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    The Benefits of Running vs. Walking

    What are the benefits of running vs. walking? Consumer Reports explains which workout might be best for you.

    The Benefits of Running vs. Walking

    Which is better: It all depends on your goals. Here's how to do either one well, even in winter.

    By Sally Wadyka

    Updated January 25, 2020

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    GettyImages-681901931

    Running and walking are both excellent forms of exercise. Those who regularly do either typically have healthier hearts, stronger bones, and lower body weights than their sedentary counterparts.

    The current Physical Activity Guidelines, issued by the Department of Health and Human Services, call for a minimum of 150 to 300 minutes per week of moderate activity or 75 to 150 minutes of vigorous activity.

    So does it matter whether you get those minutes walking or running? Arguments can made for both—and which is right for you depends on your goals and your current fitness level.

    If You Want to Maximize Calorie Burning

    “The key difference between running and walking is how many calories you are burning—not per mile, but per minute of exercise,” says Paul D. Thompson, M.D., chief of cardiology at Hartford Hospital and a professor of medicine and preventive cardiology at the University of Connecticut.

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    How to Get the Biggest Benefits of Walking

    For a 160-pound person, walking at a brisk, 3.5-mph pace for 30 minutes will burn about 156 calories. But running at a 6-mph pace for that same 30 minutes will burn more than double the calories (about 356).

    “Running is a less efficient movement, and it’s more demanding on the body, so it burns more calories per minute,” Thompson says. “But if you’ve got the time to walk long enough to burn the equivalent calories, then walking is fine.”

    That said, if your ultimate goal is to lose weight, chances are neither running nor walking alone is going to do the trick. “Exercise on its own is not the best way to lose weight,” Thompson says. “Research has shown that it needs to be done along with calorie restriction.”

    If You Want to Improve Heart Health

    Running makes the heart work harder than walking, so it stands to reason that it would also make it healthier. But the answer again may come down to how much time you have.

    In a 2013 study that analyzed data from the nearly 50,000 people involved in the National Runners’ Health Study II and National Walkers’ Health Study, researchers found that runners’ risk of cardiovascular disease was 4.5 percent lower than that of those who were inactive.

    But walkers who expended the same amount of energy as runners daily—burned the same amount of calories—had a risk level that was 9 percent lower than those who were inactive.

    If You Want to Reduce Belly Fat

    You can help decrease how much fat you store in your middle if you pick up the pace by interspersing some stretches of all-out sprinting with your jog or walk.

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT)—a workout in which you alternate short bursts of activity at close to your peak heart rate with easier bouts—can help eat away at belly fat. A 2018 analysis of 39 studies, published in the journal Sports Medicine, concluded that HIIT reduced what’s called visceral fat by 1.8 percent.

    This is important because visceral fat is located deep in the abdominal cavity, surrounding organs such as the liver and pancreas. That means the fat can trigger a variety of metabolic changes, including increased insulin resistance and higher triglyceride levels.

    “Reducing visceral fat, even without losing weight, can improve overall health,” says Carol Ewing Garber, Ph.D., a professor of biobehavioral studies at Columbia University Teachers College. (Garber was not involved in the 2018 study.)

    HIIT is also a great way to ease yourself into a running regimen, Garber says.

    “Running is often a big step up in intensity from walking, so it’s best to add it into your routine gradually,” she says. “By alternating higher-intensity intervals of running with lower-intensity walking intervals, you’ll reap the benefits without putting excessive stress on your body.”

    If You're Worried About Your Joints

    Runners pound the pavement, but running doesn’t necessarily lead to more arthritis than walking, according to recent research.

    In a study published in 2017 in the journal Arthritis Care & Research, almost 59 percent of nonrunners had osteoarthritis in their knees compared with 53 percent of the runners; for the group that reported running the most, the prevalence dropped to about 51 percent.

    Another study, published in 2013, that analyzed data from the National Runners’ Health Study found that those who ran more than 1.2 miles per day had a 15 percent lower risk of osteoarthritis and a 35 percent lower risk of hip replacement than those who were less active.

