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    Probiotics Help While Taking Antibiotics / Marque Urgent Care

    Tis the season…. of the FLU! If a doctor diagnoses you with the flu this season, chances are you’ll be prescribed an antibiotic. An antibiotic, also called anti-bacterials, are a type of drug used to treat and prevent bacterial infections. They are powerful medicines that either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. They can have some side effects such as diarrhea, cramps, rash and vomiting. Taking a probiotic supplement during your antibiotic treatment can help keep the beneficial bacteria in your gut while reducing the side effects associated with antibiotics.

    How Probiotics Help While Taking Antibiotics by Alyssa Sota

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    What are Antibiotics?

    Tis the season…. of the FLU! If a doctor diagnoses you with the flu this season, chances are you’ll be prescribed an antibiotic. An antibiotic, also called anti-bacterials, are a type of drug used to treat and prevent bacterial infections. They are powerful medicines that either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. They can have some side effects such as diarrhea, cramps, rash and vomiting. Taking a probiotic supplement during your antibiotic treatment can help keep the beneficial bacteria in your gut while reducing the side effects associated with antibiotics.

    What are Probiotics?

    Probiotics are the ‘friendly’ bacteria that normally live in the human digestive tract. These beneficial microbes help complete the digestive process

    and can assist in the production of certain vitamins. When you’re diagnosed with a bacterial infection, a doctor will most likely prescribe an antibiotic to help kill the bacteria that’s making you sick. The truth about antibiotics is that it not only kills the bad bacteria, it also kills your good bacteria. I know, right? Rebuilding your good bacteria is vital to your health and should be taken into consideration when you’re taking an antibiotic. You come to ask yourself though, “Should I even take probiotics while I’m on an antibiotic, since the antibiotic is just going to kill the good bacteria anyway?” Good question…

    Taking Antibiotics & Probiotics at the Same Time

    I’ve spoken to several doctors and experts regarding this subject. You want to start taking a probiotic the same day you start taking an antibiotic, but not at the same time. A quick rule of thumb is to take your probiotic two hours before or two hours after taking your antibiotic. This will give sufficient time for the antibiotic to work while not killing off the beneficial bacteria. You should take probiotics twice a day and on an empty stomach. Experts recommend that you continue to take probiotics even several weeks after an antibiotic treatment to ensure your digestive track is back to normal. However, I recommend taking probiotics daily because it not only keeps your digestive system regular, but also boosts your immune system and enhances the absorption of certain nutrients.  It’s also been shown that a probiotic-rich diet during an antibiotic treatment can reduce the severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and overproduction of yeast.

    Some Probiotic-rich Foods include:

    Yogurt – Specifically goat’s milk. Just make sure to read the labels because not all yogurt is made equally. A lot of popular brand yogurt is filled with artificial sweetener and syrups.

    Miso Soup

    Dark Chocolate – YES!

    Pickles

    Tempeh – Also is a good source of vitamin B12

    Finding the Right Probiotics

    The biggest problem is finding the right probiotic to take because not all are created equal. Many companies produce probiotics with fillers, starches and sweeteners which all feed pathogens in the gut. I would suggest finding a high-grade probiotic that a doctor or medical clinic recommends. Two key probiotic families are Lactobacillus and Bififobacterium. Find a probiotic that contains species from both of these families such as L.acidophilus and B.vifidum. Do your gut a favor and keep it healthy and regular this season!

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    The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

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    Source : www.marquemedical.com

    Should you take probiotics with antibiotics?

    Official answer: There is controversy about whether you should routinely take probiotics with antibiotics and the question cannot be...

    Should you take probiotics with antibiotics?

    Medically reviewed by Carmen Fookes, BPharm. Last updated on Nov 16, 2020.

    Official answer

    by Drugs.com

    There is controversy about whether you should routinely take probiotics with antibiotics and the question cannot be answered with a straight yes or no.

