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    craving alcohol and an inability to limit the amount of alcohol one consumes are symptoms of fetal alcohol syndrome.

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    Addictionary®

    If we want addiction destigmatized,

    we need a language that's unified.

    The words we use matter. Caution needs to be taken, especially when the disorders concerned are heavily stigmatized as substance use disorders are.

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    A

    ABSTINENCE

    The absence of substance use. However, there are many different types of abstinence. Abstinence is typically interpreted as complete abstinence, defined below:

    Continuous abstinence: not consuming the drug of choice during a specified period of timeEssentially abstinent: not consuming more than a specified amount of the drug over a period of timeMinimal abstinence: achieving a minimal period of recovery during a period of timePoint-in-time abstinence: not consuming the drug of choice at a single point in time (e.g., the past 30 days)Complete abstinence: continuous abstinence from all alcohol and other drugsInvoluntary abstinence: enforced abstinence due to hospitalization or incarceration

    (White, 2012)

    ABUSER

    (Stigma Alert) A person who exhibits impaired control over engaging in substance use (or other reward-seeking behavior, such as gambling) despite suffering severe harms caused by such activity.

    In experimental research, the word “abuser” was found to increase stigma, which can affect quality of care and act as a barrier to treatment-seeking in individuals suffering from addiction. Instead, many have recommended the use of terms that reflect a disorder (e.g., “substance use disorder”) and the use of “person first” language. Consequently, instead of describing someone as a “drug abuser,” it may be less stigmatizing and more medically accurate to describe them as “a person with, or suffering from, addiction or substance use disorder.”

    Learn more about: The Real Stigma of Substance Use Disorders

    (Kelly, Saitz, & Wakeman, 2016; Kelly & Westerhoff, 2010; Kelly et al., 2010)

    ACCEPTANCE AND COMMITMENT THERAPY (ACT)

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT; pronounced like the word “act”) is a cognitive-behavioral approach used in the treatment of substance use disorders that is based on the concepts of acceptance, mindfulness, and personal values.

    Learn more about: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

    ACUTE CARE

    Immediate, short-term medically managed or monitored care, lasting up to 31 days in length. Most addiction treatment programs (e.g., “rehab”) follow an acute care model. Understanding substance use disorder to be a chronic illness, recovery may require ongoing continuing care beyond acute treatment episodes.

    ADDICT

    (Stigma Alert) A person who exhibits impaired control over engaging in substance use (or other reward-seeking behavior, such as gambling) despite suffering severe harms caused by such activity. While this language is commonly used, in order to help decrease stigma associated with these conditions, it has been recommended to use “person first” language; instead of describing someone as an “addict,” describe them as “a person with, or suffering from, addiction or substance use disorder.”

    (Kelly, Saitz, & Wakeman, 2016; Kelly & Westerhoff, 2010; Kelly et al., 2010; Sholten et al., 2017)

    ADDICTION

    According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), addiction is a primary, chronic, neurobiologic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestation. Addiction is characterized by behaviors that include:

    Impaired control over drug use

    Compulsive use

    Continued use despite harm

    Cravings (Ries, 2009)

    Learn more about: Addiction

    ADDICTION COUNSELOR

    Type of non-medically credentialed addiction treatment provider. Counselors vary across jurisdictions in their titles, their required level of education, and required level of training. Addiction counselors encompass “substance abuse counselors” (SACs), “certified alcohol and substance abuse counselors” (CASACs), and “certified alcohol and drug counselors” (CADCs).

    View infographic: Meet Your Recovery Team

    ADDICTION MEDICINE PHYSICIAN

    A board-certified physician in some specialty (e.g., family medicine, pediatrics, neurology) who has undergone specialized training in addiction diagnosis, treatment, and management, but who does not typically provide addiction-specific psychotherapy, although often provides brief counseling.

    View infographic: Meet Your Recovery Team

    ADDICTION PSYCHIATRIST

    A physician who is board-certified as a psychiatrist with specialized training in addiction diagnosis, treatment, and management. Addiction psychiatrists can provide therapy, although most emphasize and prescribe medications and work in collaboration with social workers, psychologists, or counselors who provide psychotherapy.

