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    bill and melinda gates institute for population control

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    Gates Institute for Population & Reproductive Health

    LEARN MORE LEARN MORE LEARN MORE LEARN MORE LEARN MORE LEARN MORE MAR 17

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    VIEW ALL NEWS @GATESJHU

    RT @thegenderwire: Through the @ICFP2022 Youth Trailblazer Award young leaders in the field of family planning & SRHR were invited to… https://t.co/d2hz6gYf6h

    TWEETED: MARCH 17, 2022

    @GATESJHU

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    Source : www.gatesinstitute.org

    The Long, Strange History of Bill Gates Population Control Conspiracy Theories

    How the billionaire philanthropist displaced George Soros as the chief bogeyman of the right.

    ENVIRONMENT & HEALTH

    The Long, Strange History of Bill Gates Population Control Conspiracy Theories

    How the billionaire philanthropist displaced George Soros as the chief bogeyman of the right.

    May 12, 2020 by Kathryn Joyce

    Photo by WILLIAM WEST/AFP via Getty Images

    Anti-vaccine protesters in Melbourne, Australia on May 10, 2020.

    Three months into the global pandemic, Bill Gates has displaced George Soros as the chief bogeyman of the right.

    OUR PARTNER

    In April, dozens of Texans crowded around Infowars host Alex Jones at an anti-shutdown demonstration in Austin, Texas, chanting “arrest Bill Gates.” A New York-based tech nonprofit falsely rumored to be working with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to implant vaccine microchips in people received so many death threats that it contacted the FBI. And a White House petition demanding the billionaire’s foundation be investigated for “medical malpractice and crimes against humanity” amassed half-a-million signatures in three weeks.

    Gates, who has announced that his $40 billion-foundation will shift its “total attention” to fighting COVID-19, has been accused of a range of misdeeds, from scheming to profit off a vaccine to creating the virus itself. On April 8, Fox News host Laura Ingraham and Attorney General Bill Barr speculated about whether Gates would use digital certificates to monitor anyone who got vaccinated.

    KEY FINDINGS

    Accusations that Bill Gates has sinister plans to control or experiment on the public under the guise of medical charity date back at least a decade, in part to an obscure political fight in Ghana.

    A Christian Right broadcaster, Brannon Howse of “Worldview Watch,” warned that Gates and the “medical globalist deep state” were using the crisis to regulate people’s fertility depending on their worldview, through “procreation tickets” and microchips. On Instagram, anti-vaccination activist Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., posted a video featuring a “1984”-style audience listening to Gates, with text declaring that the Microsoft Corp. co-founder “is conducting global social and medical experimentation,” via the World Health Organization. The New York Times noted that misinformation about Gates has become “the most widespread of all coronavirus falsehoods” trending online.

    Arindam Shivaani/NurPhoto via Getty Images

    An anti-lockdown rally in Toronto, Canada, on April 25, 2020.

    But while these themes have fed the imagination of QAnon, Pizzagate and anti-vaccination proponents since January, conspiracy theories involving Gates actually have a much longer history. Accusations that he has sinister plans to control or experiment on the public under the guise of medical charity date back at least a decade, including to an obscure and different political fight in Ghana.

    A New War Over Birth Control In Africa

    In 2010, a former staffer with a government health initiative in Ghana made a shocking claim: a project partially funded by the Gates Foundation had tested the contraceptive Depo-Provera on unsuspecting villagers in the remote region of Navrongo, as part of an illicit “population experiment.” The woman making the charge was the Ghanian-born, U.S.-educated communications officer for another Gates-funded initiative by the Ghanaian government and Columbia University to use mobile phones to improve health care access for rural women and children. She had previously attempted to sue her employer for a multi-million dollar settlement when, after repeated clashes with her boss, her contract wasn’t renewed.

    The lawsuit fizzled, but with help from a small U.S. nonprofit called the Rebecca Project for Human Rights, she shopped a series of stories to Ghana’s tabloid press. The Depo-Provera story caused a national scandal. Although it was denounced by Ghanaian health professionals and traditional leaders as libelous—the Navrongo project hadn’t tested any medications— so many death threats were directed at the project that some staff had to be evacuated across the Burkina Faso border.

    The new narrative was that Gates was waging “chemical warfare on poor women” in a neocolonial effort to suppress African births.

    The episode would mark the opening shot in a new war over birth control in Africa. It also reflected an evolution in the U.S. anti-abortion movement’s strategy in which it started to co-opt the language of women’s and civil rights used by progressives. There were fewer bloody fetus posters and more talk about how abortion and contraception violated women’s safety and impeded racial justice.

    Anti-abortion groups hired black activists and highlighted uglier aspects of the history of reproductive health care — in particular, the courting of the eugenics movement by Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger in the early part of the 20th century. A right-wing documentary, Maafa 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America, used a Swahili word that refers to the holocaust of African enslavement to denounce Planned Parenthood as racist. Billboards in Atlanta and Manhattan carried messages like, “The most dangerous place for an African American is in the womb.” And federal and state legislators proposed a series of bills banning race- and sex-selective abortions in order to insinuate that abortion providers deliberately target communities of color.

    Source : www.typeinvestigations.org

    False claim: Gates Foundation has a “Center for Global Human Population Reduction” sign

    A false claim on social media says the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has a sign reading “Center for Global Human Population Reduction” on its building exterior. The image circulating online has been digitally altered to include the words “Center for Global Human Population...

    EVERYTHINGNEWS

    MAY 4, 20205:40 PMUPDATED 2 YEARS AGO

    False claim: Gates Foundation has a “Center for Global Human Population Reduction” sign

    By Reuters Staff

    The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation campus in Seattle, Washington, on June 2, 2011. The Gates Foundation, the largest philanthropic foundation in the world, supports work in more than 100 countries in areas of health, development, and education. REUTERS/Marcus Donner (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)

    A false claim on social media says the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has a sign reading “Center for Global Human Population Reduction” on its building exterior. The image circulating online has been digitally altered to include the words “Center for Global Human Population Reduction” on the Foundation’s building façade. In reality, this sign reads, “Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation”.

    Examples of the manipulated photograph can be seen here and here .

    Photographs of the actual Foundation’s exterior can be seen on Google maps ( goo.gl/maps/JX4WNH2QBgv3d6Qe6 ) and in news reports about the Foundation (examples here and here ).

    The Gates Foundation confirmed to Reuters via email that the image in this claim was fake.

    Amidst the new coronavirus outbreak, the Reuters Fact Check team has debunked multiple false claims circulating on social media about Bill Gates, visible here , here, and here .

    VERDICT

    False. The words “Center for Global Human Population Reduction” have been photoshopped to the Foundation’s exterior.

    This article was produced by the Reuters Fact Check team. Read more about our work to fact-check social media posts here .

    Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

    Source : www.reuters.com

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