    The researchers theorize that one of the reasons for fewer joint issues among the runners is that, as a whole, the runners had lower body mass indexes (BMI) than the walkers. Lower weight means less stress on the joints—even during a high-impact activity like running.

    Source : www.consumerreports.org

    Walking vs. Running: Which is Better for Your Health?

    While running and walking are both good for your health, each has a few benefits over the other, depending on your personal goals. We explain the mechanics of both so you can make educated and helpful choices for your personal workouts.

    Which Is Better for Your Health: Walking or Running?

    Medically reviewed by Daniel Bubnis, M.S., NASM-CPT, NASE Level II-CSS, Fitness — Written by Jane Chertoff — Updated on March 30, 2020

    Overview

    Walking and running are both excellent forms of cardiovascular exercise. Neither is necessarily “better” than the other. The choice that’s best for you depends entirely on your fitness and health goals.

    If you’re looking to burn more calories or lose weight fast, running is a better choice. But walking can also offer numerous benefits for your health, including helping you maintain a healthy weight.

    Benefits of cardio

    Walking and running are both aerobic cardiovascular, or “cardio” exercise. Some of the health benefits of cardio include:

    helps you lose weight or maintain a healthy weight

    increases stamina

    boosts immune system

    helps prevent or manage chronic conditions

    strengthens your heart

    can extend your life

    Cardiovascular exercise is also good for your mental health. One study

    Trusted Source Trusted Source

    found that just 30 minutes of moderate intensity exercise three times a week reduces anxiety and depression. It can also improve your mood and self-esteem.

    Researchers from the study also say that it’s not necessary to exercise for 30 straight minutes to experience these benefits. Walking for 10 minutes at a time three times a day resulted in the same mental health boost.

    Is walking better than running?

    Walking can provide a lot of the same benefits of running. But running burns nearly double the number of calories as walking.

    For example, for someone who’s 160 pounds, running at 5 miles per hour (mph) burns 606 calories. Walking briskly for the same amount of time at 3.5 mph burns just 314 calories.

    You need to burn approximately 3,500 calories to lose one pound. If your goal is to lose weight, running is a better choice than walking.

    If you’re new to exercise or aren’t able to run, walking can still help you get in shape. Walking is accessible for nearly all fitness levels. It can boost your heart and give you more energy overall.

    Walking vs. running for weight loss

    Speed and power walking vs. running

    Speed walking is walking at a brisk pace, usually 3 mph or greater. Your heart rate is elevated during speed walking. You can burn more calories this way than walking at your usual pace.

    Power walking is usually considered from 3 mph to 5 mph, but some power walkers reach speeds of 7 to 10 mph. Power walking burns a similar number of calories as running. For example, power walking at 4.5 mph for one hour would burn the same as jogging at 4.5 mph for one hour.

    For an effective workout, try pace training. Increase your speed for two minutes at a time, then slow back down. Speed walking doesn’t burn as many calories as running, but it can be an effective workout to elevate your heart rate, boost your mood, and improve your aerobic fitness level.

    Walking with a weighted vest

    Walking with a weighted vest may increase the number of calories you burn. To stay safe, wear a vest that’s no more than 5 to 10 percent of your body weight.

    If you’re looking for an alternative way to lose weight or tone your muscles, try interval walking instead. Pick up the speed for a certain amount of time before slowing down. Or alternatively, try walking with light dumbbells in each hand.

    Incline walking vs. running

    Incline walking involves walking uphill. It can burn a similar number of calories as running. You burn more calories at an incline than just walking on a flat surface.

    Look for a hilly area or walk on an incline on the treadmill. Increase the incline by 5, 10, or 15 percent at a time to practice incline walking. If you’re new to incline walking, you can start gradually and work up to a 15 percent incline.

    Benefits vs. risks

    Running is a great way to get in shape and lose weight. But it’s a high-impact exercise. High-impact workouts can be harder on your body than low-impact exercises like walking.

