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    based on the epic simile, how should the reader picture the beam of wood odysseus found in the cave?

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    Based on the epic simile, how should the reader picture the beam of wood Odysseus found in the cave?

    Here are the means I though would serve my turn: a club, or staff, lay there along the fold- an olive tree, felled green and left to season for ...

    The Odyssey

    Based on the epic simile, how should the reader picture the beam of wood Odysseus found in the cave?

    Here are the means I though would serve my turn:

    a club, or staff, lay there along the fold-

    an olive tree, felled green and left to season

    for Cyclops' hand. And it was like a mast

    a lugger of twenty oars, board in the beam-

    a deep-sea-going craft-might carry:

    so long, so big around, it seemed.

    Asked by kendy v #468906 6 years ago 1/6/2016 6:21 AM

    Last updated by Drew Green J #683666 5 years ago 9/6/2017 10:18 PM

    Source : www.gradesaver.com

    The Odyssey: Central Ideas and Character Motivation, Part 2 Flashcards

    Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards terms like Read the excerpt from The Odyssey. Neither reply nor pity came from him, but in one stride he clutched at my companions and caught two in his hands like squirming puppies to beat their brains out, spattering the floor. Then he dismembered them and made his meal, gaping and crunching like a mountain lion— everything: innards, flesh, and marrow bones. What can be inferred about the Cyclops?, Nohbdy, Nohbdy's tricked me, Nohbdy's ruined me!' To this rough shout they made a sage reply: 'Ah well, if nobody has played you foul there in your lonely bed, we are no use in pain given by great Zeus. Let it be your father, Poseidon Lord, to whom you pray.' So saying they trailed away. And I was filled with laughter to see how like a charm the name deceived them. In the excerpt, the word "charm" is being compared with, Why not take these cheeses, get them stowed, come back, throw open all the pens, and make a run for it? We'll drive the kids and lambs aboard. We say put out again on good salt water!' Ah, how sound that was! Yet I refused. I wished to see the caveman, what he had to offer— no pretty sight, it turned out, for my friends. Based on this excerpt, what inference can be made about Odysseus? Check all that apply. and more.

    The Odyssey: Central Ideas and Character Motivation, Part 2

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    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    Neither reply nor pity came from him,

    but in one stride he clutched at my companions

    and caught two in his hands like squirming puppies

    to beat their brains out, spattering the floor.

    Then he dismembered them and made his meal,

    gaping and crunching like a mountain lion—

    everything: innards, flesh, and marrow bones.

    What can be inferred about the Cyclops?

    Click card to see definition 👆

    He is savage and brutal like a wild animal.

    Click again to see term 👆

    Nohbdy, Nohbdy's tricked me, Nohbdy's ruined me!'

    To this rough shout they made a sage reply:

    'Ah well, if nobody has played you foul

    there in your lonely bed, we are no use in pain

    given by great Zeus. Let it be your father,

    Poseidon Lord, to whom you pray.'

    So saying

    they trailed away. And I was filled with laughter

    to see how like a charm the name deceived them.

    In the excerpt, the word "charm" is being compared with

    Click card to see definition 👆

    name

    Click again to see term 👆

    1/10 Created by Zebra550

    Terms in this set (10)

    Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.

    Neither reply nor pity came from him,

    but in one stride he clutched at my companions

    and caught two in his hands like squirming puppies

    to beat their brains out, spattering the floor.

    Then he dismembered them and made his meal,

    gaping and crunching like a mountain lion—

    everything: innards, flesh, and marrow bones.

    What can be inferred about the Cyclops?

    He is savage and brutal like a wild animal.

    Nohbdy, Nohbdy's tricked me, Nohbdy's ruined me!'

    To this rough shout they made a sage reply:

    'Ah well, if nobody has played you foul

    there in your lonely bed, we are no use in pain

    given by great Zeus. Let it be your father,

    Poseidon Lord, to whom you pray.'

    So saying

    they trailed away. And I was filled with laughter

    to see how like a charm the name deceived them.