    View infographic: Meet Your Recovery Team

    ADDICTION TOURISM

    The practice of sending individuals with substance use disorder to treatment centers or rehabilitation facilities outside of their states of permanent residence.

    ADVERSE DETERMINATION

    Any action by a health plan that denies or limits payment for the requested behavioral or medical treatment and services.

    Source : www.recoveryanswers.org

    Health Test

    Start studying Health Test- True and False. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Health Test- True and False

    4.8 12 Reviews

    13 studiers in the last hour

    T/F- Ethanol is not addictive

    Click card to see definition 👆

    F- Ethanol is addictive

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    T/F- The amount of ethanol that leads to intoxication is different from person to person

    Click card to see definition 👆

    T

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    1/26 Created by Charlotte_Coons

    Terms in this set (26)

    T/F- Ethanol is not addictive

    F- Ethanol is addictive

    T/F- The amount of ethanol that leads to intoxication is different from person to person

    T

    T/F- In young people, alcohol use increases the risk of stroke

    T

    T/F- Alcohol consumption causes the kidneys to decrease urine output

    F- Alcohol consumption causes the kidneys to increase urine output

    T/F- Staying alcohol free enhances physical and mental health

    T

    T/F- Fights are more likely to occur at parties where alcohol is used

    T

    T/F- It is estimated that 25 percent of all youth are exposed to family alcohol abuse

    T

    T/F- Teens who drink alcohol are less likely to develop alcohol dependence than individuals who wait until adulthood to begin drinking

    F- Teens who drink alcohol are more likely to develop alcohol dependence than individuals who wait until adulthood to begin drinking

    T/F- Craving alcohol and an inability to limit the amount of alcohol one consumes are symptoms of fetal alcohol syndrome

    F- Craving alcohol and an inability to limit the amount of alcohol one consumes are symptoms of alcoholism

    T/F- The first stage in the development of alcoholism is dependence

    F- The first stage in the development of alcoholism is abuse

    T/F- Individuals who ignore their own needs in order to focus on an alcoholic friend or family member are codependent

    T

    T/F- Sobriety us a term used to describe living without alcohol.

    T

    T/F- Peer pressure plays a role in the choices a teen makes about drug use

    T

    T/F- A person who has developed tolerance needs more of a drug to achieve the same effect

    T

    T/F- Physiological dependence is a leading cause of crime, suicide, and unintentional injuries

    F- Substance abuse is a leading cause of crime, suicide, and unintentional injuries

    T/F- Drug abuse affects the individual by contributing to a rise in health care costs

    F- Drug abuse affects the society by contributing to a rise in health care costs

    T/F- Marijuana smoke contains less cancer-causing chemicals than tobacco smoke

    F- Marijuana smoke contains more cancer-causing chemicals than tobacco smoke

    T/F- Smoking marijuana may damage the immune system

    T

    T/F- Marijuana raises the level of a brain chemical called testosterone

    F- Marijuana raises the level of a brain chemical called dopamine

    T/F- Substances whose fumes are sniffed to give an effect are called steroids

    F- Substances whose fumes are sniffed to give an effect are called inhalants

    T/F- Steroid use often results in depression, paranoia, and violent behavior

    T

    T/F- Any drug that alters brain activity is a stimulant drug

    F- Any drug that alters brain activity is a psychoactive drug

    T/F- Rohypnol and GHB are both known as date-rape drugs

    T

    T/F- Cocaine and crack are both addictive hallucinogenic drugs

    F- Cocaine and crack are both addictive stimulant drugs

    T/F- Ecstasy, LSD, and PCP are all examples of opiate drugs

    F- Ecstasy, LSD, and PCP are all examples of hallucinogenic drugs

    T/F- Psychoactive drug use by teens can lead to addiction

    T

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    What is an alcoholic? How to treat alcoholism

    Alcoholism, now called alcohol use disorder (AUD), refers to an addiction to alcohol. A person with this condition can no longer control their consumption of alcohol and they will become ill if they try to stop suddenly. AUD is a serious and life-threatening condition, but treatment and support are available.