    Evidence for taking probiotics with antibiotics includes a Cochrane review which reported that children who were given a course of probiotics after antibiotics had less diarrhea. Evidence against taking probiotics with antibiotics includes a 2019 Italian study that reported that the gut microbiome of people given probiotics after antibiotics took six months to return to its normal state compared to only three weeks for those not given any probiotics.

    More studies are needed before a definite statement can be made.

    What studies support giving probiotics with antibiotics?

    A Cochrane review of 23 studies (3938 participants) investigated giving probiotics containing either one or a combination of the following: Bacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Clostridium butyricum, Lactobacilli spp., Lactococcus spp., Leuconostoc cremoris, Saccharomyces spp., or Streptococcus sp.

    Results from 22/23 trials that reported on the incidence of antibiotic-associated diarrhea show a significant benefit from probiotics compared to active, placebo, or no treatment control (8% in the probiotic group compared to 19% in the control group). None of the 16 trials (n = 2455) that reported on side events documented any serious side events attributable to probiotics with the most common ones being rash, nausea, gas, flatulence, abdominal bloating, abdominal pain, vomiting, increased phlegm, chest pain, constipation, taste disturbance, and low appetite. The author’s concluded that there was a protective effect of probiotics for preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea. The relative risk was 0.46 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.61) and the NNT was 10.

    The authors considered Lactobacillus rhamnosus or Saccharomyces boulardii at 5 to 40 billion colony forming units/day to be the most appropriate choice. They also commented that although no serious adverse events were observed among the otherwise healthy children in these trials, serious adverse events have been observed in severely debilitated or immuno-compromised children with underlying risk factors (eg, central venous catheter use), and advised that probiotics should be avoided in pediatric populations at risk for adverse events until further research has been conducted.

    What studies do not recommend giving probiotics with antibiotics?

    Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel and other institutions reported that the gut microbiome took longer to return to normal in those people given an 11-strain probiotic treatment for four weeks following a course of antibiotics. This was despite the probiotics effectively colonizing the gut with healthy bacteria. The trouble was the presence of the new bacteria and yeasts strains prevented the gut microbiome from returning to normal for the full six month study period.

    Conversely, the gut microbiome in those given no probiotics returned to normal within three weeks of going off the antibiotics. “ The authors did conclude that this study just examined one type of probiotic, and a different probiotic may be helpful in patients taking different antibiotics. However, they did point out the findings of the study imply that the traditional practice of taking a probiotic after antibiotic may not be beneficial.

    More research is needed to determine if other options to strengthen the gut microbiome, such as fermented food products (eg, sauerkraut and kimchi) or fecal transplantation, is beneficial. Studies have shown that autologous fecal transplantation, which involves collecting stool samples before going on antibiotics and freezing them, brought the gut microbiome back to normal within eight days once the stool was returned to the gut following antibiotic treatment. It took 21 days for the gut microbiota in the group that didn’t undergo fecal transplantation to return to perfect health. Currently, however, the only approved indication for autologous fecal transplantation is for people with C. difficile colitis, which is an inflammation of the colon caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile.

    What are the most common side effects of probiotics?

    The most common side effects reported with probiotics in clinical trials included:

    abdominal bloating abdominal pain chest pain constipation flatulence gas increased phlegm low appetite nausea rash taste disturbance vomiting.

    What is the gut microbiome?

    Our digestive tract is home to trillions of bacteria as well as fungi and viruses – these are known as the gut microbiome.

    The makeup of this biome is largely genetically determined; however, it is heavily influenced by several factors such as whether we are born naturally (vaginally) or by cesarean section, if we were breastfed, our use of antibiotics, and our exposure to chemicals, pesticides, and other toxins.

    Scientists now know that this microbiome is critical to our overall well-being. Some call it our second brain. Small imbalances can cause significant changes to our mental health and in the appearance of our skin and has been linked to almost every known condition such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Type 2 diabetes.