    In the excerpt, the word "charm" is being compared with

    name Why not

    take these cheeses, get them stowed, come back,

    throw open all the pens, and make a run for it?

    We'll drive the kids and lambs aboard. We say

    put out again on good salt water!'

    Ah,

    how sound that was! Yet I refused. I wished

    to see the caveman, what he had to offer—

    no pretty sight, it turned out, for my friends.

    Based on this excerpt, what inference can be made about Odysseus? Check all that apply.

    Odysseus's curiosity about the Cyclops is stronger than his good judgment.

    Odysseus wants to see if the Cyclops has anything to give to him and his men.

    O Cyclops! Would you feast on my companions?

    Puny, am I, in a Caveman's hands?

    How do you like the beating that we gave you,

    you damned cannibal? Eater of guests

    under your roof! Zeus and the gods have paid you!'

    According to this excerpt, Odysseus

    is prideful and overly confident.

    Neither reply nor pity came from him,

    but in one stride he clutched at my companions

    and caught two in his hands like squirming puppies

    to beat their brains out, spattering the floor.

    The epic simile in this excerpt shows

    how helpless Odysseus's men are in the clutches of the Cyclops.

    Here are the means I thought would serve my turn:

    a club, or staff, lay there along the fold—

    an olive tree, felled green and left to season

    for Cyclops' hand. And it was like a mast

    a lugger of twenty oars, broad in the beam—

    a deep-sea-going craft—might carry:

    so long, so big around, it seemed.

    Based on the epic simile, how should the reader picture the beam of wood Odysseus found in the cave?

    like the mast of an enormously large ship

    Then,

    his chores being all dispatched, he caught

    another brace of men to make his breakfast,

    and whisked away his great door slab

    to let his sheep go through—but he, behind,

    reset the stone as one would cap a quiver.

    What two things are being compared in this epic simile?

    the stone to a quiver

    Then,

    his chores being all dispatched, he caught

    another brace of men to make his breakfast,

    and whisked away his great door slab

    to let his sheep go through—but he, behind,

    reset the stone as one would cap a quiver.

    The use of the epic simile in this excerpt helps readers understand that

    the enormous stone is easily and routinely moved by the giant Cyclops.

    My ship?

    Poseidon Lord, who sets the earth a-tremble,

    broke it up on the rocks at your land's end.

    A wind from seaward served him, drove us there.

    We are survivors, these good men and I.'

    What motivates Odysseus to tell a lie to the Cyclops?

    Odysseus does not want to reveal their only means of escape.

    In the next land we found were Cyclopes,

    giants, louts, without a law to bless them.

    In ignorance leaving the fruitage of the earth in mystery

    to the immortal gods, they neither plow

    nor sow by hand, nor till the ground, though grain—

    wild wheat and barley—grows untended, and

    Source : quizlet.com

    Based on the epic simile, how should the reader picture the beam of wood Odysseus found in the cave?

    Answer: Here are the significant extracts which describe the appearance of the pole. "Lying in the pen the Cyclops had a huge staff of green olive-wood, which he had cut to carry in his hand when it was seasoned. To us it looked more like the mast of some black ship of twenty oars, a broad-botto...

    Based on the epic simile, how should the reader picture the beam of wood Odysseus found in the cave?

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    Sort Amy Dakin

    MA and BA (Hons) Classics, Odyssey specialisation.Author has 1.4K answers and 3.8M answer views6y

    Here are the significant extracts which describe the appearance of the pole.

