcohol low. If you do choose to drink, it is best to spread your drinks throughout the week.

    Keep track of what you’re drinking

    Our free MyDrinkaware app can tell you if you're drinking too much. It can even help you cut down.

    Download the app

    Switch to non-alcoholic or low alcohol options

    Have several drink-free days a week

    Further information

    If you’re worried about your blood pressure, talk to a health professional at your GP surgery. Or if you’re looking for more information, Blood Pressure UK offers a range of advice on how to take control of, or prevent, high blood pressure. Call their information line on 020 7882 6218 or visit www.bloodpressureuk.org

    High blood pressure increases the risk of heart problems,  stroke, and kidney disease. More information on these issues is available  from the following organisations:

    British Heart Foundation

    The Stroke Association

    Kidney Research UK

    Further advice and information

    Arming yourself with strategies and tips can help you or a loved one take small steps towards big results.

    How to stay motivated while cutting down on alcohol

    How to cut down on alcohol at home

    What to expect when you stop drinking

    Alcohol and heart disease

    References

    Was this information helpful?

    Last Reviewed: 27th October 2021Next Review due: 27th October 2024

    Newsletter

    Tips to change your relationship with alcohol

    Source : www.drinkaware.co.uk

    Do you want to see answer or more ?
    James 5 month ago
    4

    Guys, does anyone know the answer?

    Click For Answer