    What is alcohol use disorder, and what is the treatment?

    Medically reviewed by Timothy J. Legg, PhD, PsyD — Written by Tim Newman — Updated on March 9, 2022

    We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process.

    Alcoholism, now known as alcohol use disorder, is a condition in which a person has a desire or physical need to consume alcohol, even though it has a negative impact on their life.

    In the past, a person with this condition was referred to as an “alcoholic.” However, this is increasingly seen as an unhelpful and negative label. Health professionals now say that a person has

    Trusted Source Trusted Source

    an alcohol use disorder (AUD).

    According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), in 2015, 15.1 million

    Trusted Source Trusted Source

    American adults (6.2 percent of the population) had an alcohol use problem.

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), globally, 3.3 million

    Trusted Source Trusted Source

    deaths every year result from the harmful use of alcohol.

    Definition

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    Alcohol abuse disorder refers to a long-term addiction to alcohol.

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) describes alcohol use disorder as “an impaired ability to stop or control alcohol use despite adverse social, occupational, or health consequences.”

    A person with this condition does not know when or how to stop drinking. They spend a lot of time thinking about alcohol, and they cannot control how much they consume, even if it is causing serious problems at home, work, and financially.

    Excessive or inappropriate consumption of alcohol is not necessarily the same as alcohol dependence.

    Moderate alcohol consumption does not generally cause any psychological or physical harm. However, if someone who enjoys social drinking significantly increases their consumption or regularly consumes more than the recommended quantity, AUD may eventually develop.

    Symptoms

    A person who drinks excessive amounts of alcohol will often not be the first person to realize that this is so.

    Some signs and symptoms of AUD include:

    drinking alone or in secret

    not being able to limit how much alcohol is consumed

    blacking out and not being able to remember chunks of time

    having rituals and being irritated if someone else comments on these rituals, for example, drinks before, during, or after meals, or after work

    losing interest in hobbies that were previously enjoyed

    feeling an urge to drink

    feeling irritable when drinking times approach, especially if alcohol is not, or may not be, available

    storing alcohol in unlikely places

    gulping drinks down in order to feel good

    having problems with relationships, the law, finances, or work that stem from drinking

    needing more alcohol to feel its effect

    experiencing nausea, sweating, or shaking when not drinking

    Some people experience some of these signs and symptoms but are not dependent on alcohol.

    Alcohol consumption becomes a problem when it takes precedence over all other activities. Dependence can take several years to develop.

    The problems linked to alcohol dependence are extensive. The effects can be physical, psychological, and social.

    Causes

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    Causes and risk factors include peer pressure, drinking from a young age, and depression.

    Alcohol dependence can take from a few years to several decades to develop. For some people who are particularly vulnerable, it can happen within months.

    Over time, regular alcohol consumption can disrupt the balance of:

    gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain

    glutamate

    GABA controls impulsiveness and glutamate stimulates the nervous system.

    Dopamine levels in the brain rise after consuming alcohol. Dopamine levels may make the drinking experience more gratifying.

    Over the long- or medium-term, excessive drinking can significantly alter the levels of these brain chemicals. This causes the body to crave alcohol in order to feel good and avoid feeling bad.

    Possible risk factors

    Some risk factors may also be linked to excessive drinking.

    Genes: Some specific genetic factors may make some people more likely to develop an addiction to alcohol and other substances. There may be a family history.The age of the first alcoholic drink: A study has suggested that people who start drinking alcohol before the age of 15 years may be more likely

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    to have problems with alcohol later in life.

    Easy access: There appears to be a correlation between easy access to alcohol — such as cheap prices — and alcohol misuse and alcohol-related deaths. One study registered a significant drop in alcohol-related deaths after one state raised alcohol taxes. The effect was found to be nearly two to four times that of other prevention strategies, such as school programs or media campaigns.

    Source : www.medicalnewstoday.com

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