    "Lying in the pen the Cyclops had a huge staff of green olive-wood, which he had cut to carry in his hand when it was seasoned. To us it looked more like the mast of some black ship of twenty oars, a broad-bottomed merchantman such as makes long sea-voyages. That was the impression which its length and thickness made on us." Od.9.320

    Then, the way Odysseus shapes it:

    "Standing beside this piece of timber I cut off a fathom's length, which I handed over to my men and told them to smooth it down. When they had done this I stood and sharpened it to a point. Then I hardened it in the fire" Od.9.325

    And the final description:

    "I went at once and thrust our pole deep under the ashes of the fire to make it hot, and meanwhile gave a word of encouragement to all my men, to make sure that no one would hang back through fear. When the fierce glow from the olive stake warned me that it was about to catch alight in the flames, green as it was, I withdrew it from the fire and my men gathered around. A god now inspired them with tremendous courage. Seizing the olive pole, they drove its sharpened end into the Cyclops' eye, while I used my weight from above to twist it home, like a man boring a ship's timber with a drill which his mates below him twirl with a strap they hold at either end, so that it spins continuously." Od.9.375

    It seems to be a large stick, compared to the mast of a ship, and made from young olive wood. It's a smoothed walking stick to the Cyclops, possibly used for shepherding his flocks, but it takes a number of Odysseus' men to hold it. A fathom is just under two metres long. He then sharpens and hardens one end into a point, and his men smooth the rest, to remove splinters or to make it easier to hold, I presume.

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    Chad Turner

    BA MA PhD in Classical StudiesAuthor has 4.5K answers and 2.8M answer views3y

    Related

    How did the tree in Odysseus' house survive when there was an entire house built around it? Don't trees need exposure to the sun for photosynthesis?

    Check out Odysseus’ description of how he made the bed in Odyssey 23:

    Homer, Odyssey, Book 23 (English Text)

    The tree didn’t really remain a tree — it’s not like he just slung a hammock from it. Odysseus trimmed off the branches and turned the trunk into furniture. Unrealistic? Sure. So was the bit where Circe turned Odysseus’ men into pigs. Best not to overthink these things. Sometimes you just need to let art flow over you.

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    Terry Singleton

    Former Diamond Driller (1970–2000)Author has 1.6K answers and 253.5K answer viewsMay 7

    Related

    How did Eumaeus come to be a servant of Odysseus' farm?

    Eumaeus came from the island of Ctesios in the Cyclades group only a few days sailing to mainland Greece and the small isle of Ithaca, which was Odysseus's home and domain.

    Eumaeus was kidnapped by his nurse one day and she escaped on a ship to Greek mainland. In the event, nurse gets killed and the ship eventually pulls into lthaka and Odysseuss' father, Laertes, buys Eumaeus as a slave. He is bought up more or less as one of the family and remained utterly loyal to Odysseus' household, to Penelope, his wife and Telemachus his son.

    This cowherd/ servant but born of royalty back in Ctesias is, i

    Zoe Fang

    Works at Macy's (department stores)Author has 5.1K answers and 3.3M answer views9mo

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    How many times did Odysseus cheat on Penelope?

    He was stuck in Troy fighting for ten whole years—trying to get the HELL out of there yet the war wouldn’t end until ten years was over. You can thank an IDIOTIC Paris for wrecking his family, his city and countless other lives.

    After the war and Odysseus finally got out of Troy and headed home with his crew he had a perilous voyage home, dealing with gods who hated him—i.e Poseidon, cyclopes, lotus eaters, Sirens who tried to lure his crew to death with their fatal singing, and Circe, and then Calypso—an enchantingly lovely goddess who kept him on her island for a long time—yet Odysseus though

    Chad Turner

    Classics PhD, specializing in Greek tragedy and Greek/Roman mythologyAuthor has 4.5K answers and 2.8M answer views4y

    Related

    How long has Odysseus been with Calypso?

    According to Homer, it was seven years.

    Kyle Breaux

    Agnostic Atheist with an Epicurean Humanist Life PhilosophyAuthor has 18.4K answers and 5.9M answer viewsMay 23

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    Why does Odysseus taunt Polyphemus?

    Odysseus is an instrument of fate who punished Polyphemus for his atrocities is the image Homer tried to paint.

    Remember, that at the end of the narrative Prometheus is seized with great terror and fury when he hears the name Odysseus.

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    James 15 day ago
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