    Source : www.drugs.com

    Probiotics With Antibiotics: How They Help and When to Take Them

    Some doctors recommend taking probiotics during and after you complete a course of antibiotics — here's why.

    HOME HEALTH

    How probiotics may help you deal with the uncomfortable side effects of antibiotics

    By Ashley Laderer Nov 19, 2021

    This article has been medically reviewed by David Seres, MD, a professor of internal medicine at Columbia University's Irving Medical Center.

    Medically Reviewed

    Don't take probiotics and antibiotics at the exact same time. shironosov/Getty Images

    Taking probiotics with antibiotics is safe and may help you cope with side effects of antibiotics.

    Probiotics may be most helpful when taken after a course of antibiotics is finished.

    Research shows that probiotics may help relieve or prevent diarrhea associated with antibiotics.

    Yes, you can take probiotics during or after a dose of

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    . In fact, some doctors recommend it. Here's why probiotics can help you get back on track and the best time to take them.

    How antibiotics work

    If you have a bacterial infection, like strep throat or a UTI, your doctor will likely prescribe you an antibiotic for treatment.

    The purpose of the antibiotic is to destroy the harmful bacteria that are making you sick. However, antibiotics don't know the difference between harmful bacteria and the helpful bacteria in your gut that comprise your microbiome.

    Therefore, as they work to make you better, antibiotics can also disrupt both the balance and amount of good bacteria in your gut. Research has shown that certain changes in intestinal bacteria can be associated with a higher risk of diseases like obesity, inflammatory bowel disease,

    diabetes

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    , and depression

    . It is not yet fully clear whether these changes are causal or simply result from the same metabolic predispositions that cause these.

    However, it's safe and often recommended to take probiotics during and after a course of antibiotics, since they can decrease some of the side effects of antibiotics.

    "Probiotics are live microorganisms. They are generally safe to consume," says Rudolph Bedford, MD, a gastroenterologist at Providence Saint John's Health Center.

    Probiotics can be taken as a supplement or you can get them by consuming fermented foods and drinks like yogurt, kombucha, and kimchi.

    The best time to take probiotics: during and after treatment

    Bedford recommends that you start taking probiotics the same day as an antibiotic treatment.

    While you're on antibiotics, take those first before the probiotics. Don't take them at the exact same time because the antibiotics could destroy the bacteria from the probiotic and cancel out any beneficial effects, Bedford says.

    "You don't want the probiotic on board until a couple of hours after the antibiotic itself is taken," says Bedford.

    Moreover, Bedford highly recommends that you continue to take probiotics for two weeks after you've completed your antibiotic dose to get your gut microbiome back to normal.

    Take probiotics to reduce antibiotic-associated diarrhea

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. However, preliminary research suggests that taking probiotics may help prevent antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD).

    For example, one review of 17 studies found that taking a probiotic may reduce the risk of developing AAD by 51%.

    Moreover, some antibiotics can leave you more vulnerable to certain infections, like Clostridium difficile (C. diff). This is a bacterial infection that can cause diarrhea, an inflamed colon, and, in severe cases death.

    However, preliminary research found that taking probiotics may help prevent diarrhea from C. diff infections, though the correlation was weak. For example, based on a review of 31 studies, researchers report that one case of diarrhea for every 42 C. diff-infected patients may be prevented from taking probiotics.

    As for what type of probiotic to take, one option is a yeast called Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745, sold under the brand name Florastar. This probiotic supplement is used to help prevent and treat diarrhea.

    Those who are immunocompromised may not benefit from probiotics and should discuss other options with a doctor.

    Insider's takeaway

    It may be a good idea to take probiotics with antibiotics in order to deal with the uncomfortable symptoms of antibiotics like diarrhea. You can also get the same benefits of probiotics by eating naturally probiotic foods like yogurt, kombucha, and kimchi.

    Ashley Laderer

    Ashley Laderer is a freelance writer from New York who specializes in health and wellness. Follow her on Twitter @ashladerer

    Source : www.insider.com

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