    Over time, running may lead to common overuse injuries such as:

    stress fractures shin splints

    ITB friction syndrome

    In fact, runners have a much higher risk for exercise-related injury than walkers. Walkers have an approximate 1 to 5 percent injury risk, while runners have a 20 to 70 percent chance.

    If you’re a runner, you can take steps to stay injury-free. Don’t increase your mileage too quickly and try to cross-train several times a week. Or, try walking instead. Walking offers many of the health benefits of running without the same risks for injury.

    Takeaway

    Both walking and running are excellent forms of cardiovascular exercise. Aim to get at least 150 minutes of moderate cardio exercise each week for your health.

    Walking is a smart choice if you’re new to exercise and hoping to get in shape. If you’re looking to lose weight or burn more calories, try running.

    If you’re new to running, start with a program where you alternate between walking and running, such as Couch to 5K. Always check with your doctor before beginning a new exercise routine.

    Last medically reviewed on September 24, 2018

    9 sources collapsed

    Healthline has strict sourcing guidelines and relies on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We avoid using tertiary references. You can learn more about how we ensure our content is accurate and current by reading our editorial policy.

    Source : www.healthline.com

    Difference Between Walking & Running

    Difference Between Walking & Running. Whether you are trying to get in shape or just stay active, both walking and running can help improve your health. Each aerobic activity can be done at the gym or without any exercise equipment, but the advantages of each differ based on your personal health and fitness. ...

    Difference Between Walking & Running

    Live Healthy | Fitness By Brandi Junious

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    Advantages & Disadvantages of Walking

    Whether you are trying to get in shape or just stay active, both walking and running can help improve your health. Each aerobic activity can be done at the gym or without any exercise equipment, but the advantages of each differ based on your personal health and fitness. Therefore, it's important to consider your goals and limitations when deciding which form of exercise is best for you.

    Intensity

    Running is a more intense exercise than walking, and there are many advantages to exercising at a higher intensity. Not only do you use over two times more energy while running compared to walking, you also burn more calories when exercising for the same amount of time. In fact, a 160-pound person can burn 800 calories in one hour by running compared to only 300 calories in that time walking. So running gives you more fat-burning benefits in less time.

    Impact

    Walking is a low-impact exercise, which makes it safer than running. When done using the proper form, walking can provide similar health benefits to running with less chance of injury. Running, on the other hand, is high impact due to the vigorous pounding of your feet on your running surface. This can be hard on your feet and joints and lead to sprains, strains, shin splints and blisters. The surface you run on can increase chances of incurring these injuries, so it's important to pick your running surface, and shoes, accordingly.

    Cardio and Endurance

    Although it takes more time to burn the same number of calories when walking compared to running, those who expend the same number of calories whether walking or running can gain the same cardiovascular benefits of lower blood pressure, improved cholesterol and better heart health. However, running improves your conditioning and endurance better than walking. Those who engage in running regularly will be able to do physical work for longer periods of time and have greater stamina than those who only walk.

    Considerations

    Deciding which form of exercise is best for you ultimately depends on your body type, health and overall goals. Those who are heavier or beginning to exercise may find walking to be an easier way to start working out while building up to more intense exercise. Those with certain injuries or health conditions may also find the low-impact nature of walking more suited to their exercise needs. However, those who wish to lose weight more quickly, want a more efficient workout or want to improve their endurance may find running to be the most beneficial. Either way, always consult your doctor before starting any new exercise routine.

    References

    CNN Health: Which Burns More Calories, Walking or Running?

    Alive: Running the Risks: Running vs Walking

    Strength Running: How to Improve Running Endurance (By Not Running) – For Beginner Runners

    Writer Bio

    Based in the Los Angeles area, Brandi Junious specializes in health-related articles. Her writing reflects her expertise in fitness and education. Junious is the author of children's book "A World Without Trees" and her work has appeared on Modern Mom, The Nest Woman, Chron Healthy Living and at Loseweightandlivehealthy.blogspot.com. Junious holds a bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Southern California and a master's degree in Education.

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